Forums

 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages 
Iron Age Discoveries & Heritage.
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Fortean Times Message Board Forum Index -> Earth Mysteries - historical and classical cases
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 20669
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 05-12-2012 13:25    Post subject: Reply with quote

Vid at link.

Quote:
Iron Age bronze helmet found on Canterbury farmland
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-kent-20594096

More or less intact helmets of the era are very rare finds, said University of Kent archaeologist Dr Steven Willis

A rare Iron Age helmet unearthed by a metal detector enthusiast on farmland near Canterbury has been described as a significant find by the British Museum.

The bronze helmet was found with bone fragments, and had been used to hold human remains after a cremation, Canterbury Archaeological Trust said.

The finder contacted archaeologists because he was confident he had made a significant discovery, the trust said.

University of Kent experts have found it dates back to the 1st Century BC.

Andrew Richardson, finds manager at the trust, said the person who found the helmet wanted to remain anonymous.

Registered as treasure
A brooch that would have fastened a bag holding the cremated bone was also unearthed, he said.

Julia Farley, Iron Age curator at the British Museum, said it was one of a handful of Iron Age helmets found in Britain.

Continue reading the main story

Start Quote

The secrets of this helmet are only just beginning to emerge”

Dr Steven Willis
University of Kent
She said it was not unusual to bury cremated remains in a bag fastened with a brooch in late Iron Age Kent.

But she said: "No other cremation has ever been found accompanied by a helmet."

She added: "The owner of this helmet, or the people who placed it in the grave, may have lived through the very beginning of the story of Roman Britain."

Dr Steven Willis, senior lecturer in archaeology at the University of Kent, said laser-scanning technology had been used to analyse the helmet and establish details of its manufacture, decoration and use.

He said: "The secrets of this helmet are only just beginning to emerge but we will know much more as the work progresses."

Dr Willis also said more or less intact helmets of the era were very rare finds.

He said one was known of in Belgium that had also been used as a cremation container.

The objects have been registered as treasure, reported to the coroner, and will remain at the British Museum, the university said.

But academics said it was hoped Canterbury Museum would be able to acquire the finds so they could be permanently displayed in Kent.


Experts from the British Museum, Canterbury Archaeological Trust and the University of Kent talk about the importance of the find
Back to top
View user's profile 
Zilch5Offline
Vogon Poet
Joined: 08 Nov 2007
Total posts: 1580
Location: Western Sydney, Australia
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 17-01-2013 21:10    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Storms Reveal Iron Age Skeleton

A series of storms that hit Scotland's Shetland Islands over the holidays revealed what archaeologists believe could be 2,000-year-old human remains.

Police were initially called to the scene when storms eroded a cliff at Channerwick and exposed the skeleton, but officials soon determined that they wouldn't have to open a homicide investigation.

Local archaeologist Chris Dyer said the ancient skeleton looked as if it were contemporary with the remains of Iron Age structures revealed nearby. Researchers then identified evidence of one or possibly two more burials at the site, but another storm caused a further chunk of the cliff to crumble, covering up the discovery.

"The original burial now lies under several tons of fallen bank, and the Iron Age structures have also disappeared from view," Dyer said in a statement from the Shetland Amenity Trust.

Regarding the new finding, officials have not planned further archaeological work at the site, but said a small piece of bone was recovered and will be analyzed using radiocarbon dating to confirm the skeleton's age.


http://www.livescience.com/26311-storms-reveal-iron-age-skeleton.html
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25272
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 08-07-2013 07:38    Post subject: Reply with quote

Volunteer army drafted to map every ancient hill fort
By Judith Burns, BBC News education reporter

Archaeologists are drafting a volunteer army to help map every ancient hill fort across Britain and Ireland.
It is part of a project to create an online atlas of around 5,000 of these Iron Age monuments.
Prehistory enthusiasts are being asked to identify and record features such as ramparts, ditches and entrances.
Prof Ian Lock, of Oxford University, said: "We want to shed new light on why they were created and how they were used."

Despite their large numbers there has been little academic work on hill forts, how they were used and how they varied across Britain and Ireland, the researchers say.

Prof Lock, who has studied and excavated a number of the forts in England, said that despite their name archaeological evidence suggests they were not primarily used for military purposes.
"We have found pottery, metalwork and evidence of domestic activities like spinning and weaving, also of agriculture, crops like wheat and barley and of keeping pigs, sheep and cattle," he told BBC News.
Researchers believe they may have been meeting places for religious festivals or market days.

The oldest hill forts are in Ireland and Wales and are up to 3,000 years old. Many were abandoned after the Romans arrived in Britain, but in areas that the Romans did not occupy they were used for longer.

The research team want information not only on well-preserved forts but also on sites where only crop marks indicate their existence. The idea is to build a free online database.
"We are hoping that local archaeology societies will get involved," said Prof Lock.
"Rather than going to a hill fort on your own, it would be better, with a group of people, to talk about what you are looking at, which should make it easier to identify the various details," he said.

Dr Jon Murden, director of the Dorset museum in Dorchester, which is owned and run by the county's natural history and archaeological society, told BBC News: "We would love to be involved.
"There are at least 50 hill forts to explore and understand on the South Dorset Ridgeway alone."

Volunteers will be able to feed information on their local hill fort into an online form on the Atlas of Hillforts project website from Monday.
"We are keen to see what the citizen science approach may reveal," said Prof Ian Ralston, of Edinburgh University, the project co-director.

"We hope that the public, including archaeological societies, will get behind this project as it should lead to the discovery of new sites and new information about sites that are considered to be well known. We expect the results of this project to change our vision of these iconic monuments."

The four-year project is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. The maps will be freely available to the public, searchable by region and linked to Google Earth to show the hillforts in the context of the landscape.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-23203500
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 20669
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 09-07-2013 11:43    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent initiative.
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25272
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 17-08-2013 12:46    Post subject: Reply with quote

17 August 2013 Last updated at 12:10

Ipplepen Iron Age settlement 'one of most significant' finds

An Iron Age settlement unearthed in Devon has been described as one of the most important finds of its kind.
It was prompted by the chance discovery of Roman coins in fields at Ipplepen, near Newton Abbot about four years ago.
Archaeologists, who have recently started examining the site, said it is the first of its kind in the county.

The excavation is being funded by the British Museum, Exeter University, the Portable Antiquities Scheme (PAS) and Devon County Council.
Sam Moorhead from the British Museum said he believed the Ipplepen site was "one of the most significant Roman discoveries in the country for many decades".

The site was discovered by local metal detector enthusiasts Jim Wills and Dennis Hewings, who contacted archaeologist Danielle Wootton, the Devon finds liaison officer for the PAS.
Ms Wootton said local people had been involved in the project, with about 40 volunteers helping at the excavation site.
"When we announced the find at a community meeting about three years ago, the hall was absolutely packed with local people and there was an electric atmosphere," she told BBC News.
"The bit we've excavated at the moment is prehistoric - it's Iron Age - but we have picked up traces of some Roman Romano-British field boundaries," she said.

"It's probably going to take us a very long time for us to fully understand the nature of the settlement and how long it was occupied for.
Ms Wootton said the important discovery should be credited to Mr Wills and Mr Hewings who had painstakingly recorded "every scrap of metal" they found.
"Jim and Dennis have been absolutely first class in recording what they've found and it's a result of them being responsible with their metal detecting that we've discovered this site," she said.

Mr Wills said the oldest coin he found dated back to 117BC,
"The very first Roman coin I found strangely enough - and this is out of more than 100 coins we found subsequently - is still the oldest of all the coins," he said.
"I've been detecting for many years, but it's always thrilling to dig up something you recognise is really important."

Part of the settlement excavation site will be open to the public on Sunday.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-23733741
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 20669
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 20-08-2013 12:06    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Iron Age fortifications from 8th century B.C. unearthed in Israel

A 3D rendering of the fortification found on the Israeli coast. Credit: Philip Sapirstein/American Friends of Tel Aviv University
y
Published: Aug. 19, 2013 at 5:24 PM


TEL AVIV, Israel, Aug. 19 (UPI) -- Archaeologists say they've discovered the remains of massive ancient fortifications protecting an Iron Age Assyrian harbor in present-day Israel.

Unearthed in an archaeological dig in the contemporary Israeli coastal city of Ashdod, the heart of the well-preserved fortifications is a mud-brick wall more than 12 feet thick and 15 feet high, researchers from Tel Aviv University reported.

Stretching for hundreds of feet, the fortifications would have formed a daunting crescent-shaped defense for an inland area covering more than 17 acres, they said.

"The fortifications appear to protect an artificial harbor," archaeologist Alexander Fantalkin said. "If so, this would be a discovery of international significance, the first known harbor of this kind in our corner of the Levant."

When the fortifications were built in the 8th century B.C., the Assyrians ruled the southeastern part of the Mediterranean basin, including parts of Africa and the Middle East.

The fortifications may have been built during a local rebellion against Sargon II, the king of the Assyrian Empire, which was brutally put down by the Assyrians, researchers said.

"An amazing amount of time and energy was invested in building the wall and glacis [embankments]," Fantalkin said.



Read more: http://www.upi.com/Science_News/2013/08/19/Iron-Age-fortifications-from-8th-century-BC-unearthed-in-Israel/UPI-91251376947450/#ixzz2cVgyXqhb
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 20669
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 29-08-2013 12:12    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mixed bag, Neolithic artefacts as well.

Quote:
Ancient artefacts found in melting snow
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-23849332
By Melissa Hogenboom
Science reporter, BBC News

The well-worn tunic was incredibly well preserved and was made from wool

An Iron Age tunic is amongst the discoveries found under melting snow on Norwegian mountains.

Other findings include Neolithic arrows and bow fragments, thought to be about 6000 years old.

Snow on the Norwegian mountains, and elsewhere, is rapidly melting due to climate change, which is now unveiling a world of well preserved new discoveries.

The findings are published in two papers in the journal Antiquity.

"The new find is of great significance for dress and textile production and how these reflect the interplay between northern Europe and the Roman world," said Marianne Vedeler from the University of Oslo, Norway, who analysed the garment.

Continue reading the main story

Start Quote

As the climate continues to heat up and the snows melt away, one wonders what long-term price there will be to pay for these glimpses of the frozen past”

Martin Callanan
The tunic, found on the Norwegian Lendbreen glacier, was partly bleached from sun and wind exposure. It showed hard wear and tear and had been repaired with two patches.

It was made between 230 and 390 AD and is one of only a handful of tunics that exists from this period. Two different fabrics were present and the fibre tips revealed that both were made of lamb's wool or wool from adult sheep.

"The Lendbreen tunic is a first glimpse of the kind of warm clothing used by hunters frequenting the ice patches of Scandinavia in pursuit of reindeer. It had no buttons or fastenings, but was simply drawn over the head like a sweater," said Dr Vedeler.

Snow patches
Snow patches are rapidly melting due to a changing climate
"The patching shows that this was not the first stage of the tunic's life; indeed, the hunter who abandoned it may not have been its first owner."

The arrows and bow fragments were much older and also found in snow patches - natural areas of snow which grow when it snows and melt in the sun.

Martin Callanan of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, who authored the arrows and bow fragments paper, said: "When people lost their arrows they lost them in the snow patches."

"These are unique finds, they are a signal that something is changing up there. As snow patches are starting to melt, people are finding archaeological artefacts in all sorts of different places and they are often quite well preserved," added Mr Callanan.

The Neolithic arrows were shorter than earlier Mesolithic shafts found in Europe, possibly due to the heavy weight of the points which were made out of slate.

The artefacts were extremely well preserved for their age and fragility, but as the changing weather increases the speed at which the snow melts, other artefacts may degenerate before they are found.

"The number and antiquity of some of these artefacts is unprecedented in the almost century-long history of snow patch surveying in the region," said Mr Callanan.

"At the same time, as the climate continues to heat up and the snows melt away, one wonders what long-term price there will be to pay for these glimpses of the frozen past."

Arrow heads
Arrow heads were thought to be lost by Neolithic hunters
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 20669
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 13-10-2013 13:02    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Iron Age camp unearthed at Potgate Quarry, Ripon
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-york-north-yorkshire-24506936

Roman pottery discovered at Potgate Quarry

Pottery discovered suggests the site was in use until the early Roman period

5/5

Archaeologists have unearthed an Iron Age enclosure while excavating land at the edge of a working quarry.

It is thought the encampment discovered at Potgate Quarry, near Ripon, was home to several families from as early as 130BC before being abandoned.

Dig leader Steve Timms said the site was later brought back into use in the early Roman period as a paddock.

Artefacts including a stone bead, quern stones used for milling and Roman pottery have been discovered.

Mr Timms said: "Within the next 12 to 18 months it will end up being quarried away so in some ways it's a bit of a rescue excavation.

"These sort of sites are quite common in Yorkshire but few have been excavated near Ripon; the Iron Age is not well understood in this area.

"It's been a really good dig because we have found something interesting and we have been able to work with local community."

The excavation was carried out at the request Lightwater Quarries, which owns the site.

An open day is taking place at the quarry between 10:00 and 16:00 BST.
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25272
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 19-03-2014 07:42    Post subject: Reply with quote

Iron Age woman's footless body found near West Knoyle

A skeleton of an Iron Age woman with her feet chopped off has been discovered in a field in Wiltshire.
The remains were found along the A303, near West Knoyle, by archaeologists ahead of a new water main being laid.
Wessex Water said the woman's feet were found "reburied alongside her" along with the carcasses of at least two sheep or goats "on her head".
Peter Cox, from AC Archaeology, said: "We're unsure why - but it must have some link to beliefs at the time."

The female skeleton was found alongside the remains of a child aged about 10 and two males with sword wounds to their hips.

Wessex Water is currently building a 40-mile (64km) pipeline to carry water from a Dorset treatment plant into Wiltshire.
It was during a pre-work survey of the West Knoyle area that AC Archaeology unearthed the Iron Age burial site.
"Human remains from these periods are very rare and indicate the long period of settlement that has occurred in the area," said Mr Cox.
"But we're unsure why the female skeleton has been found without her feet or why she may have been buried with sheep, but perhaps it was to protect her soul from bad spirits."

The bones have been removed from the site and will undergo radiocarbon dating to determine their age.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-gloucestershire-26636144
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 20669
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 30-04-2014 00:52    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Iron Age human remains uncovered in the Cotswolds

The remains are thought to date from the Iron Age
l
Human remains dating from the Iron Age have been found during archaeological excavations in Gloucestershire.

The skeleton was found at nature reserve on the outskirts of Bourton-on-the-Water near Salmonsbury Camp, an ancient hill fort.

The work also revealed what is thought to be a roundhouse and a series of pits that may have been used to store grain.

Tom Beasley-Suffolk, Cotswolds reserves manager, said the remains will be cleaned and then analysed.

"It has been fascinating to see what were slightly dark areas of ground being excavated to reveal pot and human remains that probably last saw the light of day 2,500 years ago," he added.
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-gloucestershire-27210411
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 20669
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 23-05-2014 00:37    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Iron Age settlement unearthed at Swindon building site

Archaeological digging at Ridgeway Farm near Swindon

Further digging at Ridgeway Farm is expected to continue for up to three weeks

A small Iron Age settlement has been found during excavations at the site of a new housing development near Swindon.

A number of "round houses" with hundreds of pits for storage are among the discoveries at Ridgeway Farm, where Taylor Wimpey is building 700 homes.

Other items found include loom weights for weaving, quern stones for grinding corn and various personal items.

Andrew Manning from Wessex Archaeology, which is carrying out the work, said the find was of local significance.

Archaeological digging at Ridgeway Farm near Swindon
Wessex Archaeology said the discovery was of local significance
He added that some evidence of Roman life, notably a large clay quarry pit, had been unearthed as well.

The archaeological digging is expected to continue for a further three weeks.

A Taylor Wimpey spokesman said: "We scheduled the archaeological investigation into our programme of work, as it is a vital step of the process.

"The work will continue until our contractors are completely satisfied that they have thoroughly investigated and recovered everything which they need for further analysis."
Quote:

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-wiltshire-27515176
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 20669
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 28-05-2014 12:47    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm going to have some implants soon, I'm sure things have improved.

Quote:
Grave find may be Western Europe's earliest false tooth

The iron pin may once have held a false tooth, but it's impossible to know for sure

Archaeologists have identified what could be remains of the earliest false tooth found in Western Europe.

The dental implant comes from the richly-furnished timber burial chamber of an Iron Age woman that was excavated in Le Chene, northern France.

The woman, who was between 20 and 30 years old when she died, had an iron pin in place of an upper incisor tooth.

It is possible the pin once held a false tooth made from either wood or bone, which could have rotted away.

"The best hypothesis is that it was a dental prosthesis - or at least, an attempt at one”

Guillaume Seguin
Archeosphere
The findings have been published in the scholarly journal Antiquity.

The grave was one of four adult female burials in an enclosure dating to the third century BC that were discovered during the construction of a housing development in the Champagne-Ardenne region.

The burials, which contained a rich array of grave goods, show all the hallmarks of the Celtic La Tene culture, which flourished across Central and Western Europe at the time.

"The skeleton was very badly preserved," Guillaume Seguin, who excavated the young woman's skeleton in 2009, told BBC News.

"But the teeth were in an anatomical position, with the molars, pre-molars, canines and incisors. Then there was this piece of metal. My first reaction was: what is this?"

The teeth were bagged and taken away for analysis. Mr Seguin later realised that the woman had 31 rather than 32 teeth, and photos taken at the excavation site show the iron pin in the place where the missing tooth would have been.

"The fact that it has the same dimensions and shape as the teeth means that the best hypothesis is that it was a dental prosthesis - or at least, an attempt at one," said Mr Seguin, from the Bordeaux-based archaeology firm Archeosphere.

There are reasons to doubt whether it was successful, says Mr Seguin. Firstly, the propensity for iron to corrode inside the body makes it unsuitable for use as a dental implant; titanium is the material of choice today for modern versions.

Secondly, the absence of sterile conditions during this period mean the pin could have caused an abscess, followed by an infection that could potentially have ended the individual's life.

However, the poor preservation of the remains means it is impossible to say whether the implant played any role in the woman's death.

While the find may be the earliest dental implant known from Western Europe, prosthetic teeth dating back 5,500 years have been found in Egypt and the Near East.

However, most are believed to have been inserted after death to restore the appearance of the deceased.

The researchers cannot completely rule out a post-mortem insertion of the pin in this case either. But they argue that several converging lines of evidence point to its use during life as an implant.

But it remains impossible to say for certain whether the pin once held a replacement tooth made of bone or wood, both of which could have perished in the acidic soil.

In Antiquity, Mr Seguin, along with co-authors from the University of Bordeaux, wrote that the burials "convey the image of a social elite concerned about their appearance".

They also note that the date of the burials coincides with a period when the Celtic Gauls were in contact with the Etruscan civilisation of northern Italy.

The Etruscans were known for their relative mastery of dentistry, although the partial dentures inserted into gold bands and fitted onto existing teeth represent a different approach to dental restoration than that seen in third century Gaul.

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-27587104
Back to top
View user's profile 
MythopoeikaOffline
I am a meat popsicle
Joined: 18 Sep 2001
Total posts: 10460
Location: Not far from Bedford
Gender: Unknown
PostPosted: 28-05-2014 19:01    Post subject: Reply with quote

ramonmercado wrote:
I'm going to have some implants soon, I'm sure things have improved.


Really? Make sure to get the right bra size.






Wink
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25272
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 28-05-2014 19:54    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mythopoeika wrote:
ramonmercado wrote:
I'm going to have some implants soon, I'm sure things have improved.

Really? Make sure to get the right bra size.

Ramon stuffs the cups with cotton wool, and wears the bra on his head to keep his ears warm in cold weather... Wink
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 20669
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 28-05-2014 21:23    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner2 wrote:
Mythopoeika wrote:
ramonmercado wrote:
I'm going to have some implants soon, I'm sure things have improved.

Really? Make sure to get the right bra size.

Ramon stuffs the cups with cotton wool, and wears the bra on his head to keep his ears warm in cold weather... Wink


I'll sink my new teeth into both of you. Twisted Evil
Back to top
View user's profile 
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Fortean Times Message Board Forum Index -> Earth Mysteries - historical and classical cases All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Page 2 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group