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ramonmercadoOnline
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PostPosted: 17-04-2011 12:02    Post subject: Reply with quote

So its ok by the mail not to pay taxes but watch for the welfare scroungers.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 23-05-2011 10:48    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Tax haven toll bridge sells for £1 million
An 18th century toll bridge over the River Thames governed by its own Act of Parliament which makes it a tax haven has sold for more than £1 million at auction.
By Chris Irvine
Published: 4:33PM GMT 03 Dec 2009

The tax free status of Swinford Toll Bridge, which is located in David Cameron's constituency near Eynsham, Oxfordshire, is enshrined in laws from King George III's reign.

The owner of the Grade II*-Listed bridge is exempt from paying income tax, capital gains tax, inheritance tax or VAT thanks to the law passed in 1767 granting private ownership to the Earl of Abingdon.

(P.2 of this thread)

Here's another one!

For sale, the tax haven bridge where owner can earn £2,000 a week in tolls
By Daily Mail Reporter
Last updated at 9:07 AM on 23rd May 2011

It is the Monaco of the West Midlands - a private toll bridge which is spared paying income tax on its profits.
Motorists spend up to £2,000 per week crossing the 18th century bridge at Whitney-on-Wye, between Hereford and Hay-on-Wye.

And following the death of its owner, the Herefordshire tax haven has now been placed on the market for a starting price of £450,000.
A stretch of river bank and a grade II-listed cottage with a sitting tenant, the toll keeper, are included in the price.
It also acts as an inheritance tax shelter, so it can be passed on to heirs without falling prey to a levy.

The 1779-built bridge, which currently costs 80p to cross, was initially funded privately. In return, an act of parliament granted it tax exemption.
Prospective owners will also forfeit having to pay stamp duty, business rates and capital gains tax. But they will have to pay for its maintenance and the toll keeper's wages.

Humberts Leisure is marketing the property and hopes it will attract investors interested in its unique tax status.
Brian Howard, former chairman of the Howard Group, the property company, bought the bridge for £300,000 in 2002.
He introduced an automatic barrier to replace the booth where the bridge keeper would sit and the 'honesty box' used at night.

Mr Howard died last year and the bridge is now being sold as part of his estate by his son-in-law, Nicholas Bewes, managing director of the company.
Mr Bewes, 44, told The Sunday Times: 'It has been a very good investment for the family.'

Jennie Harrison, whose husband Mike regularly drives his 1932 Bentley sports coupé across the bridge, added: 'It is a pleasant way of driving into Hay. You have to weigh up the toll but it is a way to save petrol.'

A stone bridge which crosses the River Thames, at Swinford in Oxfordshire, sold for more than £1 million in 2009. It generates an estimated £190,000 each year from the four million travellers who use it.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1389670/Tax-haven-bridge-Whitney-Wye-Herefordshire-sale.html#ixzz1NAfrkDjh
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PostPosted: 10-06-2011 07:57    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just when you'd decided to give up flying and holiday in the UK...

Cornwall £1-a-night 'tourist tax' plan by council director

Tourists could be taxed £1 towards the Cornwall infrastructure for each night of their stay under plans raised at Westminster.
Corporate director for the economy, Tom Flanagan said Cornwall's population swells from 500,000 to five million in summer, putting pressure on the county.
On Wednesday he told a select committee that the fee could raise £26m a year.
Cornwall Council said it was one of a range of ideas being looked at.

Mr Flanagan also suggested to the Communities and Local Government Select Committee that the 10% council tax discount on second home owners should be axed.

He said the £1-a night charge would be a "contribution to improve the tourist experience" but finding a way of collecting it could prove problematic.
A balance had to be made, and he did not want to discourage tourists, he added.

Malcolm Bell of Visit Cornwall said: "I don't think a blunt tax would achieve the objective."
Tim Reed runs Tredethick Farm Cottages, near Lostwithiel and said it was a "dangerous" proposal.
He said £1 did not sound a large amount but it would soon add up and it could negatively affect the tourism industry.

Mayor of Newquay Andy Hannan said: "It puts Cornwall at a disadvantage compared to the rest of the country.
"To levy an extra tax, it puts the businesses in our county at a disadvantage."

A Cornwall Council spokesperson told BBC News the idea had not been discussed with councillors and it was one of a range of ideas that was being looked at.
It was not council policy, they added.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-13712398
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PostPosted: 13-09-2011 20:56    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some good news, for some islanders

Europe approves remote islands fuel duty discount

Plans for a motor fuel duty discount for remote island communities have been approved by the European Commission.
The UK government scheme for islands of the Inner and Outer Hebrides, the Northern Isles, the islands in the Clyde and the Isles of Scilly was accepted by Brussels.
The 5p per litre tax discount will apply to fuel consumed on the islands.
Government sources said it could take a number of months for the scheme to be implemented.

The European Commission said rates of taxation on petrol and diesel could be reduced as proposed by ministers.
The announcement is expected to be welcomed by motorists who have been calling for a cut in prices for years.
Fuel on the affected islands is on average 10p more per litre than in other parts of the UK.

UK ministers are not allowed to cut fuel duty without getting permission from Brussels first. Rolling Eyes

In March, Chief Secretary to the Treasury Danny Alexander, who is Lib Dem MP for Inverness, Nairn, Badenoch and Strathspey, said permission to introduce the discount for island communities had been sought from the European Commission.
A spokesman for the Treasury, which will now have to introduce the scheme, said: "The European Commission decision is a positive step towards delivering cheaper fuel to remote island communities.
"The UK government is working to secure the final agreement of member states and get savings at the pump as quickly as possible."

European Finance ministers will also have to agree it at their next meeting.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-14907283
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 15-01-2012 15:21    Post subject: Reply with quote

I will survive! Accountant in £5m celebrity tax scam taunts Revenue and Customs with new lyrics to disco classic
By Alex Hawkes and Martin Delgado
Last updated at 3:14 AM on 15th January 2012

An accountant who is facing jail after being convicted of a tax scam that netted him almost £5 million wrote his own version of the Gloria Gaynor song I Will Survive to taunt Revenue inspectors.
David Perrin changed the lyrics of the 1978 disco classic to entertain friends and colleagues at a tax-avoidance seminar organised by his firm, Vantis Tax.
In its original form, I Will Survive describes a woman’s discovery that she no longer needs a lover who spurned her. But Perrin twisted it into a mocking tribute to greed.

The 46-year-old, whose clients included City bankers and sports stars, enriched himself by illegally exploiting tax rules covering charity donations.
His version of the Gaynor hit was found on his personal computer when tax inspectors raided his home in Luton, Bedfordshire. He amended the song’s lyrics to:

At first I was afraid, I was petrified.
Kept think Clerkenwell and Modia [two firms caught up in the scam] were suicide.
But then I spent so many nights thinking how much cash we made
And we got paid
Almost as good as getting laid.
They should have changed that stupid law,
They should have b******d charity
But they have left that lovely tax relief
For folks to pay to me.
Weren’t you the ones who said that you’d shaft us with a GAAR? [General Anti-Avoidance Rule, a measure aimed a closing tax loopholes.]
You may think you’ve got cojones
We’ve got bigger balls by far.

A source involved in the investigation said: ‘Perrin spent thousands of pounds installing recording equipment at his home. He recorded the song himself and when it was played at the seminar, someone in drag got up on stage and lip-synched the words into a microphone.’

Perrin, a former tax official, exploited the Government’s Gift Aid scheme to help wealthy individuals offset their 40 per cent higher-rate tax liabilities.
Perrin ran the racket when he was deputy managing director of Vantis Tax, which collapsed in 2010, owing the Revenue £10 million.

Vantis clients include England and Manchester United footballer Wayne Rooney, former England rugby union captain Martin Corry and singer Yusuf Islam, who used to be known as Cat Stevens.
There is no suggestion that they knew anything about the scam.

Perrin spent his share of the cash on expensive homes, exotic holidays, works of art and sports cars.
A Vantis employee involved in setting up the tax dodge was given a Porsche Cayenne as a reward.

Revenue and Customs chief Dave Hartnett said yesterday: ‘This was a cynical fraud and an outrageous abuse of professional position, exploiting the tax breaks put in place to support charities and their vital work.
‘We will always pursue tax advisers who act fraudulently in order to line the pockets of crooks at the expense of the honest public.’

Perrin was convicted last week of ‘dishonestly submitting, facilitating and inducing others to submit claims for tax relief’.
The jury at Blackfriars Crown Court in Central London could not reach a verdict on whether fellow Vantis executive Robert Faichney, 53, was also involved. He may face a retrial. Both men were cleared on the judge’s direction of cheating the Revenue.
Confiscation proceedings against Perrin have started and he will be sentenced next month.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2086768/I-survive-Accountant-5m-celebrity-tax-scam-taunts-Revenue-remake-disco-classic.html#ixzz1jXXIJb8w
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 24-01-2012 10:18    Post subject: Reply with quote

How the dog with a Monaco bank account led police to Redknapp's secret 'bungs'
Court told Spurs manager used his offshore account 'deliberately and dishonestly'
Paul Peachey Tuesday 24 January 2012

One of Britain's most high-profile football managers, Harry
Redknapp, flew to Monaco to set up a secret offshore bank account
named after his pet dog to receive bungs of nearly £200,000 and
hide them from the taxman, a court heard yesterday.

Mr Redknapp – the Tottenham Hotspur manager tipped to become England's next boss – flew to the principality with its tradition of banking secrecy to obscure a money trail and "deliberately and dishonestly" received two large payments from the chairman of his then employers, Portsmouth Football Club, Southwark Crown Court heard.

The 64-year-old only revealed the existence of the secret account after the end of a separate two-year tax investigation into a £300,000 bonus paid to him after a transfer involving the former England captain Rio Ferdinand, the court heard.

John Black QC, prosecuting, said Mr Redknapp's "hard-headed business acumen" had seen him earn an annual salary of up to £500,000 and bonus payments of many hundreds of thousands more.

Mr Redknapp was named director of football at Portsmouth in 2001 and had a clause in his contract entitling him to 10 per cent of any profits made from the sale of players. But when he was appointed manager in 2002, his contract was renegotiated and he only got five per cent, the court heard.

Days later the club agreed the sale of England striker Peter Crouch for £4.5 million to Aston Villa, netting Mr Redknapp more than £115,000, half of what he could have earned under his old contract.

Mr Redknapp did not wait long before he took steps to get what he thought he was due, said Mr Black. The prosecution alleges that four days after the bonus was signed off by a senior executive, Mr Redknapp flew to Monaco to set up a private bank account at HSBC under the name "Rosie 47", which combined his dog's name with his date of birth, said Mr Black. The owner and chairman of Portsmouth Football Club, Milan Mandaric, made payments to Mr Redknapp of $145,000 (£93,000) in June 2002 and $150,000 in April 2004, the court was told . "These payments were a bung or offshore bonus that the parties had absolutely no intention of paying taxes for," said Mr Black.

Mr Black said that under the terms of the new contract, any sums from transfer activity would be paid directly from Mr Mandaric, rather than the club as had happened previously. Mr Black said the off-record payments "would be hidden from the UK tax authorities".

Mr Redknapp yesterday sat in the dock alongside Mr Mandaric, 73. Both men deny two counts of tax evasion.

etc...

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/crime/how-the-dog-with-a-monaco-bank-account-led-police-to-redknapps-secret-bungs-6293674.html
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ramonmercadoOnline
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PostPosted: 24-01-2012 12:33    Post subject: Reply with quote

Using his dog in this manner was bad, I wonder if the revenue had a lead? Well, they collared him. I hope they curtail his activities,
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PostPosted: 19-02-2012 07:44    Post subject: Reply with quote

How Moira Stuart makes sure tax doesn't have to be taxing
Moira Stuart, the BBC newsreader who has become the public face of HM Revenue & Customs, has set up a company that allows her to avoid the full impact of the 50p top tax rate.
By Robert Watts, Deputy Political Editor
9:00PM GMT 18 Feb 2012

As the public face of HM Revenue & Customs, she tells people that "tax doesn't have to be taxing". Now Moira Stuart appears to have found a way to apply this slogan to her own financial affairs.

The BBC newsreader, who appears on the Revenue's television and radio adverts, has set up a company that allows her to avoid the full impact of the 50p top tax rate. The firm legally entitles her to pay corporation tax at 21 per cent on some of her earnings, rather than income tax at up to 50 per cent.

Details of the structure emerge as the Treasury investigates how many people who work for government departments are employing similar techniques to lower their tax bills.
The Department of Heath has already been found to have paid 25 senior staff in this way. Earlier this month, the head of the Student Loans Company was found to have been paid through a company, reportedly allowing him to legally save as much as £40,000 a year in tax.

Miss Stuart, 62, has been a household name since the early 1980s, when she became the BBC's first Afro-Caribbean newsreader. For the past two years she has read the news on Chris Evans' breakfast show on BBC Radio 2.

Companies House filings reveal that Miss Stuart is the sole director and shareholder of Moira Stuart Limited, which was created in April 2010, a few days before Labour's 50 per cent top tax rate was introduced.

The firm's accounts reveal that £22,607 was paid into the company in 2010/11. After £1,749 of administrative expenses were taken into account, Miss Stuart paid corporation tax on this income of £4,380.
Had these earnings been subject to income tax she would have incurred a bill of up to £11,303. She may also have been liable for National Insurance contributions.

Service companies have a range of tax advantages and have become common amongst BBC presenters, footballers and other high earners in recent years.
As well as paying corporation tax rather than income tax, they allow people to write off office costs, clothing and a host of other goods and services associated with their work for tax purposes.
Meanwhile employers who pay people through a service company can avoid paying National Insurance on these workers.

However, HM Revenue and Customs has taken action against people who it judges to be "disguised employees" – forcing them to pay income tax and national insurance as if they were an employee.
A spokesman for HMRC said: "Moira Stewart works on specific advertising campaigns for HMRC. She is not employed directly by us so there is no question of disguised employment." Rolling Eyes He would not comment on tax rate paid by Miss Stuart for her HMRC work.
The newsreader and the BBC also declined to comment on the arrangement.

...

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/tvandradio/bbc/9090976/How-Moira-Stuart-makes-sure-tax-doesnt-have-to-be-taxing.html
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PostPosted: 19-02-2012 09:22    Post subject: Reply with quote

a) It's perfectly legal for someone working freelance. b) I guess several of the DM's own columnists have similar arrangements. c) They're assuming that she would be on the 50% tax rate....

Note weasel words "up to".... they don't know what she earns.

Just the DM stirring it again.
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ramonmercadoOnline
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PostPosted: 19-02-2012 19:01    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now Italian tax inspectors dont have cold feet when it comes to going after tax evaders.

Quote:
Italian tax collectors don skis for spot-checks in Alpine resort
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/feb/19/italy-tax-collectors-raid-ski-resort

Courmayeur latest target in crackdown against businesses not issuing proper receipts, a practice costing Italy €120bn a year

Andrea Vogt in Bologna
guardian.co.uk, Sunday 19 February 2012 16.15 GMT

In Courmayeur, Italy, undercover tax agents took to the slopes during operation to check whether eateries in the resort were issuing receipts. Photograph: Corbis
Italian authorities have taken the fight against tax cheats to new heights, with undercover inspectors donning skis to check whether the highest eateries in the Alps were issuing receipts.

The weekend blitz in the resort of Courmayeur was the latest in a list of high-profile undercover tax operations that read like locations of a thriller: Christmas in Cortina, the carnival of Viareggio, nightclubs in Milan, Valentine's Day in San Remo and the street markets of Naples.

The message: there is a new sheriff in town, his name is Mario Monti, and there was no place left to hide. With skis strapped on, the tax inspectors seemed no different from the tourists riding up the lifts. But tThe dozen or so agents' goal was to monitor whether receipts were being issued in the high-altitude huts on the flanks of Mont Blanc, known as Monte Bianco in Italy, where VIPs stop in for grappa and hot chocolate. Another 60 colleagues performed similar spot-checks in the village below.

While such crackdowns have broad appeal among most Italians, at least one VIP in Courmayeur was unimpressed. "They are trying to flex their muscles," Daniela Santanché, a former undersecretary in the cabinet of the ex-prime minister Silvio Berlusconi, told the Corriere della Sera newspaper. The administration, under Mario Monti, is battling hard against Italy's public debt crisis, pushing through an austerity package. Last week, the government announced plans to tax the Catholic church's solely commercial properties.

In Italy, discounts are sometimes offered for cash and in exchange, shops and professionals do not issue receipts, thereby avoiding taxes.

The entrenched practice cost the Italian treasury an estimated €120bn (£100bn) a year. A crackdown by the Agenzia delle Entrate, Italy's tax collection agency, and the guardia di finanzia, the fiscal police, recovered nearly €12bn last year. The latest tax raids began on 30 December in the ski town of Cortina, where spot-checks of 251 luxury cars showed some Ferrari owners reported earning less than €30,000 a year. After a similar swoop in Rome's shopping district on 28 January, 400 agents raided 115 locales in Milan and the following day, 386 commercial operations in Naples, 82% of which were not issuing proper receipts.
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PostPosted: 26-02-2012 08:31    Post subject: Reply with quote

Timble2 wrote:
a) It's perfectly legal for someone working freelance. b) I guess several of the DM's own columnists have similar arrangements. c) They're assuming that she would be on the 50% tax rate....

Note weasel words "up to".... they don't know what she earns.

Just the DM stirring it again.

Note weasel words "guess", "assuming"... Wink

Now the Telegraph's Andrew Gilligan has a stir, with another target:


Ken Livingstone uses loophole to save £50,000 in tax
Ken Livingstone, who has attacked tax avoiders as “rich b-------” who should “not be allowed to vote”, has avoided at least £50,000 in tax by having himself paid through a personal company.
By Andrew Gilligan
7:50AM GMT 26 Feb 2012

Companies House documents show that Mr Livingstone, who is Labour’s candidate for the London mayoralty, earned £232,000 in 2009, the first year after his defeat to Boris Johnson at the last mayoral election.
The money, from personal appearances, speechmaking and hosting a radio show, was paid directly into a new company set up by Mr Livingstone and his then partner, now wife, Emma Beal, who are sole shareholders.

Accountants shown the documents by The Sunday Telegraph say the move appears designed to ensure that Mr Livingstone paid corporation tax at 20 or 21 per cent, rather than income tax at up to 40 per cent — a loophole the former mayor has himself attacked as “Robin Hood in reverse”. Mr Livingstone confirmed this arrangement last night.

He is also able to split his income 50-50 with his wife, even though it was earned entirely by him, saving further tax, and pay Mrs Livingstone from company funds as his “assistant”.

Mr Livingstone, who has called for a top tax rate of 80 per cent, has made attacking “the rich” a key part of his campaign to retake his old job at this May’s election. He has criticised tax avoiders, saying: “These rich b------- just don’t get it… No one should be allowed to vote in a British election, let alone sit in Parliament, unless they pay their full share of tax.
"Cameron’s problem is too many of his team have become super-rich by exploiting every tax fiddle… [We should] sweep away tax scams and everybody should pay tax at the same rate on earnings and other income.”
[quite!]

Mr Livingstone has criticised Mr Johnson as a “mayor for the rich” whose earnings include his pay as a Daily Telegraph columnist. “I live a normal life, I have a normal home,” Mr Livingstone said at a debate last week. To applause, he told Mr Johnson: “If you can’t live on £140,000 [the mayoral salary], you must have a very interesting lifestyle.”

Mr Livingstone’s latest accounts, for 2010, show he has almost £320,000 in cash in his company, Silveta Ltd, with earnings of £284,000 invoiced in that year alone. By leaving his earnings in his company, a shareholder can avoid large amounts of income tax.

Richard Murphy, an accountant and expert in tax avoidance, said: “Mr Livingstone chose not to pay out this profit to himself and his partner and, as such, the profits would only have been subject to corporation tax at 21 or 20 per cent in the company. Higher taxes would very likely have been paid on this income if it had been paid to the shareholders in 2009.”

Mr Livingstone said: “The company has paid [corporation] tax and when it pays me you pay an amount that is effectively the same rate as you would have done on income tax.”
Accountants say that this is incorrect. If Mr Livingstone did decide to take any money from the company, by paying himself and his wife a dividend, he would make further tax savings, they said.

Richard Mannion, national tax director at Smith & Williamson, an accountancy firm, said there was nothing illegal about what Mr Livingstone was doing.
However, he added: “Given what Mr Livingstone has said about tax avoidance, that takes you into a whole different area of what is legally correct and what is morally correct.”

etc...

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/london-mayor-election/9105977/Ken-Livingstone-uses-loophole-to-save-50000-in-tax.html

Mr Livingstone said: “The company has paid [corporation] tax and when it pays me you pay an amount that is effectively the same rate as you would have done on income tax.”

So why go to the bother of setting up a company then?
A definite whiff of the H-word here!
Twisted Evil
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PostPosted: 26-02-2012 12:32    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner2 wrote:
A definite whiff of the H-word here! Twisted Evil


Hippopotamus? Smile
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PostPosted: 28-02-2012 07:15    Post subject: Reply with quote

From individuals to corporations:

Barclays Bank told by Treasury to pay £500m avoided tax

Barclays Bank has been ordered by the Treasury to pay half-a-billion pounds in tax it tried to avoid.
Barclays was accused by HM Revenue and Customs of designing and using two schemes that were intended to avoid substantial amounts of tax.
The government has taken the unusual step of introducing retrospective legislation to end "aggressive tax avoidance" by financial institutions.
The authorities were alerted to the loopholes by Barclays itself.

Barclays has not been named officially by the government but the BBC has been told by several well placed sources that it is the target of HMRC's crackdown
The government has closed the schemes to retrieve £500m of lost tax and safeguard payments of billions of more tax in the future.

BBC business editor Robert Peston said it was highly embarrassing for Barclays because Britain's big banks have all signed a code committing them not to engage in tax avoidance.

Announcing the crackdown, Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury, David Gauke, said the bank involved should never have devised the schemes in the first place.
"The bank that disclosed these schemes to HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) has adopted the Banking Code of Practice on Taxation which contains a commitment not to engage in tax avoidance," he said.
"The government is clear that these are not transactions that a bank that has adopted the code should be undertaking.
"We do not take today's action lightly, but the potential tax loss from this scheme and the history of previous abuse in this area mean that this is a circumstance where the decision to change the law with full retrospective effect is justified."

One tax dodge involved the bank claiming it should not have to pay corporation tax on profits made when buying back its own IOUs.
The second tax avoidance scheme, designed by the same bank, involved investment funds claiming that non-taxable income entitled the funds to tax credits that could be reclaimed from HMRC.
The Treasury described this as "an attempt to secure 'repayment' from the Exchequer of tax that has not been paid".

A Treasury source suggested that outlawing the tax dodges immediately would save the government a further £2bn in tax that would otherwise have been foregone.

Barclays disclosed the two schemes to the tax authorities under rules which have been in place since 2004.
Anyone, such as a bank, accountant, lawyer or tax adviser, who devises a seemingly legal tax avoidance plan, is obliged to tell the tax authorities about it within a few days of using it or marketing it to clients.

More than 2,000 schemes have been disclosed in the past eight years.

etc...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-17181213
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PostPosted: 28-02-2012 09:04    Post subject: Reply with quote

Squeeze the rich! Poll shows public want Budget to redistribute wealth
Andrew Grice Tuesday 28 February 2012

A majority of people want George Osborne to increase taxes for the rich in next month's Budget so he can take more low-paid workers out of tax, according to a survey for The Independent. Some 60 per cent of the public support the Liberal Democrats' flagship policy and key Budget demand, while 34 per cent oppose it. The ComRes finding is a boost for Nick Clegg, who is pressing the Chancellor to speed up the plan to raise the personal tax-free allowance to £10,000 by 2015.

The amount people can earn before paying tax will already rise from £7,475 to £8,105 a year in April. Mr Osborne, who has been irritated by the Lib Dems' public negotiating over his Budget, made clear at the weekend that any tax cuts would have to be funded by spending cuts or tax rise, not borrowing.

Mr Clegg's hand will be strengthened by the ComRes poll, which suggests that taking people out of tax could be a vote-winner among older voters, many of whom could benefit. Some 45 per cent of 18-24-year-olds believe high earners should pay more tax to lift those at the bottom out of the tax net. Among those aged 65 and over, support for this policy rises to 73 per cent.

The Lib Dem plan is more popular among men (64 per cent agree) than women (55 per cent). It enjoys the backing of half of Conservative supporters (51 per cent) and is more popular among Labour voters (69 per cent) than the Lib Dems' own supporters (64 per cent).

Labour has extended its lead from one point to three points since our last ComRes survey a month ago. Labour is on 40 per cent (up two points), the Conservatives on 37 per cent (unchanged), the Liberal Democrats on 13 per cent (down one point) and other parties on 10 per cent (down one point). Labour leads the Tories by 40 to 35 per cent among women, while the parties are neck and neck among men (40 per cent).

According to ComRes, there is public support for demands by Tory MPs for Budget tax cuts aimed at business, rather than individuals, to get the economy moving. Some 58 per cent of people back this approach, while 32 per cent disagree.

There is public scepticism about Labour's call for tax cuts if that means higher than planned borrowing in the short term. By a margin of 59 to 31 per cent, people believe the Chancellor should use any spare money to reduce the government deficit rather than cut taxes. Significantly, a majority of Labour supporters (54 per cent) back this statement, suggesting that the party may be out of step with its own voters. It is also endorsed by 74 per cent of Tory supporters and 49 per cent of Lib Dem supporters. Voters back by 61 to 33 per cent Mr Osborne's plans to end child benefit to families with at least one higher rate taxpayer.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/squeeze-the-rich-poll-shows-public-want-budget-to-redistribute-wealth-7447282.html
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StormkhanOffline
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PostPosted: 28-02-2012 19:11    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, like the budget is going to "Squeeze the Rich". Rolling Eyes

Then there would be a direct tax on footballers wages - and their parasites like agents, to be fair.
Then there would be a tax on the MP's themselves, imposed on any "expenses" that they claim.
There would be a tax on any bonus benefit offered by a bank to it's prospective management. I mean, offer a bonus to a bank exec. even as a standard and not performance related but apply, say, 30% tax.

Unfortunately, Clegg is going to pull his trousers down (in private, of course) then offer it to "ThatcherClone" Cameron to spank.
Cameron sells the country off and Clegg says "Woof!"
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