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Easter Island
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PeripartOffline
is still wondering
Joined: 01 Aug 2005
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PostPosted: 07-09-2009 21:27    Post subject: Reply with quote

ramonmercado wrote:
rynner2 wrote:
I never thought there was any mystery about the hats.
This sounds like someone trying to justfy their grant money...


Researchers always have to go cap in hand to get the next grant.

You're taking the pith again. Mitre known...
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 26-10-2009 15:27    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bet Nick Griffin will use this to justify some BNP policies.


Quote:
Easter Island to curb immigrants
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/8325095.stm
By Gideon Long
BBC News, Santiago

Easter Island
Easter Island is 20 miles long with a population of 4,000

The inhabitants of Easter Island in the South Pacific have voted to restrict immigration amid overpopulation fears.

More than 90% of those who voted in this weekend's referendum said they were worried about an influx of residents from Chile.

Chile has administered the remote island outpost, famous for its carved stone statues, since the 19th century.

The referendum was organised by the Chilean government, which says the island is struggling to cope.

Constitutional change

With a population of just 4,000 people, Easter Island might not sound that crowded.

But the island is just 20 miles (32km) from one end to the other.

It is also more than 2,000 miles from the Chilean mainland, which generates all sorts of problems.

Disposing of rubbish in a sustainable, environmentally friendly way, for example, is becoming increasingly difficult.

Some 50,000 tourists visit the island each year to see the famous Maoi, the enigmatic carved stone heads that are dotted around the island.

As tourism has increased, hundreds of Chileans have moved in from the mainland to work in hotels, bars and as taxi drivers.

The Chilean parliament must now approve a change to the constitution to bring the new rules into effect.

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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 11-07-2010 17:19    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

Easter Island set for total solar eclipse
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/world/latin_america/10592671.stm

Moais - stone statues of the Rapa Nui culture - on Easter Island, 10 July Eclipse watchers will hope the cloud cover breaks

Thousands of tourists and scientists have descended on Chile's Easter Island to catch sight of Sunday's total solar eclipse.

The eclipse will only be visible from a small section of land, ending over southern parts of Chile and Argentina.

The eclipse starts at 1815 GMT about 700km (440 miles) south-east of Tonga, reaching Easter Island by 2011 GMT.

The population of Easter Island is expected to double to 8,000 - but the eclipse could be hit by cloud cover.

Some forecasters have warned that cloudy skies could dash hopes of a clear view in the area of land deemed best placed to see the eclipse.

Easter Island should be treated to a four minute and 41 second eclipse.
Increased security

A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between the sun and the Earth, blocking its rays and casting a shadow.

The eclipse will follow an 11,000km path but mostly over the Pacific - the longest time of eclipse, five minutes and 20 seconds, will be over sea.

Easter Island's governor has insisted it can cope with the influx, but there is increased security at sacred sites, including for the famous 3,000-year-old Moai stone statues.

The island was partly evacuated after Chile's earthquake in February and the authorities want to show that it is back on the tourist map.

Local mayor Luz del Carmen Zasso told Agence France-Presse news agency: "Easter Island is an open-air museum, and the eclipse is part of this museum."
Infographic (BBC)

* In the area covered by the umbra (the darkest part of the shadow), a total eclipse is seen

* In the region covered by the penumbra (where only some of the light source is obscured) a partial eclipse is seen
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KondoruOffline
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PostPosted: 15-07-2010 16:58    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh, they have organised an Eclipse!

thats real clever, that is
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 04-12-2010 20:38    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Easter Island land dispute clashes leave dozens injured
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-11917511

An resident of Easter Island with a pellet gun wound to her head (4 Dec 2010) Local people said the police had fired on people at close range
Continue reading the main story
Related stories

* Easter Island to curb immigrants
* Chile timeline

At least 25 people have been injured during clashes between Chilean police and local people on Easter Island.

Witnesses say police fired pellets as they tried to evict several indigenous inhabitants from buildings they occupied earlier this year.

The Rapa Nui group say the buildings were illegally taken from their ancestors several generations ago.

Easter Island, which was annexed by Chile in 1888, is a Unesco World Heritage Site.

Chilean security forces began their operation in the early hours of the morning, says reports.

When the group refused to leave and others gathered at the scene, they opened fire with pellet guns.

Officials said 17 police officers and eight civilians had been injured. But the Rapa Nui put the number of injured locals at 19, and denied that any police had been hurt.
Continue reading the main story
“Start Quote

The land on this island has always been Rapa Nui. That's why we're asking for our land to be returned”

End Quote Maka Atan Rapa Nui lawyer

A number of people were also arrested and at least one person was air-lifted to the mainland for medical treatment.

A statement on the Save Rapa Nui website said several people had been shot at close range. It said police had used rubber bullets and tear gas.

"They injured at least 23 of our brothers and sisters, three of them seriously," Edi Tuki, a relative of one of those injured, told the Efe news agency.

"One was shot in the eye with a buckshot pellet from just a metre away."
'Shooting to kill'

Maka Atan, a Rapa Nui lawyer, told the Associated Press police had been "shooting to kill". He said he was shot in the back by pellets.

"It seems like this is going to end with them killing the Rapa Nui," he said.

Rapa Nui is the official name for the remote Easter Island, which lies more than 3,200 km (2,000 miles) off the west coast of Chile.

The tiny island has a population of about 4,000 but is best known for its ancient giant carved stone heads, known as Moais.
Map

The indigenous Rapa Nui people have been protesting for the past three months about what say are plans to develop the island, as immigration and tourism increase.

They are demanding the return of ancestral land they say was unlawfully seized from their grandparents.

"The land on this island has always been Rapa Nui. That's why we're asking for our land to be returned," Mr Maka told AP.

"Nobody has said this is a normal situation," said Raul Celis. "There was an eviction, and buildings had been occupied illegally for several months."

Mr Celis said the evictions would continue.

Media reports said police reinforcements were travelling to the island from the mainland.
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 07-02-2011 14:42    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Police evict Rapa Nui clan from Easter Island hotel
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-12378736
Related Stories

* Injuries in Easter Island clashes
* Easter Island to curb immigrants
* Chile timeline

Police on Easter Island have evicted a group of indigenous people who had been occupying the grounds of a luxury hotel since last year.

The group of Rapa Nui say the land on which the hotel was built had been illegally taken from their ancestors generations ago.

They have been protesting for months over what they say are plans to develop Easter Island.

The island, annexed by Chile in 1888, is a Unesco World Heritage Site.

Members of the Hitorangi clan have been occupying the Hangaroa Eco Village and Spa since last August.

The hotel was bought from the Chilean government by the Scheiss family, a powerful investment group, in the 1990s, but the Rapa Nui say their ancestors had been cheated into giving up the land years before.

Rodrigo Gomez, a lawyer for the group, said up to 50 armed police had broken into the hotel to remove the final five occupiers. They were arrested and released pending court hearings.
'Good faith'

Mr Gomez said the operation had been "utterly irregular and illegal". It comes two days before the group was due to appear in court to discuss the ownership of the land.

A statement on the Save Rapa Nui website said a judge on the Chilean mainland had twice refused to give police permission to carry out the raid, and that another of the group's lawyers had been prevented from visiting his clients in jail.
An resident of Easter Island with a pellet gun wound to her head (4 Dec 2010) More than 20 Rapa Nui were injured last December as police tried to remove them

His claims could not be immediately confirmed.

Last December, more than 20 people were injured when police armed with pellet guns attempted to clear Rapa Nui protesters from buildings they were occupying.

In January this year, the UN's Special Rapporteur on Indigenous People, James Anaya, expressed concern about the Rapa Nui.

He urged the Chilean government to "make every effort to conduct a dialogue in good faith with representatives of the Rapa Nui people to solve, as soon as possible the real underlying problems that explain the current situation".

Rapa Nui is the official name for the remote Easter Island, which lies more than 3,200km (2,000 miles) off the west coast of Chile.

The tiny island has a population of about 4,000 but is best known for its ancient giant carved stone heads, known as Moais.
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 06-02-2012 23:59    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Did Easter Islanders Mix It Up With South Americans?
http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2012/02/did-easter-islanders-mix-it-up-w.html?ref=hp
by Andrew Lawler on 6 February 2012, 4:33 PM

Island mystery. The famous stone heads of Easter Island were erected by Polynesians—but did South Americans play a role on the island?
Credit: P. Drozd/Creative Commons

The scattered islands of the vast Pacific Ocean were settled by seafarers who set out from the eastern coasts and islands of Asia and traveled thousands of kilometers by boat. Meanwhile pre-Columbian South America was populated by people who crossed a now-vanished land bridge far to the north. Did these two groups ever meet in the New World? There's a good chance of that, according to a new study, which finds evidence that Easter Islanders may have reached South America and mixed with the Native Americans already there.

University of Oslo immunologist Erik Thorsby first began analyzing the people of Easter Island in 1971 to see if he and colleagues could detect traces of an early contribution of Native Americans to Polynesians. He believes that his recent finds may show that Native Americans may have accompanied Polynesians from the coast of South America to Easter Island before the arrival of Europeans.

The island, also called Rapa Nui, is a remote and rocky place 3700 kilometers west of the coast of South America. The people were forcibly deported to Peru in the 1860s and enslaved; therefore, evidence of mixed Polynesian and Native American genes may stem from this time. But Thorsby was able to use blood samples from the islanders, collected since the 1970s, to examine their DNA for particular genetic markers.

As expected, the majority of markers pointed to genes common in other Polynesians. But human leukocyte antigens—a group of genes that encode proteins essential to the human immune system—in the samples showed that a few individuals had a type, or allele, found among only Native Americans. The alleles in question were found on two different haplotypes—a set of alleles inherited by an individual from a single parent—in unrelated individuals. This and other circumstantial genetic evidence suggests that the alleles are older and were introduced centuries before the islanders were sent to Peru by Europeans, Thorsby reports today in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. "The results of our studies suggest that Polynesians visiting South America in the 1400s to 1500s may have taken some American Indians with them upon their return" back to Easter Island, he said in an e-mail from there, where he is conducting further research. That conclusion, he adds, is "speculative."

Scholars have seen some other hints of contact between Polynesians and the people of the New World. Some plants, such as the sweet potato, originated in the Andes Mountains but apparently spread across the Pacific Ocean before the arrival of Columbus. Researchers have noted hints of linguistic and artistic similarities between the western South American and the Polynesian culture. But definitive archaeological evidence is lacking. Finding genetic proof of Native American and Polynesian mixing prior to Columbus's arrival in the New World in 1492 would demonstrate that Polynesians had the capacity to reach South America.

Still, Thorsby's assertion is being greeted with polite skepticism from one scholar familiar with Easter Island's past. "It is good to see this kind of research, but a definitive answer isn't really possible given the lack of chronological control," says archaeologist Terry Hunt of the University of Hawaii, Manoa, who has worked extensively on the island. He says that Thorsby's data don't preclude the possibility that the mixing between these groups occurred later, after Europeans arrived. "Native American genes reaching Rapa Nui with European contact cannot be ruled out." He says what's needed to prove the theory are skeletons that predate the European arrival in 1722. But so far, most of the few remains seem to be later. "The odds are not great" of finding ancient human bones that might yield DNA, he adds. Thorsby acknowledges that more DNA studies of ancient material are needed but remains hopeful that he can clinch the case.
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