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oldroverOffline
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PostPosted: 13-03-2012 22:36    Post subject: Reply with quote

They're dead.
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ramonmercadoOnline
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PostPosted: 13-03-2012 23:07    Post subject: Reply with quote

oldrover wrote:
They're dead.


it'll be a mammoth task to bring them back.
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oldroverOffline
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PostPosted: 14-03-2012 01:14    Post subject: Reply with quote

ooooooh
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titchOffline
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PostPosted: 14-03-2012 17:28    Post subject: Reply with quote

Talking about cloning mammoths is just a shaggy elephant story
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oldroverOffline
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PostPosted: 14-03-2012 18:47    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hang on I'll get your coat for you.
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KondoruOffline
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PostPosted: 14-03-2012 19:05    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh, no its shed red hairs all over the floor!
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 04-04-2012 06:09    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kondoru wrote:
Oh, no its shed red hairs all over the floor!

No! Strawberry blond!

Mammoths killed by lions taken by people, find suggests

[article]

Woolly Mammoth: Secrets from the Ice is on BBC Two at 21:00 BST on Wednesday 4 April and will be shown on the Discovery Channel in the US at a future date.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/17525070
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oldroverOffline
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PostPosted: 04-04-2012 21:08    Post subject: Reply with quote

All in all I found the article more interesting than the programme.

Well worth clicking on the Eurasian cave lions link there to see the cave drawings of them.
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ramonmercadoOnline
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PostPosted: 12-06-2012 23:14    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Mammoths didn't go out with a bang
http://www.nature.com/news/mammoths-didn-t-go-out-with-a-bang-1.10820
Study suggests Beringia’s shaggy behemoths went extinct after a slow and gradual decline.

Brian Switek
12 June 2012
Article tools

Why are there no more woolly mammoths? The last isolated island populations of these huge beasts disappeared about 4,000 years ago — well after the Pleistocene extinction that wiped out much of the world’s megafauna — but what triggered their demise remains a frustrating mystery. According to the latest study to contribute to the ongoing debate, the last mammoths disappeared after a long, slow decline in numbers rather than because of a single cause.


The various ages and locations of woolly mammoth bones reveal that they went extinct over a long period of time rather than all at once.
TOM BEAN/ALAMY
Woolly mammoths (Mammuthus primigenius) once roamed over cold, dry grasslands in the Northern Hemisphere called mammoth steppe. Their remains are especially common in Beringia, the bridge of land that connects eastern Russia and western Alaska. Now, palaeoecologist Glen MacDonald at the University of California, Los Angeles, and his colleagues have tracked the pattern of the Beringian mammoth’s extinction. Their results are published today in Nature Communications1.

MacDonald and his colleagues combined a geographical database of mammoth finds with radiocarbon dates for mammoth specimens, prehistoric plants and archaeological sites to follow how woolly mammoth ranges expanded and contracted during the past 45,000 years.

The team found that woolly mammoth populations waxed and waned as the cold climate of the Pleistocene gave way to a warmer, wetter one. Between the time of the oldest mammoths in the study and the end of the Last Glacial Maximum, around 20,000 years ago, northern populations of mammoths declined while populations in Siberia’s interior increased.

Then, following the Younger Dryas period around 11,500 years ago, woolly mammoths became concentrated in the north and some were isolated on islands before a warmer climate replaced the mammoth steppe with conifer forests, peat bogs and birch shrubland. The island mammoths were the last holdout of a gradual extinction that had already taken place on the mainland, the authors say.

No single cause
“No one event can be blamed for the extinction,” MacDonald explains. Climate change drastically altered the mammoths' habitats, causing their populations to shrink. Prehistoric humans who were moving through Beringia at the time might also have played a part by hunting the remaining mammoths. That suggestion is backed up by a previous study showing that human predators could have hastened the extinction of slow-breeding mammoths that were already weakened by environmental change2.

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Palaeontologist Ross MacPhee of the American Museum of Natural History, New York, isn’t so sure about the details of MacDonald’s pattern of mammoth decline. Some of the Russian samples analysed by the team, he points out, were dated using old techniques and need to be reinvestigated.

Nevertheless, MacPhee notes that the study fits the general picture that mammoths “died out over an appreciable period” and that the extended interaction between mammoths and humans means that “‘Blitzkrieg’-style explanations for end-Pleistocene extinction are increasingly hard to accept”. The idea that multiple factors caused the extinction is attractive, MacPhee says, but “how to bind them all together in a comprehensible narrative is no mean task”.

MacDonald agrees, saying that “the take-home message for mammoth extinction is 'it’s complicated'.” But the mammoths' slow decline could be a preview of what is to come for modern species. “The issues the mammoths faced of climate change, huge habitat change and human pressure,” MacDonald notes, “are exactly what species are facing in the twenty-first century.” The major difference, he says, “is that all these things are happening at a greatly accelerated rate compared to what the mammoths faced”.

Nature doi:10.1038/nature.2012.10820

References

MacDonald, G. M. et al. Nature Commun. 3, 893 (2012).
Article
Show context
Nogués-Bravo, D., Rodríguez, J., Hortal, J., Batra, P. & Araújo, M. B. PLoS Biology 6, e79 (2008).
ArticlePubMedChemPort
Show context
Related stories and links
From nature.com
Mini mammoth once roamed Crete
09 May 2012
Ancient migration: Coming to America
02 May 2012
Early humans linked to large-carnivore extinctions
26 April 2012
Palaeoecology: What killed the big beasts?
14 March 2012
Secrets of a mastodon graveyard
08 November 2011
Mastodon fossil throws up questions over 'rapid' extinction
20 October 2011

From elsewhere

Glen MacDonald
Ross MacPhee
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ramonmercadoOnline
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PostPosted: 14-09-2012 21:30    Post subject: Reply with quote

New hope for Mammoth cloning.

Quote:
Russian mammoth remains give glimmer of hope for cloning
http://www.newsdaily.com/stories/bre88b0y6-us-russia-mammoth/
By Nastassia AstrasheuskayaPosted 2012/09/14 at 12:11 pm EDT

MOSCOW, Sep. 14, 2012 (Reuters) — Scientists who found well preserved woolly mammoth remains in a remote part of Russia hope they might contain the necessary material to clone the long extinct beast.


A child walks near a sculpture displaying a mammoth during sunset on the outskirts of Khanty-Mansiysk, March 4, 2011. REUTERS/Tatyana Makeyeva

The Russian-led international team found the remains, including fur and bone marrow, with some cell nuclei intact, in the Ust-Yansk area of the Yakutia region on Russia's Arctic coast.

The next step will be to search for living cells among the material which was preserved in the Siberian permafrost, said the Russian scientist who led the expedition with members from the United States, Canada, South Korea, Sweden and Great Britain.

"All we need for cloning is one living cell, which means it can reproduce autonomously. Then it will be no problem for us to multiply them to tens of thousands cells," said Semyon Grigoryev, a professor at North-East Federal University (NEFU).

However, media reports that the scientists were close to making a "Jurassic Park"-style breakthrough by bringing the giant mammal back to life after thousands of years of extinction, were exaggerated.

"We are counting on our region's permafrost to have kept some cells alive. But it is unlikely," said Grigoryev, pointing out that the remains would need to have been at a stable temperature between -4 and -20 Celsius (between 28 and -4 Fahrenheit) for any cells to remain alive.

Some media had reported that living cells had been discovered, but Grigoryev said that had been due to a translation error as the word "intact" had been translated from English into Russian as "living".

"What we have found are intact cells, with a whole nucleus," he said, adding that living cells, if found, would provide the necessary samples to make a living clone.

The Yana 2012 expedition found the remains last week at the depth of 5-6 meters (16-20 feet) in a tunnel dug by locals searching for rare and valuable mammoth bone.

A previous find, discovered in the same region two years ago, yielded the remains of a 40,000-year-old female baby woolly mammoth, named Yuka by scientists, as well as those of an ancient bison and horse. Those finds lacked living cells.

To determine whether the cells are living, they will be examined by a South Korean scientist, Hwang Woo Suk, whose Sooam Biotech has done several animal clonings, including the world's first commercial dog cloning.

Scientists have made several attempts to revive mammoths using cells of remains since 1990s, none of them successful.

(Editing by Robin Pomeroy)
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ramonmercadoOnline
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PostPosted: 07-10-2012 01:11    Post subject: Reply with quote

This may be the same mammoth as described in the previous post but gives the info that it was discovered by an 11 year old boy. I bet he had his dog with him.

Quote:
Mammoth carcass found in Siberia
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19848109

The carcass, discovered on Russia's Taimyr Peninsula, still has one of its tusks

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A well-preserved mammoth carcass has been found by an 11-year-old boy in the permafrost of northern Siberia.

The remains were discovered at the end of August in Sopochnaya Karga, 3,500km (2,200 miles) northeast of Moscow.

A team of experts from St Petersburg then spent five days in September extracting the body from frozen mud.

The mammoth is estimated to have been around 16 years old when it died; it stood 2m tall and weighed 500kg.

It has been named Zhenya, after Zhenya Salinder, the 11-year-old who found the carcass while walking his dogs in the area.

Alexei Tikhonov, from the St Petersburg Zoology Institute, who led the team excavating the mammoth, said this specimen could either have been killed by Ice Age humans, or by a rival mammoth.

He added that it was well preserved for an adult specimen.

His colleague Sergei Gorbunov, from the International Mammoth Committee, which works to recover and safeguard such remains, said: "We had to use both traditional instruments such as axes, picks, shovels as well as such devices as this "steamer" which allowed us to thaw a thin layer of permafrost.

"Then we cleaned it off, and then we melted more of it. It took us a week to complete this task."

But several juvenile examples have come to light that are more complete.

Earlier this year, a very well preserved juvenile mammoth nicknamed Yuka was unveiled by scientists.

Found in the Yakutia region of Russia, it preserves much of its soft tissue and strawberry-blonde coat of hair. There were also signs from its remains that humans may have stolen the carcass from lions and perhaps even stashed it for eating at a later date.
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kamalktkOffline
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PostPosted: 07-10-2012 12:12    Post subject: Reply with quote

ramonmercado wrote:
This may be the same mammoth as described in the previous post but gives the info that it was discovered by an 11 year old boy. I bet he had his dog with him.

The article you quote says "the 11-year-old who found the carcass while walking his dogs in the area. " Wink
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KondoruOffline
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PostPosted: 07-10-2012 17:21    Post subject: Reply with quote

Its a bit small isnt it?
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ramonmercadoOnline
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PostPosted: 07-10-2012 22:48    Post subject: Reply with quote

kamalktk wrote:
ramonmercado wrote:
This may be the same mammoth as described in the previous post but gives the info that it was discovered by an 11 year old boy. I bet he had his dog with him.

The article you quote says "the 11-year-old who found the carcass while walking his dogs in the area. " Wink


How did I miss that sentence? You added it in! You're a secret mod!
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Zilch5Offline
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PostPosted: 09-11-2012 01:14    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
“Impeccably preserved” woolly mammoth excavated in France

The nearly complete skeleton was found with neanderthal-made spearheads among bones

Archaeologists near Paris Thursday excavated a nearly complete woolly mammoth skeleton. The long-dead mammoth, named “Helmut,” is considered remarkable not simply because it is “impeccably preserved” but also because neanderthal-made spearheads were discovered among the bones.

As Salon noted in October following the accidental discovery by a Russian boy of a mammoth carcass, “such discoveries fuel ongoing interest in cloning a mammoth.” Scientists in South Korea, Russia and Japan are already working on mammoth cloning projects using stem cells.

The video below gives more details on this latest French discovery:


Source: http://www.salon.com/2012/11/08/impeccably_preserved_woolly_mammoth_excavated_in_france/
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