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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 28-10-2011 16:06    Post subject: Reply with quote

5ft bird sprints through town after escaping from farm
A 5ft bird causesd havoc in a residential area after escaping from a farm - because it had been spooked by a fox.
8:41AM BST 28 Oct 2011

The rhea bird - which is similar to an ostrich - ran almost three miles from a farm on the outskirts of Blackburn, Lancashire.
The South-American rhea was seen running around the Cherry Tree area of the town at around 8.15am on Thursday.

Adam Mazur, 13, was doing his paper round when the bird crossed his path.
He said: "It was right in front of me running really fast with its wings up. It just went across the road and ran down Feniscliffe Drive. I went home and told my mum I'd seen a giant bird but she wouldn't believe me." Cool

The bird's escape was finally stopped when it entered the garden of Tom Ansbro, 82, of Feniscliffe Drive. He said: "I couldn't believe my eyes.
It circled a couple of times and then stopped in our back garden."

Police then contacted Heath Kershaw, of Wellybobs Farm Park, Darwen, to deal with the situation.
He and colleague Karen Rostron managed to wrestle the bird into a trailer and calmed it by placing a hood over its head.

Farmer Michael Greenwood, who keeps around 50 of the flightless birds at Moorland Farm, Billinge End Road, Pleasington, said he was delighted to be 'rhea-united' with the bird.
He said: "I think she must have been spooked by a dog or fox and escaped. She's fine apart from a couple of grazes on her legs."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/wildlife/8855254/5ft-bird-sprints-through-town-after-escaping-from-farm.html
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 03-11-2011 08:23    Post subject: Reply with quote

Twitchers baffled by Bufflehead's arrival
9:09am Wednesday 2nd November 2011

This duck had an excuse for looking slightly lost last week as it found itself thousands of miles from home when it landed in a small pool on The Lizard.
The Bufflehead is normally found in North America, and is not believed to have been seen in Cornwall before.

It was spotted last Wednesday, but had moved on once more by Friday.
It is thought it could have been swept across the Atlantic after being caught in a storm while trying to migrate to Mexico for the winter.
The diving duck was photographed by Mike Barker on the small pool close to Housel Bay.

He said: “It is an extremely rare bird to the West Country and a possible first for Cornwall.”
He added: “This is the second one I have seen; the last being an adult male that stayed on Roadford Reservoir in Devon for a couple of months at the end of 1999.

“The Bufflehead is a migratory duck in North America, spending its winter as far South as Mexico.
“Considerable numbers of American migrant birds get caught in storms that sweep across the Atlantic.”

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/9338738.Twitchers_baffled_by_Bufflehead_s_arrival/
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 14-11-2011 20:41    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Eurasian Cranes sighted 300 years after becoming extinct in Ireland
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2011/1114/1224307527592.html
LORNA SIGGINS

Mon, Nov 14, 2011

THREE CENTURIES after they became extinct in Ireland, a flock of 15 Eurasian Cranes has been sighted flying over the southwest at the weekend.

“A good omen” is how Lorcan O’Toole of the Golden Eagle Trust has described the sighting over Castletownroche, north Cork, which he describes as being of “spiritual and scientific” interest.

The 15 birds were flying north. On the same day, one crane flying with lapwings was photographed over Rogerstown estuary, Dublin. While there have been occasional sightings, cranes have not bred here since the early 18th century and were under severe pressure for several centuries before. The majestic bird breeds across northern Europe, Russia and the Ukraine.

Cranes were once so prevalent here that their Irish name “corr” is recorded in hundreds of place names – such as “Curragh” or “crane meadow” in Co Kildare.

“Few native birds can rival the widespread cultural footprint and the connections with Fionn Mac Cumhaill, the druids, St Colmcille and the Book of Kells,” said Mr O’Toole.

Druids believed in transmigration of the soul and the cranes were said to carry the spirits of the dead. They are best known for their migratory trumpeting and their predilection for display.

“Research by Prof Fergus Kelly suggests that the ‘peata corr’ was the third commonest pet after dogs and cats during the Brehon Law period,” said Mr O’Toole. “The crane bag was a well known magical container in our ancient folklore, which had associations with Manannán Mac Lir, the great sea god, Lúgh and Fionn Mac Cumhaill.”

Its familiar bald red patch on its crown is depicted in the Book of Kells, and St Colmcille was known as the “crane cleric”, he added.

Colonisers from Viking and Anglo-Norman times who had no qualms about eating the bird may have contributed to its demise, along with an increase in the fox population, said Mr O’Toole.

Loss of wetlands was also a factor. And Mr O’Toole believes restoration of a breeding population could take place on restored peatland and wet meadows in areas like the north midlands.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 07-12-2011 08:21    Post subject: Reply with quote

Killer whales seen off Cornwall coast

Two killer whales have been seen off a headland in north Cornwall, a naturalist has reported.
Dom Clarke, 25, saw what he believed was a mother and calf about 100m off Trevose Head, near Padstow.
Mr Clarke saw the whales on 26 November while walking his dog. He said he was "amazed" with his find.

A spokesperson from Cornwall Wildlife Trust said the species was an "occasional visitor" although it was not reported every year.

Mr Clarke lives on Trevose Head and runs an adventure business called Explore the Shore.
He saw the whales at about 11:30 GMT.
"At the time they were heading south along the coast about 100m off the headland and 500m from the beach. It was pretty special.
"I walk around the area every day and it was beautiful to see these large marine mammals off shore.
"I'm so interested in anything oceanographic and I've never seen them here before. I was just amazed to see them."

The wildlife trust confirmed there had been a few reported sightings of killer whales off Cornwall this autumn.

Killer whales are also known as orcas, can grow up to 32ft (9.7m) in length and weigh up to nine tonnes.
They are mainly found around Iceland, Norway and northern Scotland, but occasionally seen as far south as the Atlantic coasts of Spain and Portugal.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-16050956
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oldroverOffline
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PostPosted: 07-12-2011 14:13    Post subject: Reply with quote

Saw this on TV earlier apparently one paper is running a warning to stay out of the water. North Cornwall not far from me I'd love them to turn up here.
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kamalktkOffline
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PostPosted: 07-12-2011 23:53    Post subject: Reply with quote

oldrover wrote:
Saw this on TV earlier apparently one paper is running a warning to stay out of the water.

And miss one's chance to be a Fortean footnote? Laughing
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oldroverOffline
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PostPosted: 09-12-2011 00:32    Post subject: Reply with quote

Better than that we've got a pub on the cliff top overlooking a bay (where Gwen's, or whatever her name is, house is in Torchwood) where a lot of the local marine mammals hang out. Sit there and watch someone else get lucky.

If that fails and nothing turns up, you can always point out to sea and watch the tourists desperately trying to see what it is you spotted.
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 10-12-2011 17:28    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Black widow spiders found in car imported from California
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-bristol-16126591

Mechanics used the internet to confirm the spiders were black widows

Related Stories

Venomous spider's nest in garden
Pregnancy theory over black widow
Black widow spider found in truck

Two venomous black widow spiders which were found in a car imported from the United States have been given a new home in Bristol.

The pair had been nesting inside the 1964 Ford Falcon, which was imported in January, but were only discovered when restoration work started last week.

Mechanics at Oxfordshire-based Damax found the first under the fuel tank and the second behind the dashboard.

The 1.5in-long (3.8cm) spiders have been donated to Bristol Zoo.

Robin Ward, who works in Bicester, said he used the internet to confirm the spider's identity from their hourglass markings.

"Fortunately I'm not scared of spiders, but I had quite a shock when we first suspected it could be a black widow," he said.

"We continued stripping the car with a great deal of caution and couldn't believe it when we found a second spider under the dashboard.

Continue reading the main story

Start Quote

They are not as deadly as people think... but they can still do some quite serious harm”

Mark Bushell
Bristol Zoo
"We were advised to phone a few organisations which might be able to take the spiders but none were able to help [as] I wanted the spiders to be rehomed rather than killed.

"We would have never found either of the spiders had we not completely stripped the car but we've finished it now and are 100% certain that there are no more," he added.

Mark Bushell, from Bristol Zoo, said black widow spiders were not as deadly as people thought.

"Having said that, they could still do some quite serious harm and their bite would certainly cause health problems," he added.

Black widow spiders live for about two years and are native to the US.

Their venom causes cramps and fever although their bites are rarely fatal because of the small amount of venom released.

Only the females are venomous and are called black widows because they eat their male partners after mating.
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oldroverOffline
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PostPosted: 14-12-2011 17:01    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Freezing lemur found on UK common

Lemurs are usually found on the tropical island of Madagascar so vets were stunned when one of the animals was admitted to hospital, suffering from hypothermia, after being discovered in sub-zero conditions on a common in the UK.

The severely ill ring-tailed primate, who has been named King Julien after the character in the animated film Madagascar, was found on Tooting Common in south-west London on Tuesday night.

He had collapsed in the sub-zero temperatures and was diagnosed with hypothermia, severe dehydration and shock by staff at the Blue Cross animal hospital in Victoria, London.


http://news.uk.msn.com/uk/freezing-lemur-found-on-uk-common

Poor little sod. How the hell you keep a venflon in a lemur is anyone's guess.
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AnalisOffline
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PostPosted: 17-12-2011 12:14    Post subject: Reply with quote

A python found dead :

http://www.francetv.fr/info/live/message/4ee/4d1/1d1/cc6/f04/388/003/7b3.html

On saturday 10 December, in Sassenage, near Grenoble, a resident who was pruning his tree, a weeping willow, was stunned when he saw a big spotted snake wrapped around branches. He called the firefighters, who climbed the tree to catch the reptile. They found it was dead, probably from cold. According to Le dauphiné libéré (11.12.2011), the snake, at 2.15 m long, was identified as a python belonging to the genus liasis, native from Indonesia, New Guinea and Australia. The firefighters brought it to a veterinary surgeon, in hope that he could find a chip allowing to identify its owner.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 17-12-2011 12:31    Post subject: Reply with quote

Crocodile found in box outside Wolverhampton pet shop

A pet shop in the West Midlands is trying to find a new home for a young crocodile thought to have been abandoned on its doorstep.
The South American crocodile, which could grow to 2.5m (8ft) long, was found in a plastic box outside Wickid Pets, Wolverhampton, earlier this week.

Owner Jimmy Wicks said legally bought crocodiles had to be microchipped.
"This has been scanned and there's no chip in it and so it's obviously come through the black market," he said.
He hopes to find a new home for the female crocodile, who is four or five years old and currently a metre long, at a local safari park.

Bob Lawrence, Director of Wildlife at West Midlands Safari Park, said people often bought exotic pets without realising what they were taking on.
"It's people like us and the RSPCA who have to pick up the pieces once they become unmanageable or escape," he said.

Mr Wicks said it was not the first time the shop had had to look after an abandoned crocodile.
"It's the fourth one we've had in 18 months Shocked and so now when we see a plastic box we have to approach it with caution," he said.

He said they had also had to find homes for turtles, birds of prey, snakes, and lizards that had been left outside the shop.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-birmingham-16230521
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 24-12-2011 16:04    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hurricane Katia blows North American birds to Cornwall
By Chris Ellis, BBC News Online, South West

An "exceptional number" of North American birds have been seen in Cornwall after being blown off course by a hurricane, an organisation said.
This autumn, 18 species native to the Americas were seen compared to 10 in 2010 and seven in 2009, the Cornwall Birding Association said.
Hurricane Katia, which affected the East Coast of the US in early autumn, was behind the "influx", it added.

The RSPB said some good species had arrived this autumn in the south west.
The association's Paul Freestone said: "We have certainly had an excellent autumn with an exceptional number of American vagrants.
"The hurricane created ideal conditions for pushing migrating American landbirds across the Atlantic to our shores."

Species reported in Cornwall from the Americas between August and November included wading birds such as the lesser yellowlegs and spotted sandpiper and small birds like the scarlet tanager and red-eyed vireo.

Tony Whitehead, from the RSPB, said the combination of birds migrating across the Americas and the weather system had caused them to arrive in the UK.
"The birds will arrive exhausted, with some surviving for a while and living amongst similar UK species, but many will die shortly after they arrive," he added.

Mr Freestone said the number of each species that reached Cornwall this year had increased compared to autumns of 2009 and 2010, with most species arriving around or shortly after the hurricane hit the East Coast of the US.

During the autumn, there were about 20 separate reports of a wading bird that migrates from North to South America, called a buff breasted sandpiper.
The species was seen at various locations in Cornwall, including at Marazion, Wadebridge and the Lizard, he said.
This was compared to three in 2010 and two in 2009.

The rarities were reported and counted by birdwatchers throughout the season and collated by the association.
Two species seen this autumn, a wading bird called a greater yellowlegs and a songbird called the scarlet tanager, have both only ever been recorded in Cornwall on one other occasion, Mr Freestone said.

Hurricane Katia caused large waves and strong winds off the East Coast of the US.
The remnants of the hurricane caused storm-force winds and heavy rain to affect areas of the UK in September.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-16088864
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oldroverOffline
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PostPosted: 10-01-2012 12:33    Post subject: Reply with quote

Saw the beginning of this programme last night;

Ball Cutter Fish Kills Fishermen by Biting off Their Testicles
By Sumitra on January 6th, 2012 Category: Animals, News

Quote:
Man-eating predators have always been part of legend and folk-lore. But here we have news of a real-life monster, interested in only one part of the human anatomy – the testicles.

The monster in question is in fact a 40lb fish called Pacu, found in the waters of Papua New Guinea. The Pacu are notorious for having eaten up the testicles of swimmers and anglers caught unawares, leaving them to bleed to death. This has led to the creatures being nicknamed ‘Ball Cutter’ fish. Initially, the villagers could only describe the monster-fish as something mysterious, like a ‘human in the water’. They finally got to see the predator up-close when a Pacu fish was recently caught by Jeremy Wade, a 53-year old British Fisherman, as a part of his TV series called River Monsters.


I've got to say I'm a big fan of this programme, I really think it and it's presenter are far and away the best of any of the 'looking for strange beastie' genre, and he always gets the thing at the end.
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amyasleighOffline
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PostPosted: 10-01-2012 12:39    Post subject: Reply with quote

What with this Ball Cutter Fish, and a reputed spider the size of a small dog -- I have totally removed New Guinea from my list of possible holiday destinations. (I gather that the human inhabitants can be a bit dodgy, too.)
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oldroverOffline
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PostPosted: 10-01-2012 12:40    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
(I gather that the human inhabitants can be a bit dodgy, too.)


As I understood it Wade didn't get the greatest reception initially. Still though don't rule it out as it's possible thylacine country.
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