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Albino Animals
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rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
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PostPosted: 23-04-2012 20:12    Post subject: Reply with quote

lordmongrove wrote:
At the other end of the colour range i one saw a totaly black giraffe at Lake Manyara, Tanzania in 1985.

We demand photos!

(They didn't have photoshop then, did they? Wink )
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lordmongroveOffline
Great Old One
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PostPosted: 24-04-2012 10:50    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had photos but they were taken by my late farther's wife who later devvorced him (amicably). I see her now and again. I'll have to ask her if she still has them.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 14-09-2013 07:13    Post subject: Reply with quote

Owners bring albino crow on holiday to the Lizard: PICTURES
6:00am Saturday 14th September 2013 in News .

The packet.co.uk has brought you some strange stories in the past, but perhaps none as strange as an albino crow on holiday on the Lizard.
The bird was turning heads at Mullion Cove on Monday after its owners brought it out for a show and tell.

Called Polaris, the crow lives with John and Lisa of the International Centre for Birds of Prey, a worldwide conservation group based in Gloucestershire.
They rescued Polaris after he was thrown out of the family nest as a chick, presumably because of its rare colourings.

Visitors to the cove were fascinated by the bird, which had already visited Land’s End and had stopped off at Mullion before making his way to The Lizard.

Bob Felce, who lives in Mullion, was among those who happened to be at the cove when Polaris caused a stir.
He said: “People were asking if he was an albino chough. They look quite similar, but only in shape. He was an interesting visitor for other visitors in the cove and it was a real change to see something like that.”

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/10672032.Owners_bring_albino_crow_on_holiday_to_the_Lizard__PICTURES/?ref=mr
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rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
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PostPosted: 16-11-2013 23:22    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rare albino kangaroo sighted in Australia
Rare albino kangaroo spotted near Canberra, prompting wonder at its success in evading wild dogs and foxes
By Jonathan Pearlman, Sydney
3:30PM GMT 15 Nov 2013

A rare albino kangaroo has been spotted roaming bushland outside Australia’s capital, surprising wildlife experts who say such creatures are easy prey and usually die young.

The kangaroo, an eastern grey, is believed to be two years old. Experts said this is old for an albino kangaroo, which stands out against the Australian bushland and therefore attracts more predators such as wild foxes and dogs. Albinos are also apparently more susceptible to skin cancer and sunburn and are more likely to have sight and hearing difficulties.

“Grey kangaroos are grey for a reason — they blend in with the rest of the environment,” a parks ranger, Brett McNamara, told The Canberra Times.

The albino, first captured on film last weekend by a park ranger at the Namadgi national park near Canberra, stands in stark contrast to the family of grey kangaroos with which it roams.
However, Mr McNamara said the albino’s closeness to its family may have helped to protect it. Rangers have not been able to get close enough to the kangaroo to definitely determine its gender but believe it is female and have nicknamed it Renee.
“They do form very close-knit mobs within that valley,” he said.
“There would be a dominant male kangaroo, there would be a harem of females that he would be keeping a close eye on, then there would be some adults and obviously the juveniles coming through.”

The rangers have refused to reveal the exact location of the kangaroo amid concerns about illegal hunting.
“We are concerned about its ongoing welfare because of some illegal hunting activities that do occur in the park,” Mr McNamara said.
“That something like this can occur, I know it’s all a bit clichéd, but literally a stone’s throw from the nation’s capital - what other national capital anywhere in the world could you do something like that?

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/australiaandthepacific/australia/10451699/Rare-albino-kangaroo-sighted-in-Australia.html

"Rangers have not been able to get close enough to the kangaroo to definitely determine its gender but believe it is female and have nicknamed it Renee"
At least they avoided Snowy!

"..what other national capital anywhere in the world could you do something like that?"
Who knows what's hopping, slithering, or lurking around the Olympic site in east London nowadays? Wink
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 07-07-2014 08:16    Post subject: Reply with quote

East Grinstead goes nuts for albino squirrels as one sets up home in garden of retired couple
By East Grinstead Courier Posted: July 07, 2014
By Jo Gilbert

SURREY is known for its wooded areas, its cricket club and affluent population.
But wildlife experts say it may soon become known for its population of albino squirrels, though no one knows why.

The odds of a pure white squirrel being born are estimated to be one in 100,000, and with 2.5 million grey squirrels in the UK, this would suggest that there are only about 25 white ones out there at any one time.

But a number of albino squirrels are known to have made their homes in Surrey, and one at least is now living in nearby East Grinstead - where a retired couple have it living in their garden.
Suzanne and Tony Marshall, who first noticed their new resident around Christmas, were so impressed by the little creature they couldn't wait to show him – or her – off to their visitors.

Suzanne, 73, said: "I read about them in the news, how rare they are. He was so small and lovely that when the family came over at Christmas we left peanuts outside the door so we could show him off to them. Now we've got into the habit and we leave peanuts out for him most days.

"There's one tree he's taken a shine to. We have five large oaks in our garden and one of them is overgrown with ivy so he loves to climb and jump around. We haven't seen any other white squirrels or what could be family members. He tends to keep himself to himself."

The Lambourn Close couple, who have two children and four grandchildren, used to run Suttons, an interior design showroom in the High Street, which is now Café Nero.
They spend their time looking after their two vintage cars and gardening, and looking forward to their almost daily visitor.
Although they have not named him – squirrels do not make good pets – they admit they do feel protective of him, and feel he must still be very young as he keeps "falling out of the trees".

Albinism is due to gene mutations affecting production of pigmentation in the skin, and can be passed on through generations.
Wildlife expert Liza Lipscombe, from the British Wildlife Centre in Lingfield, which currently has its own albino squirrel in residence, said: "Despite their unusual appearance, when you spot a white squirrel it really is a grey squirrel that's missing its natural colouring. Albinos are a natural, though uncommon occurrence, but albino squirrels are spotted quite often in parts of the South East and Surrey for some reason, although no one seems to know why.

"Albinos can have a tough time in the wild, losing any natural benefits of camouflage, or may be rejected by others of their kind. But as they are tree dwelling and very quick on their feet, squirrels have very few natural predators and albino squirrels often survive as long as grey ones."

Albi became a national celebrity and following his death flowers and tributes – including a poem – were left by the roadside where he died, together with cards, flowers and bags of nuts.

http://www.eastgrinsteadcourier.co.uk/East-Grinstead-goes-nuts-albino-squirrels-sets/story-21313423-detail/story.html

With photos
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 12-08-2014 09:46    Post subject: Reply with quote

It will be 'all white' - Albino lobster comes face-to-face with his former self
Updated 10:24am Tuesday 12th August 2014

IT WILL be ‘all white’ on the night again as albino lobster Claws came face-to-face with his former self after moulting.
Staff at Weymouth Sea Life Park breathed a sigh of relief after their one-in-a-hundred million albino lobster Santa Claws moulted and turned out all white again.

The unique crustacean was given to the Weymouth attraction by an astonished Bridport fisherman just before Christmas 2011 – hence his festive themed name. [One for the punsters!]

After his moult Claws posed for a picture with his former self.
Curator Fiona Smith said: “It was odds on his new coat would still be white, but when an animal is as rare as this one there’s always that anxious feeling that maybe his white shell was a one-off aberration and the next one would be the normal bluey-grey.”

Claws lives in the outdoor rock pool feature and since arriving at the park he has grown a few centimetres, hence his need to moult and get a new coat.
Aquarist John Elliott said: “Lobsters manage to squeeze out of their shell leaving everything intact, even the claws.
“So now we can put his old suit on display and use it to amaze visitors with when we’re showing off Santa and passing on a few secrets of lobster biology.”

There is a brief period after shedding their shells when lobsters are soft-bodied and vulnerable to attack, so they usually fine a handy hole to hide in until their new shell hardens.
Happily for Santa Claws, in his private submarine home, there was no such danger.

Staff have been trying to brush off a growth of algae on his shell but Claws has decided the feature is there to stay and won’t let them brush him, swiping his claws around to show his displeasure.

http://www.dorsetecho.co.uk/news/11403110.It_will_be__all_white____Albino_lobster_comes_face_to_face_with_his_former_self/
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