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Church criticised in abuse probes
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 13-02-2012 16:28    Post subject: Reply with quote

Obake wrote:
Resisting the temptation to cross-post in the Conspiracy forum, all I'll say is: Ya just can't make this sh!t up:

Quote:


PHILADELPHIA (Reuters) - A full autopsy for Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua, a key witness in a Catholic Church sex abuse trial who died last month, is unwarranted, the coroner examining the death said on Saturday.

Bevilacqua, the retired archbishop of Philadelphia, died at age 88 on January 31, the day after a judge ruled he was competent to testify in an upcoming sex abuse trial involving clerics and a schoolteacher.

Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman told reporters on Friday she had asked Coroner Walter Hofman to make a determination about the death, noting that it had come soon after the judge's ruling.

Hofman told Reuters that he had spoken to Bevilacqua's doctor the night of his death "and we felt very confident that this was not anything we need to look into further."


http://news.yahoo.com/coroner-rejects-autopsy-retired-philadelphia-cardinals-death-190645131.html


Someone dies just before they are due to give evidence. No need for post mortem says coroner. Hmmm.
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gncxxOffline
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PostPosted: 13-02-2012 18:09    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, but he was 88, not exactly in the first flush of youth. Most likely natural causes. Unfortunate timing, yes, but probably no more than that.
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ObakeOffline
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PostPosted: 26-02-2012 13:59    Post subject: Reply with quote

gncxx wrote:
Yeah, but he was 88, not exactly in the first flush of youth. Most likely natural causes. Unfortunate timing, yes, but probably no more than that.


While I don't disagree, if he had testified, it appears he would have had three choices: perjure himself, assert his 5th Amendment rights, or admit to this (and God knows what else) in open court. Even if it was natural causes, an autopsy couldn't have hurt.

Quote:
Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua ordered aides to shred a 1994 memo that identified 35 Archdiocese of Philadelphia priests suspected of sexually abusing children, according to a new court filing.

The order, outlined in a handwritten note locked away for years at the archdiocese's Center City offices, was disclosed Friday by lawyers for Msgr. William J. Lynn, the former church administrator facing trial next month.

They say the shredding directive proves what Lynn has long claimed: that a church conspiracy to conceal clergy sex abuse was orchestrated at levels far above him.
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PostPosted: 21-03-2012 14:52    Post subject: Reply with quote

The latest report. But the Vatican fail to acknowledge any responsibility and are cynically using this as an opportunity to increase their control over orthodoxy in the Irish church.

Quote:
Document vital for 'journey of renewal'
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2012/0321/1224313640559.html
CHARLIE TAYLOR

Wed, Mar 21, 2012

VATICAN REPORT

THE REPORT on the clerical abuse crisis is intended as a contribution to the ongoing spiritual and moral renewal of the church, Primate of All-Ireland Cardinal Seán Brady has said.

Dr Brady said yesterday that the summation was not intended to replace or supersede the work of other agencies and was different from other reviews into the clerical abuse scandal in Ireland.

“This was a pastoral visitation which seeks to understand and work out the implications of faith for a given situation in which the church finds itself. We must never forget that it was offered to us as a help,” he said.

Speaking in St Patrick’s College, Maynooth, Dr Brady said the report provided “a helpful snapshot of a key moment on the ongoing journey of renewal, and a signpost to future priorities and directions”.

He added: “As bishops we wish to associate ourselves with the great sense of pain and shame expressed in the visitation findings.

“In expressing true sorrow and regret, we make our own the heartfelt plea for forgiveness from the victims and from God, for these terrible crimes and sins.”

Dr Brady said he personally regretted the fact that he did not realise earlier the impact of abuse on its victims.

He particularly welcomed the call in the report to devote more time and effort into listening to and providing support for abuse victims.

Dr Brady said the report offered great encouragement for the church by noting the continuing vitality of the Irish people’s faith and acknowledgment of the work done to implement child safety guidelines. It was vital the church continued to build on these welcome signs of hope.

Archbishop of Dublin Diarmuid Martin said the extent of the abuse that happened in the church was “shattering” and those who were abused “should be foremost in our minds”.Confirming that the seven individual reports would not be published, but had been made available to individual superiors, Dr Martin described the summation as a “wide-ranging, comprehensive summary of what is in all the reports”.

“I recognise in this everything that was said in the draft reports I saw,” he said.

Dr Martin said the report’s recommendation for changes to seminaries and admission criteria for would-be priests did not mean they would be cloistered.

“I certainly think that as a trustee of Maynooth I would be very careful to ensure we don’t have a system that would build a new clericalism,” he said.

Sr Marianne O’Connor, director general of the Conference of Religious of Ireland, said all religious congregations would take time to review the findings with a view to ensuring that the work already undertaken in regard to safeguarding children and supporting abuse survivors continued.

“I think everyone understands that this has affected everybody. The fallout has affected all members of the church,” she said.

“In that atmosphere what I think the visitation team is trying to do is encourage all elements of the church to look again at the Gospel that has inspired our lives,” she said.

The papal nuncio to Ireland, Archbishop Charles Brown, said Pope Benedict had been “outstanding” in his desire and his efforts to address issues around clerical sexual abuse.

“There has been a progression and learning and an improved dressing of problems. Of that there can be no doubt,” he said. “In the face of child abuse everyone is horrified by these cases and the only way in which we can respond is with an absence of arrogance and with profound humility.”
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PostPosted: 21-03-2012 14:58    Post subject: Reply with quote

Editorial. Full text at link.

Quote:
Orthodoxy and control

AN EDITED version of a report by Vatican-appointed churchmen into child sexual abuse in Ireland and how the issues arising for the Catholic Church might be addressed has been published. Apart from expressing support for child protection measures already in place, the emphasis was on orthodoxy and control, while assisting “the local church” on the path of renewal.

Little effort was made to chart the injury done to vulnerable children by a small number of rapacious individuals. A line was being drawn under a succession of dismal chapters involving decades of clerical and religious abuse, along with denials and cover-ups.
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/opinion/2012/0321/1224313640164.html


Analysis by Vincent Browne. Full text at link.

Quote:
Theology of priesthood behind sex abuse crisis
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/opinion/2012/0321/1224313638532.html
March 21st, 1956
VINCENT BROWNE

CLERICAL SEXUAL abuse is inevitable given the meaning system that is taught by the Catholic Church and to which many priests adhere.

Contradictions in that system lead to failure, increase shame and a way of living that encourages deviant behaviour.

This is the thesis of a revealing book on sexual abuse within the church by an Irish academic and therapist who interviewed, at length, nine priests and brothers convicted of child abuse, who counselled several other clerical abusers and who undertook extensive research on the issue for her book Child Sexual Abuse and the Catholic Church: Gender, Power and Organisational Culture. The author is Marie Keenan of the school of applied social science at UCD.

It is evident that the apostolic visitors – Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor, Archbishop Emeritus of Westminster, Cardinal Seán O’Malley, Archbishop of Boston, Thomas Christopher Collins, Archbishop of Toronto and Timothy Dolan, Archbishop of New York – didn’t read the book or speak to Keenan while in Ireland.

Their report, published in summary form yesterday, might have been very different had they done so.

The culture inculcated in Catholic clergy is that they are separate from other human beings because of their special “calling” from God, because of their sole capacity to administer the sacraments, to turn bread and wine into the body and blood of Jesus Christ, because of their power to forgive sin and administer the last rites.

From the moment of their ordination they are apart, apart in the minds of other convinced Catholics and apart in their own minds. And they are also celibate, because of that “calling”. Abjuring intimate sexual relations, sublimating their sexual urges and widely admired in the communities they inhabit on account of that sublimation.
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PostPosted: 21-03-2012 15:12    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another report on a separate scandal with more evidence of political involvement. I'm sure the message got around the homes: report the abuse and you will be castrated.

Quote:
Dutch Catholic-run institutions castrated boys for 'homosexual feelings'
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/world/2012/0321/1224313642083.html
PETER CLUSKEY in The Hague

Wed, Mar 21, 2012

THE CATHOLIC Church in the Netherlands has been hit by a new sex abuse scandal following the revelation that up to a dozen teenage boys may have been castrated while in the care of church-run psychiatric institutions during the 1950s.

Minutes of board meetings held at the institutions show that government health inspectors were present in some cases when decisions were taken to forcibly castrate young boys because they were allegedly showing evidence of “homosexual feelings”.

The minutes also reveal that the directors of the institutions felt they were entitled to take the decisions without any reference to the boys’ parents, some of whom were never officially informed – and many of whom found out only after their sons, still minors, had undergone the operations.

The barbarity of the individual stories have horrified the Dutch public, who have been doubly shocked by the fact that although the castrations were uncovered by the Deetman commission – set up in 2010 to investigation clerical sex abuse – they were not included in its 1,100-page report, published before Christmas.

The report confirmed that more than 800 Catholic priests and monks abused as many as 20,000 children in their care between 1945 and 1985. It concluded that knowledge of this was widespread and accused religious orders, dioceses and even congregations of failing to help the victims or take action against the abusers.

However, investigators working for the commission – chaired by former education minister Wim Deetman – are now understood also to have been informed two years ago, in writing, about the castrations.

They say they decided not to mention them in the commission’s report because “there were too few leads for further research”.

MPs, however, have refused to accept that explanation, saying it casts doubt over the veracity of the entire report. They’ve demanded that Mr Deetman, a member of the council of state, attends a special parliamentary hearing to give more details of why mention of the castrations was suppressed.

They say they also want to ask Mr Deetman why his report included no mention of allegations that in 1968 a high-profile politician with the Catholic People’s Party (KVP) attempted to help several priests convicted of abusing children to avoid serving prison sentences.

That politician, the late Vic Marijnen, was prime minister from 1963 to 1965, as well as chairman of a children’s home in Gelderland province where dozens of children were sexually abused – including 16-year-old Henk Heithuis, whose decision to go to the police led to him becoming the first boy chosen for castration.

There are now calls for a full-scale parliamentary investigation into the abuse scandal because of growing concerns about the neutrality of the Deetman commission. “It’s now clear that there were instances of abuse that were inexplicably not included in the commission’s report,” said Laura Huisman, a spokesperson for the Liberal Party (VVD), led by Dutch prime minister Mark Rutte.

“We want a debate as soon as possible to find out why,” Ms Huisman added.
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PostPosted: 21-03-2012 15:30    Post subject: Reply with quote

More criticism & analysis.

Quote:
Report 'almost farcical' in places
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2012/0321/1224313640572.html
CHARLIE TAYLOR, PAUL CULLEN and LORNA SIGGINS

Wed, Mar 21, 2012

THE VATICAN is still not accepting responsibility for its role in creating the culture of cover-ups of the sexual abuse of children, it was claimed yesterday.

One in Four, which supports survivors of abuse, expressed disappointment over what it said was the Vatican’s failure to acknowledge that its interventions in the abuse scandal had allowed church leaders to ignore guidelines and to protect the church at the expense of the safety of children.

“While we welcome the findings of the visitation that the Irish church now has good child protection practices in place, we feel it is a lost opportunity to address the role played by the Vatican in perpetuating the policy of protecting abusive priests at the expense of children,” said executive director of the organisation Maeve Lewis.

One in Four founder Colm O’Gorman said the seven-page summary of the visitation reports offered very little of value and was “almost farcical” in places.

Speaking on Newstalk radio, he said that while the church had put a number of guidelines in place, it had resolutely failed to follow or respect them.

“Nowhere in this statement or in any statement the Vatican has ever made, has it acknowledged its responsibility for the cover-up of these crimes for its failure to properly address these crimes at any point,” he said.

Abuse survivor Christine Buckley, of the Aíslínn Centre, said the Vatican had once again failed to acknowledge the enormous damage done to children. “It’s actually a regression instead of a progression,” she said.

Another abuse survivor, Andrew Madden, said the Vatican had “failed yet again to acknowledge and take responsibility for its role in facilitating a culture of cover-up which has caused the sexual abuse of so many children”.

The Rape Crisis Network of Ireland said the report was welcome but was not a substitute for accountability to State structures.

Taoiseach Enda Kenny said he was satisfied from his discussions with church authorities that it was giving full co-operation on child protection issues.

Speaking outside the White House after his meeting with US president Barack Obama, Mr Kenny said every agency working with children had a duty and a responsibility to work in full compliance with the Government as it worked to set in place proper child protection through a referendum to be held later this year.

Fianna Fáil said the report offered no new perspective on the abuse crisis but it highlighted the need for prompter action on a range of concrete child protection measures.

Sinn Féin said the report failed to acknowledge the full responsibility of church institutions.

Archbishop of Tuam Dr Michael Neary described the Vatican report as “positive”.



Quote:
Early indications that summary would be primarily pastoral in nature
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2012/0321/1224313641992.html
Wed, Mar 21, 2012

ANALYSIS: The report amounted to a fleshing out of the pope’s analysis in his letter to the Irish faithful, writes PATSY McGARRY

A PARTICULARLY informed Catholic has described the Summary of the Findings of the Apostolic Visitation in Ireland, published yesterday, as “a damp squid”.

He said so by text yesterday afternoon. In so far as all squids are the same, being damp, the man’s point was all the more accurate even if what he said was a malapropism.

There was an undoubted sense of sameness, and accompanying disappointment, at the content of the 7½ page summary of reports on the Irish church prepared for the Vatican by some of its heavy hitters in last year’s visitation.

This “damp squid” reaction would seem to have been anticipated by the church leadership in Ireland as Cardinal Brady emphasised at the press conference in Maynooth that the purpose of the unprecedented visitation to the Irish Catholic Church was primarily “pastoral in nature”. The pope’s intention was that “it should assist the local church on he path of renewal,” he said. Expectations, however, were so much greater than that.

The now usual, if still welcome, expressions of shame and remorse as well as firm purposes of amendment were repeated by the Irish church leadership. When it came to concrete steps towards radical change in the culture of clercalism which was at the root of so much cover-up of child sex abuse by church authorities in Ireland, there was little. Rather, what was presented seemed more like retrenchment and withdrawal than a radical reaching out.

That there were such high expectations in the first place was probably, in part at least, rooted in that unquenchable hope still harboured by those children of the spirit of Vatican II who, despite everything, continue to believe their day will come.

More significantly, however, and what gave expectations in this context such legs was the very fact that the visitation to the Irish church was announced by Pope Benedict in his, also unprecedented, pastoral letter to the Catholics of Ireland, published two years ago yesterday.

Then the visitation teams, when announced, were impressive. Their leaders included church heavy-hitters such as then archbishop of New York, president of the the US Conference of Catholic Bishops and now Cardinal Timothy Dolan; Cardinal Seán O’Malley Archbishop of Boston; the former archbishop of Westminster Cardinal Cormac Murphy O’Connor; the Archbishop of Toronto, now Cardinal Thomas Collins and the Archbishop of Ottawa Terence Prendergast.

But those who had high expectations may really have only themselves to blame. They ought to have paid more attention to those other paragraphs in the pope’s letter of two years ago.

They would have noticed there what his expectations were. He commented there how in recent decades in the Irish church “the sacramental and devotional practices that sustain faith and enable it to grow, such as frequent confession, daily prayer and annual retreats, were neglected. Significant too was the tendency during this period, also on the part of priests and religious, to adopt ways of thinking and assessing secular realities without sufficient reference to the Gospel.”

He said: “The programme of renewal proposed by the Second Vatican Council was sometimes misinterpreted and indeed, in the light of the profound social changes that were taking place, it was far from easy to know how best to implement it.

“In particular, there was a well-intentioned but misguided tendency to avoid penal approaches to canonically irregular situations.”

Among contributing factors to the abuse scandal, he said, were “inadequate procedures for determining the suitability of candidates for the priesthood and the religious life; insufficient human, moral, intellectual and spiritual formation in seminaries and novitiates . . .”

What we got yesterday was a fleshing out of the pope’s analysis. Should anyone, really, have expected anything more?
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PostPosted: 21-03-2012 15:58    Post subject: Reply with quote

Back in the old days if there had been a major to-do associated with the Church, the offender would usually strip to his shorts and publicly walk the streets scourging himself with a cat o' nine tails.

I say it's time for that old tradition to be revived.
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PostPosted: 07-05-2012 11:40    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Association of Catholic Priests discuss Church's future
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-17973830

The Association of Catholic Priests represents more than 850 of the 4,500 priests on the island of Ireland.

Related Stories

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Priest will continue to speak out
Irish 'support married priests'

An organisation which represents more than 850 priests in Ireland will hold a meeting on Monday to discuss the future direction of the Catholic Church.

The Vatican has recently criticised leading members of the Association of Catholic Priests (ACP) for expressing views which contradict Church teaching.

The ACP meeting comes at a turbulent time for the Church in Ireland.

Its leader, Cardinal Sean Brady, is facing calls to resign over his handling of a clerical sex abuse case.

Change
The ACP meeting, entitled "Towards an Assembly of the Irish Catholic Church", will take place at hotel in Dublin.

It has been described as a first effort to bring people together to discuss the current state of Catholic Church in Ireland which has been rocked in recent years by a series of high profile child abuse scandals.

During that period, a number of priests have openly expressed their desire for change in Church rules on matters such as clerical celibacy, the ordination of women and the ban on contraception.

However, in recent months, some of Ireland's most vocal, liberal priests have been disciplined by the Vatican's Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF).

They include leading ACP member, Father Tony Flannery, and the broadcaster and newspaper columnist Fr Brian D'Arcy.

Fr Flannery, who is based in County Galway, was ordered to stop writing articles for a Redemptorist Order magazine to which he had contributed for 14 years.

Fr D'Arcy was told he must get prior approval to write or broadcast on topics dealing with church doctrine.

Revelations
In the run-up to Easter, Pope Benedict warned that the Church would not tolerate priests speaking out against Catholic teaching.


The leader of the Catholic Church in Ireland, Cardinal Sean Brady, has faced calls to resign
Last week, a BBC documentary uncovered new revelations about an internal Church investigation into clerical child sex abuse in 1975.

It said a teenage boy who had been sexually abused by Fr Brendan Smyth gave the names and addresses of other children who were at risk from the paedophile priest to Cardinal Brady, who at that time was a 36-year-old priest.

He passed the allegations to his superiors but did not inform the police or the children's parents.

Fr Smyth continued to sexually assault one of the boys for a year after that.

He also abused the boy's sister for seven years, and four of his cousins, up until 1988.

The ACP recently commissioned a survey of Irish Catholics which found that 90% would support the introduction of married priests.

The survey also found that 77% of Irish Catholics want women to be ordained, while more than 60% disagreed with Church teaching that gay relationships were immoral.

At the time, Fr Brendan Hoban from the ACP said the results were proof that the perception of Irish Catholics as traditionalist, conservative and resistant to change was wrong.
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PostPosted: 25-05-2012 19:09    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Archdiocese paid €15.2m in compensation and legal fees in sex abuse cases
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2012/0525/1224316664957.html
PATSY McGARRY, Religious Affairs Correspondent

Fri, May 25, 2012
DUBLIN’S CATHOLIC archdiocese has paid €15.2 million in compensation and legal costs arising from clerical child sexual abuse, according to a report published yesterday.

This included €10.3 million in settlements and €4.9 million in legal costs.

To date 199 civil actions have been taken in Dublin arising from clerical child abuse, with 135 concluded and 64 ongoing.

The archdiocese has so far received 97 allegations/reports of suspicions of abuse against the worst priest serial child abuser in Dublin. He is no longer a priest and is currently serving a lengthy prison sentence.

The next-worst priest abuser has been the subject of 46 such allegations/reported suspicions, followed by two priest who are subject to 39 allegations/reported suspicions each.

In all, the archdiocese yesterday published figures for the 10 worst serial child abusers among its priests. The two least-worst such priests face 12 allegations/suspicions each. They were disclosed as part of the archdiocese’s Child Safeguarding and Protection Service (CSPS) annual update of information related to abuse.

Since last year there have been allegations of child sexual abuse against a further four priests of the archdiocese not previously the subject of complaints. And a report of suspected child sexual abuse against a fifth priest not previously the subject of complaints was made. The total number of priests of the archdiocese against whom allegations of child sexual abuse have been recorded has reached 98, 10 of whom have been convicted in the courts.

The figures relate to a period of more than 70 years during which approximately 1,350 priests served in Dublin.

In 2011 almost 1,000 people in Dublin parishes took part in child protection training and information sessions, while more than 26,300 people, including bishops, priests, parish workers etc have been vetted by gardaí.

A CSPS analysis of the 98 priests against whom allegations have been made found that 2 per cent were alleged to have last abused in the 1940s, 4 per cent in the 1950s, 23 per cent in the 1960s, 27 per cent in the 1970s, 34 per cent in the 1980s, 9 per cent in the 1990s, and 1 per cent in the 2000s.

Among those who attended the launch of these new figures in Dublin yesterday were Archbishop Diarmuid Martin, CSPS director Andrew Fagan and child protection officer Sinéad McDonnell.

Mr Fagan noted the figures showed “a sharp decline in the level of incidents of abuse recorded since the 1980s”.

But, he warned that “while the majority of allegations of abuse reported to us now relate to sexual abuse which may have occurred many years ago, it is still crucial to be vigilant and to ensure standards are maintained”.

Child protection operated “to a high standard” in Dublin and “parishes are now safer places for children”. Archbishop Martin said there was “now no priest in ministry in Dublin about whom, if expressions of concern have been received, the gardaí and the HSE are not fully informed”.

He took consolation from figures indicating a sharp drop in allegations made against Dublin priests this century which, he suggested, was a result of more effective child safeguarding practices. This was particularly so as studies indicated that the level of paedophilia in society remained a constant, he said.

The decline in such allegations could also be attributed to improved screening processes in seminaries, he said, while “in the seminary itself there is further screening”. But he had no explanation for the high incidence of allegations in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s.

Separately, he said eight men are to be ordained deacons next month. This was “not about substituting for priests”, he said.
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PostPosted: 11-06-2012 11:47    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
No time for celebration, say clerical abuse survivors and gay rights group
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2012/0611/1224317692250.html
FIONA GARTLAND

Mon, Jun 11, 2012

PROTESTS: MORE THAN 100 people from a variety of organisations protested yesterday outside the opening Mass of the Eucharistic Congress in Dublin.

The event attracted more than 20,000 participants from around the world. Protests were held at all three entrances of Dublin’s RDS.

Carrying a yellow-and-white papal flag with the words “Vatican flag of Shame” on it, members of Irish Survivors of Child Abuse (Soca) gathered at the Simmonscourt Gate. John Kelly, co-ordinator of Soca, said they had decided to hold a small and dignified protest.

“We are representing the victims here today; emotions are very high and if they had come themselves, anything could have happened,” he said.

It was not yet a time for celebration and renewal in the church, Mr Kelly added. “It is time for examination of the past and of the people who are in control of the present.”

He called for the resignation of Cardinal Seán Brady, Primate of All Ireland, who was involved in an investigation into paedophile priest Fr Brendan Smyth in the 1970s.

At the Angelsea Road entrance, more than 50 protesters held up signs calling for equality for members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.

Max Krzyzanowski, organiser with campaign group LGBT Noise, said the Catholic Church involved itself heavily in political and secular matters in the Republic. “We feel it is time for clear demarcation between religious affairs and secular society,” he said.

Cardinal Brady had demanded the inclusion of a “conscience clause” in recent civil partnership legislation which allowed civil registrars to refuse to officiate at same-sex civil partnerships.

“It’s interesting to note this conscience was not apparent to him when he was forcing children to sign confidentiality agreements concerning the abuse they suffered at the hands of clerics,” Mr Krzyzanowski added.

Mark Fitzpatrick of Reformation Ireland, an all-Ireland Christian organisation, handed leaflets to those entering through the Simmonscourt gate. The organisation was present not to protest but “to be of help to people”, he said.

At the same gate, Brendan Doris, from Lucan in Dublin, protested with his family about the name of his children’s local school, Archbishop Ryan National School, in Balgaddy. It was named after Archbishop Dermot Ryan, who was criticised in the Murphy report on child sexual abuse for his handling of abuse cases.

“How can we discuss child protection in a school so named?” he asked.

At the main entrance to the congress, Seán Irsach, a child abuse survivor, said he wanted those attending to know the Catholic Church had raped and abused quite freely and were a “law unto themselves”.

“I’d like to see the whole Catholic Church closed down for once and for all,” he said.
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PostPosted: 23-06-2012 09:52    Post subject: Reply with quote

A start, maybe now we'll see bishops and cardinals in the dock.

Quote:
US Catholic priest convicted of sex abuse cover-up
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-18560069

Monsignor William Lynn supervised about 800 priests in the Philadelphia area

Related Stories

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A high-ranking Philadelphia Roman Catholic Church official has been found guilty of endangering the welfare of a child in a sex abuse case.

Monsignor William Lynn was acquitted of two additional charges.

Prosecutors alleged that Lynn, who supervised hundreds of priests, helped cover-up child sex abuse, often by transferring priests to new parishes.

He is now the highest-ranking US Roman Catholic official convicted in connection in a wider scandal.

Child sex abuse cases across Roman Catholic churches in the US have cost billions in settlements, driving some US dioceses into bankruptcy.

The jury deliberated for 13 days but was unable to deliver a verdict against a co-defendant, Rev James Brennan, accused of sexually abusing a 14-year-old boy.

Lynn has been on leave from the Church since his arrest in 2012.

Predator list
Lynn was convicted specifically of endangering the victim of Edward Avery, a former priest convicted in 1999 of sexual assault.

The secretary for clergy had declared Avery guilty of an earlier complaint by 1994, and helped steer him into a treatment programme. But he also knew that Avery was later sent to live in a new parish, where he assaulted an altar boy.

Lynn was found not guilty of another charge of child endangerment and conspiracy.

As secretary for clergy from 1992 to 2004, Lynn was in charge of supervising about 800 priests in the Philadelphia archdiocese, including investigating sex abuse claims.

Lynn told parishes with suspected predators that their priests were being removed for health reasons and then sent the men to unsuspecting churches, prosecutors said.

Defence lawyers argued that Lynn alone tried to document the complaints, to get priests into treatment and to alert higher Church officials to the growing crisis.

Central to but physically absent from the case was Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua, who ran the archdiocese.

The trial exposed how involved the cardinal, who died in January, was in dealing with accused priests.

Bevilacqua had the final say on what happened to the priests, ordering many to be transferred to new parishes. He also ordered the shredding of a 1994 list of three diagnosed paedophiles and a dozen confirmed predators in the archdiocese, according to testimony.

Philadelphia is the sixth largest US archdiocese, with 1.5 million members.
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 05-09-2012 20:41    Post subject: Reply with quote

More revelations, the song remains the same.

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Bishop of Clonfert sorry for moving two abusive priests
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/breaking/2012/0905/breaking13.html
IRISH TIMES REPORTERS

The Bishop of Clonfert has apologised for moving two priests from one parish to another in the 1990s after they abused children.

Dr John Kirby said he had a lack of understanding about the sinister and recidivist nature of the child abuser and the lifelong damage that the destructive behaviour has on victims. ...


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Spiritans criticised over abuse response
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/breaking/2012/0905/breaking24.html?via=rel
PATSY MCGARRY, Religious Affairs Correspondent

Wed, Sep 05, 2012

A review of child safeguarding practices in the Holy Ghost congregation has found that 142 abuse allegations had been made against 47 Spiritan or Holy Ghost priests since January 1st 1975.

Eight of the priests are still alive, with three out of ministry.

Three Spiritan priests have been convicted of abuse in the courts.

The review found that that Spiritan case files made for “very sad reading”, with evidence that there were serial abusers who worked in school communities in Ireland who “went undetected and unchecked giving them unmonitored access to children during the 1960s, 70s and 80s.” ...


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Allegations against 27 Dominican friars
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/breaking/2012/0905/breaking27.html?via=rel
FIONA GARTLAND

Wed, Sep 05, 2012

Allegations of sexual abuse were made against 27 Dominican friars since 1975, a report published this morning has said.

The Review of Safeguarding Practice in the Irish Province of Dominican Friars, carried out by the National Board for Safeguarding Children in the Catholic Church in Ireland found 52 allegations had been reported to gardaí and the Health Service Executive.

Two friars have been convicted of offences against children since 1975.

Some 12 of the 27 friars against whom allegations were made were still alive at the time to the review.

Four of the friars were recorded as “out of ministry, but still members of the order”, a further four had left the order and four more were either still in ministry or retired.


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Diocese told to review child policy
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/breaking/2012/0905/breaking33.html?via=rel
Wed, Sep 05, 2012

Bishop Donal Buckley has been told to ensure that the diocese of Cork and Ross reviews and, if necessary, revises its safeguarding children policy document.

The National Board for Safeguarding Children in the Catholic Church (NBSCCC) audit found that the advice was written in 2009, two years before the Diocesan Child Protection Committee had sight of two important national documents, Children First, and the HSE Child Protection and Welfare Practice Handbook.

Another issue it flagged up was that the diocese does not set out timeframes for resolving child abuse complaints.

The audit stated that allegations have been made against 26 priests in the diocese since 1975, and eight of the clerics have died.

Three priests - including two with convictions for paedophilia - have been laicised, five are out of ministry or on restricted duties, seven retired and another three returned to ministry after complaints were investigated.

Some 50 complaints of child abuse were received by gardai and 51 by health authorities, the report said.


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New complaints of abuse by Missionaries
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/breaking/2012/0905/breaking46.html?via=rel
Wed, Sep 05, 2012

The audit of Missionaries of the Sacred Heart (MSC) files was suspended after a day last August when it emerged admissions of child clerical abuse had not been reported to gardaí or health chiefs and that the incoming Provincial was unaware of the case files.

Records showed 17 alleged perpetrators were known to the society between the late 1940s and early 1990s, but that the number of victims continues to grow as new complaints are received.

Gardaí are said to be close to concluding their investigations.

The NBSCCC criticised practices within the society, which they found deeply flawed and contributed to one man’s death by suicide.

People in positions of leadership failed to protect vulnerable young people and had a culture of secrecy, which worked in favour of those who wanted to continue to prey on children, it disclosed. ...


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Full texts of seven reports.
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/breaking/2012/0905/breaking13.html#docs
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CochiseOffline
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PostPosted: 06-09-2012 11:01    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's all very sad , but I note many of these reports talk about 'allegations' - which of course is highly unsatisfactory. Or is that the point you are making, that most of these 'allegations' never get followed up/proved one way or another?

There used to be an idea that children never made up this kind of allegation, but we now know this to be untrue, at least for older children, who have been shown on occasion to make up such allegations out of spite. And we have the whole false/planted memory syndrome. Plus no doubt genuine cases of abuse - it would be equally surprising if , in as large an organisation as the church, the occasional abuser did not exist.

I'm not attempting to defend the church, just the opposite - it would be much better if these allegations were fully investigated and the cloud of suspicion resolved one way or the other.
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 06-09-2012 11:41    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cochise wrote:
It's all very sad , but I note many of these reports talk about 'allegations' - which of course is highly unsatisfactory. Or is that the point you are making, that most of these 'allegations' never get followed up/proved one way or another?

There used to be an idea that children never made up this kind of allegation, but we now know this to be untrue, at least for older children, who have been shown on occasion to make up such allegations out of spite. And we have the whole false/planted memory syndrome. Plus no doubt genuine cases of abuse - it would be equally surprising if , in as large an organisation as the church, the occasional abuser did not exist.

I'm not attempting to defend the church, just the opposite - it would be much better if these allegations were fully investigated and the cloud of suspicion resolved one way or the other.


False allegations are made and I'm sure that some of the allegations above are likely to be false.

But there is a pattern of cover up by the RCC.

The individual reports above show how far investigations have progressed as do previous reports on this thread..

Last year it was reported that the PSNI were investigating 170 such cases. I don't have such figures for Garda investigations.

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Church and abuse: Previous reports
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/breaking/2012/0905/breaking43.html?via=rel
Wed, Sep 05, 2012

The following is a summary of previous reports on abuse in the Catholic Church

FERNS REPORT (OCTOBER 2005)

Investigated complaints made by 100 people against 21 priests, among them Seán Fortune. It strongly criticised the Catholic Church’s handling of allegations of child sexual abuse over a period of 40 years. From the 1960s until 1980, the report found Bishop Donal Herlihy regarded priests who sexually abused children “as guilty of moral misconduct” but said he did not seem to recognise “the wrongdoing was a serious criminal offence”. His successor, Dr Brendan Comiskey, “failed to recognise the paramount need to protect children, as a matter of urgency, from potential abusers” and the report accused him of providing erroneous information to one Garda inquiry and failing to co-operate fully with another.

MURPHY REPORT (NOVEMBER 2009)

Investigated cases involving 46 priests and more than 320 children, most of them boys. It found four successive archbishops of the Dublin archdiocese had handled allegations of child sexual abuse with “denial, arrogance and cover-up” and did not report the abuse to gardaí. It said the structures of the church facilitated the cover- up of abuse.

RYAN REPORT (MAY 2009)

Found that thousands of children suffered physical and sexual abuse over several decades in 216 residential institutions run by religious orders, implicating more than 800 priests, brothers, nuns and lay people. The Department of Education was found to have failed to carry out its “statutory duty of inspection” out of deference towards the religious congregation. The report said the religious congregations were not prepared to accept responsibility for the sexual abuse carried out by their members and did not listen to or believe people who complained of sexual abuse.

CLOYNE REPORT (JULY 2011)

Investigated allegations and complaints of clerical child sexual abuse between 1996 and early 2009 concerning 19 clerics. It deemed the response of the Cloyne diocese inadequate and inappropriate. It found that, in nine cases, complaints which should have been reported to gardaí were not while none of the complaints between 1996 and 2008 were reported to the HSE. It accused the Vatican of giving comfort to dissenters within the church to the Irish bishops’ procedures for handling child sexual abuse and revealed that, in a secret letter to the bishops, the Vatican described the 1996 rules as “merely a study document”.


CHILD ABUSE AUDIT (December 2011)

Independent reviews into the past handling of sex abuse in six Catholic dioceses – Raphoe, Derry, Dromore , Kilmore, Ardagh Clonmacnois and Tuam archdiocese – by the National Board for Safeguarding Children in the Catholic Church. A total of 164 allegations of child abuse were made against 85 priests in the six dioceses since 1975. The diocese of Raphoe came in for the heaviest criticism with the review concluding that “significant errors of judgment” were made by successive bishops in responding to the allegations. The diocese of Kilmore was described as a “model of best practice” in child protection. Overall the audit found “major improvements” in safeguarding practice in recent times.
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