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Boko Haram Islamist Cult
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 19-08-2013 22:31    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Abubakar Shekau of Nigeria's Boko Haram 'may be dead'
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-23761048

Abubakar Shekau, leader of Boko Haram

Nigeria's militant Islamist leader Abubakar Shekau may have been killed by the security forces during a shoot-out, an army spokesman has said.

An "intelligence report" showed that Shekau, the leader of the Boko Haram group, may have died between 25 July and 3 August, Lt-Col Sagir Musa said.

Boko Haram, which has waged an insurgency in Nigeria since 2009, has not commented on the statement.

The US had put a bounty of $7m (£4.6m) on Shekau's head.

'Imposter'
The intelligence report suggested that Shekau was shot on 30 June, when soldiers raided a Boko Haram base at Sambisa Forest in north-eastern Nigeria.

"Shekau was mortally wounded in the encounter and was sneaked into Amitchide - a border community in Cameroon for treatment... It is greatly believed that Shekau might have died between 25 July to 3 August 2013," Col Musa said.

A video of Shekau, released on 13 August, was "dramatised by an imposter to hoodwink the sect members to continue with the terrorism", he added.

On 14 August, the military said it had killed Boko Haram's second-in-command, Momodu Bama, also known by his alias "Abu Saad".

Correspondents say there is no independent confirmation of Shekau's or Bama's death.

Thousands of people have died since Boko Haram began its insurgency in 2009.

A claim in 2009 that Shekau had been killed turned out to be untrue, they add.

He became leader of Boko Haram after its founder, Muhammad Yusuf, died in police custody in the same year.

The insurgency became far more brutal under Shekau's leadership, with Boko Haram carrying out a wave of bombings and abductions, including that of foreigners, in its campaign to create an Islamic state across Nigeria, correspondents say.

In May, President Goodluck Jonathan declared an emergency in three north-eastern states, saying the group threatened Nigeria's existence.
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PostPosted: 24-08-2013 13:13    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Nigerian Islamists accused of cutting throats of 44 villagers
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/aug/24/nigerian-islamists-cut-throats

Official says attackers gouged out eyes of some survivors of raid on Dumba village

theguardian.com, Saturday 24 August 2013 10.56 BST

Islamist extremists have been accused of cutting the throats of 44 villagers in continuing attacks in an Islamic uprising in north-east Nigeria.

An official from the National Emergency Management Agency said on Saturday the attackers hit Dumba village in Borno state before dawn on Tuesday. He said the method of killing was to avoid gunfire which could attract security forces.

He said the attackers gouged out the eyes of some of the survivors.

Dumba is near the fishing village of Baga, where security forces gunned down 187 civilians in March in retaliation for an attack by extremists.

It is difficult to get information from the area, which is under a state of emergency with mobile phone and internet services cut.

Borno is one of three north-eastern states under a state of emergency declared on 14 May to crack down on the Boko Haram terrorist network.

Since 2010 more than 1,700 people have been killed in attacks by Islamist insurgents, according to an Associated Press count.
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PostPosted: 21-09-2013 13:43    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now they strike in the capital. This will result in an inevitable crackdown where the military may well target anyone suspected of BH involvement.

Quote:
Nigeria's 'Boko Haram': Abuja sees security forces targeted
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-24178048

Nigeria's north-east has witnessed a massive military deployment since May

A cell of suspected Islamist militants has opened fire on security forces in Nigeria's capital Abuja, say officials.

The clash occurred at about 03:00 local time after a tip-off about the location of a suspected Boko Haram weapons cache, Nigeria's spy agency said.

The State Security Service did not give any details about casualties. A witness told the BBC he saw nine bodies.

However, other witnesses told Reuters news agency the shooting came during an attempt to move squatters.

Six witnesses told Reuters the house was owned by a military man who wanted them to leave his property.

The BBC's Mohammed Kabir Mohammed in Abuja says the shooting took place at a two-storey building which has just been built but is not yet complete.

Young men have been using the building to sleep in at night, he says.

Boko Haram is most active in north-eastern Nigeria, where a state of emergency was imposed in May.

If confirmed, it would be the first time Boko Haram has staged an attack in Abuja this year.

Attacks in the north-east have increased recently despite a massive military deployment to the worst-affected areas.

In the latest incident in Borno state, officials said at least 87 people had been killed by militants, who disguised themselves in military uniforms at a checkpoint outside the town of Benisheik. They shot dead those trying to flee.

The group wants to create an Islamic state across Nigeria and has waged a deadly insurgency since 2009.

'Digging for arms'
The security team which approached the building were acting on information received from two men, agents said.

"No sooner had the team commenced digging for the arms, than they came under heavy gunfire attack by other Boko Haram elements," Reuters news agency quotes a statement from State Security Service as saying.

Our reporter says the building is in Abuja's Apo district, home to a huge residential complex for Nigerian parliamentarians.

Abuja suffered two major Boko Haram attacks two years ago, when a suicide bomber rammed a car into the police headquarters, killing eight people in June 2011.

About two months after that, the group attacked the UN headquarters in Abuja, killing 23 people.

The attack near Benisheik took place on Tuesday, but news of it was slow to emerge as all phone lines have been cut off in an effort to help the military offensive.

The Boko Haram members drove into the town in about 20 pick-up trucks, the AFP news agency quoted an anonymous security source as saying.

The BBC's Nigeria correspondent Will Ross says it was one of the deadliest since the state of emergency was declared.

In the three days since the attack, health workers have been loading dead bodies onto trucks and some reports say the militants killed more than 140 people.

"Apart from the dead bodies recovered today [Thursday], we collected 55 on Wednesday and the fact is that we did not go deep into the bush where I strongly believe that many people have fallen there," Nigeria's Daily Trust newspaper quotes Abdulaziz Kolomi, an official with state's environmental protection agency, as saying.

There was also an attack by suspected militants on Wednesday night in neighbouring Yobe state, which is also under a state of emergency but has not witnessed so much violence.

A resident of Buni Yadi told the BBC Hausa Service that Islamists attacked the town at about 22:30, burning the police station and other public buildings.

"A soldier was killed in a shootout and the wife of the [divisional police chief] was burnt to death in her home," state police commissioner Sanusi Rufa'i told AFP.

Local vigilante groups have been formed to help counter the militants but scores of these volunteers have been killed in recent weeks.

Last month, the army said it had killed Boko Haram's leader Abubakar Shekau but this has not been confirmed and the militants' attacks have continued.
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PostPosted: 27-09-2013 12:09    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Abubakar Shekau: Boko Haram chief 'shown alive' in video
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-24274818

A grab taken from a video on 13 July 2013 shows the leader of the Islamist extremist group Boko Haram Abubakar Shekau dressed in camouflage and holding a Kalashnikov AK-47 rifle

Shekau in a previous video, released in July

A video has been released in Nigeria purportedly showing the leader of the Islamist militant group Boko Haram alive.

In August, the Nigerian military said it might have killed Abubakar Shekau during a shoot-out.

In the video a man believed to be Mr Shekau said the world "should know that he could not die except by the will of Allah".

Other previous reports of his death later proved to be unfounded.

Boko Haram, which is fighting to create an Islamic state across Nigeria, has been blamed for many violent attacks which have killed nearly 2,000 people since 2011.

In the video, the man alleged to be Mr Shekau sits in a jungle environment surrounded by dozens of lieutenants dressed in fatigues.

He makes reference to recent events, such as an attack in Benisheik, Borno state, on 17 September in which at least 142 people are reported to have been killed.

BBC Hausa's Aliyu Tanko says the man's voice sounds like that of Shekau, and the video emerged from a source previously used by the Boko Haram leader.

Scepticism
On 19 August, the Nigerian military said intelligence suggested it might have killed Mr Shekau between 25 July and 3 August.

It claimed a video apparently showing Mr Shekau and circulated to journalists on 12 August was acted by an impostor.

But hundreds of people wrote in to the BBC's Hausa social media pages to express their scepticism at the announcement, which coincided with the Nigerian authorities' launch of a new brigade with special responsibility to tackle Boko Haram.

There was no independent confirmation of the army's claims.
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PostPosted: 29-09-2013 12:44    Post subject: Reply with quote

Really sickening, I know theres so much of this going on but it upset me when I heard about it on the radio. Shooting students in their beds.

Quote:
Nigeria attack: Students shot dead as they slept
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-24322683

Militants regularly target schools in Yobe, such as this one in Mamudo

Suspected Islamist gunmen have attacked a college in north-eastern Nigeria, killing up to 50 students.

They were shot dead as they slept in their dormitory at the College of Agriculture in Yobe state.

North-eastern Nigeria is under a state of emergency amid an Islamist insurgency by the Boko Haram group.

Boko Haram is fighting to overthrow Nigeria's government to create an Islamic state, and has launched a number of attacks on schools.

Classrooms burned
Casualty figures from the latest attack vary, but a local politician told the BBC that around 50 students had been killed.

The politician said two vanloads of bodies had been taken to a hospital in Yobe's state capital, Damaturu.

One hospital source told Reuters news agency that 26 bodies had been brought there.

College provost Molima Idi Mato, speaking to Associated Press, also said the number of dead could be as high as 50, adding that security forces were still recovering the bodies and that about 1,000 students had fled the campus.

A military spokesman in Yobe state, Lazarus Eli, told Agence France-Presse the gunmen had also set fire to classrooms.

The college is in the rural Gujba district.

In May, President Goodluck Jonathan ordered an operation against Boko Haram, and a state of emergency was declared for the north-east on 14 May.

Many of the Islamist militants left their bases in the north-east and violence initially fell, but revenge attacks quickly followed.

In June, Boko Haram carried out two attacks on schools in the region.

At least nine children were killed in a school on the outskirts of Maiduguri, while 13 students and teachers were killed in a school in Damaturu.

In July in the village of Mamudo in Yobe state, Islamist militants attacked a school's dormitories with guns and explosives, killing at least 42 people, mostly students.

Boko Haram regards schools as a symbol of Western culture. The group's name translates as "Western education is forbidden".
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PostPosted: 15-10-2013 11:58    Post subject: Reply with quote

The war is getting very dirty on the State side as well.

Quote:
Hundreds dead in Nigeria detention, Amnesty says
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-24528660

A screengrab taken in September and distributed to local reporters showing a man claiming to be the leader of Boko Haram, Abubakar Shekau

Most of the dead are thought to be connected to the militant group Boko Haram

Hundreds of people have died in detention facilities in north-east Nigeria as the army tries to crush an Islamist militant rebellion there, according to Amnesty International.

The human rights group said some detainees died from suffocation in overcrowded cells, others from starvation and extra-judicial killings.

In Wednesday's report, it calls for an urgent investigation into the deaths.

There has not yet been an official response to the report.

But the Nigerian army has rejected all previous accusations of human rights abuses.

A senior Nigerian army officer told Amnesty that at least 950 people had died in military custody during the first half of this year, according to an advance copy of the report seen by the BBC.

Most had been accused of having links to the Islamist militant group Boko Haram, Amnesty said.

Boko Haram is fighting to overthrow Nigeria's government to create an Islamic state, and has launched a number of attacks on schools.

About 50 students were shot dead earlier this month in their hostel, in an attack blamed on Boko Haram.

A state of emergency was declared in three northern states in May - Yobe, Borno and Adamawa - in response to thousands of deaths in militant attacks.

Children walking outside a charred house in the remote northeast town of Baga, Nigeria. (21 April 2013)
Many schools have been attacked by suspected Boko Haram militants
But while most of the recent news from has been about these civilian killings, BBC Nigeria correspondent Will Ross says this latest Amnesty report shines a light on another grim side of life in northern Nigeria.

At times, the number of people killed in these detention centres was so high that there were regular mass burials, Amnesty said.

The BBC has seen photos of bodies reportedly dumped outside the mortuary in the city of Maiduguri by the military.

The bodies showed no obvious signs of having been killed in combat.

Amnesty has called for an urgent investigation, but those who follow events closely in Nigeria will know that such an investigation is highly unlikely to happen, our correspondent says.
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PostPosted: 21-10-2013 12:31    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
'Boko Haram' gunmen kill 19 motorists in Nigeria
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-24604586

The BBC's Nigeria correspondent Tomi Oladipo reports

Militants wearing army uniforms have killed 19 people at checkpoints on a road in Nigeria's Borno state.

The armed men reportedly stopped motorists on the road and ordered them out of their cars before shooting them or hacking them to death.

Witnesses told the BBC the men were from Boko Haram, though the Islamist militant group has not yet commented.

North-eastern Nigeria is under a state of emergency as Boko Haram attempts to create an Islamist state there.

The group targets both the military and civilians, including in schools, and frequently clashes with the Nigerian armed forces.

The latest attack happened early on Sunday morning near the town of Logumani, not far from the Cameroon border.

'On the prowl'
Survivors said the gunmen were dressed as soldiers and were riding motorcycles before they ambushed their victims.

"We were asked to get out of our vehicles and lie face down by nine men dressed as soldiers who blocked the road," one man, who gave his name as Buba, told the AFP news agency.

"They shot dead five people and went about slaughtering 14 others before someone called them on the phone that soldiers were heading their way," he said.

He said the attackers then fled into the bush on their motorcycles.

Another survivor, Adamu Mallam, said he had heard the man next to him being killed with a knife.

Buba said he knew the attackers were from Boko Haram because they had beards, which soldiers do not.

"Everyone in this area knows Boko Haram is on the prowl, raiding villages and attacking vehicles. It has become a common occurrence," he said.

The BBC's Nigeria correspondent, Tomi Oladipo, says the army often sets up checkpoints on roads in the troubled region to stop the militants, and it could be that the gunmen copied the tactic to catch their victims unawares.

Boko Haram has waged a deadly insurgency since 2009 in its bid to create an Islamic state in the mainly Muslim north of religiously mixed Nigeria.

It has been blamed for many violent attacks which have claimed the lives of nearly 2,000 people since 2011.

The group's name translates as "Western education is forbidden", and it has carried out several attacks on schools and colleges, seeing them as a symbol of Western culture.

Last month, up to 50 students died when suspected Boko Haram militants attacked an agricultural college in the north-east.

The Nigerian military said in August that it might have killed the group's leader, Abubakar Shekau, in a shoot-out.

However, a video released last week purportedly showed him alive.

Other previous reports of his death later proved to be unfounded.
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PostPosted: 24-10-2013 14:53    Post subject: Reply with quote

Full text at link.

Quote:
Vigilantes push Boko Haram from their Nigerian base
Local knowledge of informer group a ‘game-changer’ in fight against insurgents

The men from Boko Haram came tearing through the rural town of Benisheik, setting fire to houses, looting, shooting and yelling, “God is great!” residents and officials said. The gunmen shot motorists point-blank on the road, dragged young men out of homes for execution and ordered citizens to lie down for a fatal bullet.

When it was all over more than 12 hours later, they said about 150 people were dead, and even four weeks later, this once-thriving town of 35,000 is a burned out, empty shell of blackened houses and charred vehicles.
Boko Haram, Nigeria’s home-grown Islamist insurgent movement, remains a deadly threat in the countryside, a militant group eager to prove its jihadi bona fides and increasingly populated by fighters from Mali, Mauritania and Algeria, said the governor of Borno state, Kashim Shettima.

But about 40 miles away in Maiduguri, the sprawling state capital from where the militant group emerged, Boko Haram has been largely defeated for now, according to officials, activists and residents. It’s a remarkable turnaround that has brought thousands of people back to the streets. The city of two million, until recently emptied of thousands of terrified inhabitants, is bustling again after four years of fear.

Vigilante informers
For several months, there have been no shootings or bombings in Maiduguri, and the sense of relief – with women lingering at market stalls on the sandy streets and men chatting under the shade of feathery green neem trees in the 95-degree heat – is palpable.

Boko Haram has been pushed out of Maiduguri largely because of the efforts of a network of youthful informer-vigilantes fed up with the routine violence and ideology of the insurgents they grew up with. “I’m looking at these people: they collect your money, they kill you – Muslims, Christians,” said the network’s founder, Baba Lawal Ja’faar (32), a car and sheep salesman by trade. “The Boko Haram are saying, ‘Don’t go to the school; don’t go to the hospital’. It’s all rubbish.”

Shettima has recruited the vigilantes for “training” and is paying them $100 a month. In the sandy Fezzan neighbourhood of low cinder block houses, where the informer group was nurtured over the past two years, the walls are pockmarked with bullet holes from shootouts with the Islamists, a visible sign of the motivations for fighting the insurgents. ...

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/world/africa/vigilantes-push-boko-haram-from-their-nigerian-base-1.1570907
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PostPosted: 26-10-2013 12:27    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Nigerian militants raid northern city of Damaturu
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-24672632

File photo of Nigerian troops patrolling in Borno state, August 2013

The Nigerian military has stepped up operations against Boko Haram in the north

Suspected Boko Haram militants have engaged security forces in a lengthy gun battle and raided a hospital in the northern Nigerian city of Damaturu.

Residents told the BBC that it was a "big, audacious attack" and that assailants stole drugs from the hospital and drove off in ambulances.

Meanwhile, the military said it had killed 74 suspected Boko Haram militants in a raid in Borno state.

Authorities have recently stepped up their campaign against the militants.

North-eastern Nigeria is the focus of an insurgency by the group that began in 2009 and aims to create an Islamic state.

President Goodluck Jonathan urged the military to up its campaign against Boko Haram five months ago.

Damaturu is the main city in Yobe state, which lies to the west of Borno. It has been calm for more than a year, and there is a large military presence in there.

'Slow response'
Nonetheless, gunfire rocked the city for some seven hours after a group of about 20 gunmen - some in military uniform - targeted the hospital late on Thursday.

Clashes between militants and the security forces spread to other parts of the city. A health worker described seeing a police vehicle ferrying corpses to the mortuary.

The resident who described the attack as "audacious" said the gunfire was heavy, continuous, and loud.

He also said that people in Damaturu were surprised that it had taken the military at least an hour to respond.

Authorities later imposed a 24-hour curfew, and streets were deserted on Friday.

The military raid in Borno state involved "ground and aerial assault" and "led to the destruction of the identified terrorist camps," said army spokesman Lt Mohammed Dole.

Lt Dole said the latest raid had been carried out on Thursday and that two soldiers had been wounded.

The BBC's Will Ross reports from Nigeria that it seems surprising that Boko Haram camps are still being found, given all the resources available to the army.

The army's claims about military operations against the group are hard to verify - there has been no mobile phone network in Borno state since the latest offensive was launched.

Nigeria's campaign has been criticised by human rights groups.

Amnesty International said earlier this month that hundreds had died in detention in north-eastern Nigeria, some from starvation or extra-judicial killings.

Nigeria's interior said the report was "not true".
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PostPosted: 04-11-2013 12:01    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Nigerian wedding party in Borno State massacred by gunmen
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-24798395

File photo of Nigerian troops patrolling in Borno state, August 2013

The Nigerian military has stepped up operations against Boko Haram in the north

Gunmen in north-eastern Nigeria have killed more than 30 people in a attack on a wedding convoy.

It happened on a notoriously dangerous stretch of road between Bama and Banki in Borno State, east of the regional capital Maiduguri.

The groom was reportedly amongst the victims.

The Islamist militant group Boko Haram has carried out frequent attacks in the area despite a state of emergency declared in north-east Nigeria in May.

Thousands of additional troops have been sent there to fight Boko Haram - which had been fighting to create an Islamic state since 2009. However attacks on civilians have continued.

A week ago dozens of people were killed during a lengthy gunfight after suspected militants attacked the town of Damaturu, burning police and military buildings.

A motorist who saw the bodies told AFP news agency that many of the victims appeared to have suffered gunshot wounds.

"All the victims were brutally murdered by the attackers," said the driver, who did not wish to be named.

"My passengers and I were shocked when we met the dead bodies lying by the highway."

The fate of the bride and her family members is unknown.
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PostPosted: 23-11-2013 10:09    Post subject: Reply with quote

More hamfisted actions by the police.

Quote:
Nigeria's Boko Haram crisis: Anger at lecturer Nazeef's arrest
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-25051886

Suspected Boko Haram sect members from left - Muhammed Nazeef Yunus, Umar Musa, Mustapha Yusuf, Ismaila Abdulazeez, and Ibrahim Isah - are paraded by Nigeria's secret police, in Abuja, Nigeria - 20 Wednesday November 2013

Lecturer Muhammed Nazeef Yunus (L) said he preached against Boko Haram

The family of a Nigerian Islamic studies lecturer accused of being a Boko Haram leader has told the BBC that his arrest was a "set up".

They said it was outrageous to suggest he belonged to the militants behind the insurgency in northern Nigeria.

Muhammad Nazeef Yunus was paraded before journalists this week, accused of recruiting militants in the central Kogi state where he lectures.

"In his research thesis, he condemned Boko Haram," his brother told the BBC.

Boko Haram's insurgency, which began in earnest in 2010, has centred in the largely Muslim north-east of Nigeria, where three states have been under emergency rule since May as the security forces try to crush the militants.

The group, which is opposed to Western education, wants to impose strict Islamic law in northern Nigeria.

Several thousand people have been killed in the past three years.

'Critical of authorities'

Mr Nazeef, who is an assistant lecturer in Arabic and Islamic Studies at Kogi State University, was paraded along with four other suspects accused by the secret police of plotting to launch attacks in Igalaland, Kogi state.

The BBC's Ishaq Khalid in Jos, the capital of Plateau state where the lecturer and his family live, says Mr Nazeef was arrested on 29 October, a few days after publicly criticising the Nigerian authorities.

In a sermon at a mosque in Jos he had said the way heads of security agencies were appointed was a concern, suggesting they were biased against Muslims, our reporter says.

"Certainly, this is a set up," the lecturer's wife, Sa'adatu Shu'aibu, told the BBC Hausa Service about the arrest.

"[Everybody] knows that Nazeef Yunus is not a member of Boko Haram. People are witnesses to his preaching and I also listen to recordings of the preaching and I never heard him preach violence," she said.

His brother, Hadi Yunus, agreed that Mr Nazeef, who is also the director of a secondary school in Jos which follows an Islamic and Western curriculum, often lectured against the ideologies of Boko Haram.

One of the suspects arrested along with Mr Nazeef said he was recruited in May after he lost his job and was paid ($315, £195) a month by the group.

Along with the other young men paraded before journalists in the capital, Abuja, he alleged that he had been indoctrinated by Mr Nazeef, the alleged leader of the cell in Kogi state.

"I was shocked when the other suspects insisted that I was a member and the one that recruited them into the sect. I have never been a member of Boko Haram for one minute in my life, I even preach against them," he said.

Boko Haram, which along with its offshoot Ansaru, was last week blacklisted as a terrorist organisation by the US.

On Wednesday, MPs in Nigeria's lower house of parliament unanimously backed extending the state of emergency in the north-east for a further six months following a closed-door briefing by security chiefs.

The upper house had already given its consent after President Goodluck Jonathan's extension request earlier this month.
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PostPosted: 24-11-2013 11:44    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Nigeria raid: Suspected Boko Haram gunmen kill 12
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-25073702

Map of Sandiya, Borno state, Nigeria

Suspected Boko Haram Islamists have killed 12 people in a raid on a village in north-east Nigeria, police say.

Police said about 30 gunmen also burnt houses and stole cars in the village of Sandiya, in Borno state.

One resident, quoted by the AFP news agency, said Boko Haram accused villagers of collaborating with the security forces to track them down.

President Goodluck Jonathan declared a state of emergency in parts of north-east Nigeria in May.

A resident of Sandiya, Modu Judum, told the Reuters news agency that about 30 armed men, travelling in a convoy of pick-up trucks and motorcycles "stormed the Sandiya village and started chanting 'Allahu Akbar' [God is great], before opening fire on the helpless".


"Hoodlums invaded the community and killed 12 people," said Borno state police commissioner Lawal Tanko in a statement.

He said the gunmen burnt scores of houses and stole several vehicles in Thursday's raid on the village, which is about 85km (53 miles) from the Borno state capital, Maiduguri.

The Nigerian government imposed a state of emergency in Borno and two other areas of northeast Nigeria in May, to try to combat Boko Haram.

In recent months, the Islamist group has carried out a series of raids in remote north-eastern areas of Nigeria, killing hundreds of civilians.

"The gunmen were on a revenge mission," Sandiya resident Sabitu Ali told AFP.

"They are accusing us of collaborating with security men in tracking them."

Boko Haram, which was declared a foreign terrorist organisation by the United States earlier this month, is fighting to create an Islamic state in the north of Nigeria, where Muslims are in the majority.
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PostPosted: 02-12-2013 21:14    Post subject: Reply with quote

Will Rose of the BBC raises an interesting question: How is it that significant numbers of well-armed Boko Haram militants are still driving around Borno State causing havoc?

Quote:
Analysis

Will Ross
BBC News, Lagos

Once again there is a startling discrepancy between the official version and eyewitness accounts of these pre-dawn attacks on Maiduguri. The lack of clarity is not helped by the fact that the mobile phone networks have been switched off for months.

We are told only two military personnel were injured - an extremely surprising statement given that these co-ordinated attacks on the city's air base and other military barracks lasted for hours and left buildings as well as aircraft destroyed.

In recent months most of the violence has been in rural areas and Maiduguri had seemed far safer than it used to be.

But this attack right at the heart of the military is an embarrassing setback and ought to lead to tough questions over security lapses.

How is it that significant numbers of well-armed Boko Haram militants are still driving around Borno State causing havoc?



Quote:
Nigeria crisis: Boko Haram attack Maiduguri airbase
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-25187142

No traffic is visible on Kashim Ibrahim Way in the heart of Maiduguri on 02/12/2013

Main roads in Maiduguri were deserted on Monday in the wake of the attack

Boko Haram insurgents have attacked a military airbase in north-eastern Nigeria, destroying two helicopters, the authorities say.

Eyewitnesses say hundreds of militants attacked several areas of the city of Maiduguri, starting early on Monday.

A 24-hour curfew has been imposed in Maiduguri. Its civilian airport was also briefly closed.

A BBC correspondent says the large-scale, co-ordinated attack is a big setback for the Nigerian military.

Thousands of people have been killed since 2009, when Boko Haram launched its campaign to install Islamic law.

In May, a state of emergency was declared in Borno state, of which Maiduguri is the capital, as well as two neighbouring states, while there has been a massive military deployment to the worst-affected areas.

'Crying and wailing'
Ministry of Defence spokesman Brig Gen Chris Olukolade said in a statement that two helicopters and three decommissioned military aircraft had been "incapacitated" during the attack which had been repelled.

He said some army bases had also been targeted, while 24 insurgents had been killed and two soldiers wounded.

Local residents told the AFP news agency that hundreds of heavily armed Islamist gunmen besieged the air force and army bases, razing buildings and setting shops and petrol stations ablaze.

"I saw two air force helicopters burnt," a local official told AFP.

Bomb and gun attacks were carried out in Maiduguri, an AFP reporter in the city said.

A resident said: "We heard women and children in the barracks crying and wailing. At the gate, I saw some vehicles destroyed and the checkpoint there in shreds."

There are reports of military checkpoints being attacked in different parts of the city.

Some eyewitnesses told the AP news agency they had seen bodies with their throats slit.

Others said several vehicles had been driven out of the air base carrying the bodies of victims.

map
Government and military officials said scores of people may be dead, AP reported.

A spokesman for the Nigerian civil aviation authority told the BBC that the airport had not been attacked, while Brig Gen Olukolade said flights had now resumed.

Recent Boko Haram attacks have been in more rural areas, and it had appeared as though the military operation had made Maiduguri city far safer, says the BBC Nigeria correspondent Will Ross.

Mobile phone links to the city have been cut since May, when the state of emergency was declared.

Boko Haram was founded in Maiduguri in 2002 and was also the scene of its first uprising, in 2009.
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PostPosted: 16-12-2013 21:13    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Nigeria Boko Haram emergency: 'More than 1,200 killed'
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-25407126

Burned out lorry near air force base in Maiduguri. 2 Dec 2013

Attacks by Boko Haram have been continuing despite a big military offensive

The UN says more than 1,200 people have been killed in Islamist-related violence in north-east Nigeria since a state of emergency was declared in May.

The UN said the figure related to killings of civilians and the military by the Islamist group Boko Haram in the states of Adamawa, Borno and Yobe.

It also includes insurgents killed by security forces repelling attacks.

This is the first time independent casualty figures have been issued since emergency rule was declared.

Thousands of people have been killed since 2009, when Boko Haram launched its campaign to install strict Islamic law in northern Nigeria.

'Scarce information'

The figures, released on Monday, do not include those killed during military operations, a spokesman for the UN Office for the Co-ordination of Humanitarian Affairs (Ocha) told the AFP news agency.

"The humanitarian situation in north-east Nigeria has been increasingly worrisome over the course of 2013," the UN said.

There have been 48 separate "Boko Haram-related" attacks in the region since emergency rule was declared, its statement added.

"Information on the situation is scarce", with figures of those displaced by the conflict and those who have fled to neighbouring states "hard to gauge", Ocha said.

In May, a state of emergency was declared in Borno state, of which Maiduguri is the capital, as well as Adamawa and Yobe, while there has been a massive military deployment to the worst-affected areas.

Attacks by Boko Haram are continuing despite the big military offensive.

The military initially switched off the mobile network across the region, apparently to block Islamists from co-ordinating attacks.

Boko Haram was founded in Maiduguri in 2002 and the city was also the scene of its first uprising in 2009.
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PostPosted: 21-12-2013 13:32    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Nigeria insurgents attack Bama military barracks
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-25472369

The UN says more than 1,200 people have been killed in Islamist-related violence since emergency rule

Suspected Islamist militants have attacked a military barracks in north-eastern Nigeria in a fierce battle that lasted for several hours.

The military later deployed fighter jets to put an end to the assault on the camp on the outskirts of Bama town.

Families of soldiers inside the barracks and Bama residents say women and children are among the dead.

This is the second serious attack on the military this month in a region which is under emergency law.

For several years, militants from the Boko Haram group have been fighting an insurgency in the mainly Muslim area to impose strict Islamic law in northern Nigeria.

A vehicle burnt by the Islamist group Boko Haram in the north-eastern town of Bama - 7 May 2013
It is not the first time that Bama has come under attack this year
It is not the first time that Bama, which is about 40km (25 miles) south-east of the Borno state capital, Maiduguri, has been attacked.

In May, Boko Haram fighters raided the town's barracks, police station and government buildings, killing more than 50 people and freeing 105 prisoners.

A week later the government declared a state of emergency in Borno and two neighbouring states, Adamawa and Yobe.

map
A Bama resident told the BBC Hausa service that the attack began at about 03:00 local time (02:00 GMT) on Friday and gunfire and explosions were heard.

The aerial bombardment began at about 06:00 and the fighting died down about an hour later, he said.

Several residents told the AFP news agency that the insurgents had swarmed the barracks in a convoy of 4x4 trucks, armed with assault rifles, explosives and rocket-propelled-grenades.

The BBC's Will Ross in Nigeria says that despite claims of success by Nigerian officials, it is clear that the Islamist fighters still pose a considerable threat to the stability of the country.

Earlier this month, Boko Haram launched co-ordinated attacks on Maiduguri's air base and other military barracks that left buildings as well as aircraft destroyed.

The UN said this week that more than 1,200 people had been killed in Islamist-related violence in north-east since the state of emergency was declared.
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