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rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
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PostPosted: 15-12-2013 22:26    Post subject: Reply with quote

escargot1 wrote:
How about the Old Time Radio site? Very Happy

Life's too short! (Well, mine probably is.) I'm interested in too many things to go researching them all, so I have to content myself with enjoying whatever of interest happens to come my way.

And some things I don't even know I'm interested in until they pop up in front of me. We live in an incredibly information-rich society, which can be quite stressful to deal with if you don't limit yourself. As the popular saying has it: Too much information! (It applies to more than just sex and other dubious activities!)
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rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
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PostPosted: 18-12-2013 09:41    Post subject: Reply with quote

17 December 2013 Last updated at 11:51

Rare war-time 'disappearing pillbox' found at Evanton

A rare example of a type of World War II pillbox that could "disappear" has been found at a former military airfield in the Highlands.
The Pickett-Hamilton fort was part of the defences at Evanton in Ross-shire, but after the war was dumped on the nearby shoreline.

The cylindrical pillbox could be raised and lowered from the ground.
It was designed to launch surprise counter attacks against enemy paratroopers.
When lowered, the fort was flush with the ground so that it did not affect the landing and take off of aircraft from the runways they defended.

Prime Minister Winston Churchill took an interest in the development of the innovative machinegun posts.
New Kent Construction Company of Ashford, which submitted the designs and went on to manufacture the forts, described the defences as a "disappearing pillbox".
But, according to airfield archaeologist Paul Francis, just 335 were installed in the UK because they were too small to accommodate new weapons.

The damaged Ross-shire fort had been unrecorded by modern day archaeologists and historians.
However, it has now been documented by the Evanton Wartime Remains project, which has gathered information on more than 160 military sites at the Highland airfield and the surrounding area.
The project drew on the recollections of local people, scoured military maps and archives and also used online aerial images to glean information on the sites and surviving structures.

Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands (Arch), Inverness Young Archaeologists Club and pupils from Kiltearn Primary and Dingwall Academy have been involved.

The project team described the Pickett-Hamilton pillbox as "rare".
A spokesperson said: "Unexpected finds include three unrecorded pillboxes, including a Pickett-Hamilton fort which could be raised and lowered, and a Norcon pillbox, said by one commentator to be possibly the most dangerous, cheap and nasty of all the pillbox designs." Shocked
The entrance hatch, remains of hand holds inside and pipes for hand-operated equipment survive on the Pickett-Hamilton pillbox.

Tangmere Military Aviation Museum, near Chichester in West Sussex, has one of the few examples of a complete fort.

The museum said racing driver Donald Campbell, who died on Coniston Water in 1967 during a water speed record bid, offered his workshops for the construction of the prototypes.
Campbell also watched trials of the fort at Andover airfield in 1940.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-25413892
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CochiseOffline
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PostPosted: 18-12-2013 10:09    Post subject: Reply with quote

I do very much remember the day poor Donald Campbell died. A very brave man whose exploits never quite got the credit they deserved. Record breaking in the post war world was a much tougher - and more expensive - prospect then when his father was at his peak in the 30's.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 19-12-2013 21:55    Post subject: Reply with quote

A lot of people now are into genealogy, which almost always uncovers forgotten history. The BBC have catered to this with the long running "Who do you think you are" series, but only tonight did I discover another ancestry research prog on the beeb called Coming Home: this is the last of series 8 (How did I miss all the rest! Shocked ):

Coming Home - Series 8 - 4. John Humphrys

BBC journalist and Mastermind host John Humphrys makes a poignant journey to his home town of Cardiff in search of his Welsh ancestry. Joined by his brother Graham, John learns of the shipwreck that changed the course of his family history and the moving story of his great grandmother's childhood in an orphanage.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b03lskbb/Coming_Home_Series_8_John_Humphrys/

Duration 29 minutes: Available until 7:59PM Mon, 23 Dec 2013

I prefer the format of this programme: although shorther than WDYTYA it seems to pack as much in, probably because it starts as far back as practible and then works forward to the present.

Well, there are still some other episode on iPlayer to catch up on!
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MonstrosaOffline
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PostPosted: 20-12-2013 12:21    Post subject: Reply with quote

Unlocking the secrets of the scrolls of Herculaneum

Quote:
The British Museum's 2013 show of artefacts from the Roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum, buried in ash during an explosive eruption of Mount Vesuvius, was a sell-out. But could even greater treasures - including lost works of classical literature - still lie underground?

For centuries scholars have been hunting for the lost works of ancient Greek and Latin literature. In the Renaissance, books were found in monastic libraries. In the late 19th Century papyrus scrolls were found in the sands of Egypt. But only in Herculaneum in southern Italy has an entire library from the ancient Mediterranean been discovered in situ.

On the eve of the catastrophe in 79 AD, Herculaneum was a chic resort town on the Bay of Naples, where many of Rome's top families went to rest and recuperate during the hot Italian summers.

It was also a place where Rome's richest engaged in a bit of cultural one-upmanship - none more so than Lucius Calpurnius Piso Caesoninus, a politician and father-in-law of Julius Caesar.

In Herculaneum, Piso built a seaside villa on a palatial scale - the width of its beach frontage alone exceeds 220m (721ft). When it was excavated in the middle of the 18th Century, it was found to hold more than 80 bronze and marble statues of the highest quality, including one of Pan having sex with a goat...


Fascinating article on new techniques to read the carbonised scrolls.
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 23-12-2013 15:30    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Irish are 'the forgotten white’ slaves’ claims expert
Ireland was the greatest victim of British slave trade he says
By IrishCentral Staff Writers,
Published Monday, December 23, 2013, 8:11 AM
http://www.irishcentral.com/roots/Irish-the-forgotten-white-slaves-says-expert-John-Martin-188645531.html#ixzz2oJOt5cAE

An Irish family pictured in Barbados
Photo by barbadostripadvisor

The history of the African slave trade into the America’s is one that is well-documented as well as largely taught in American schools today.

However, as John Martin of the Montreal-based Center for Research and Globalization points out in his article ‘The Irish Slave Trade - The Forgotten ‘White’ Slaves,’ it was not just Africans who were traded as slaves.

Indeed, the Irish have a gruesome history as being traded as slaves as well and subjected to similar and sometimes worse treatment than their African contemporaries of the time.

Strangely though, the history of Irish and ‘white’ slavery is by and large ignored in the American educational curriculum today.

In his article, John Martin writes “The Irish slave trade began when James II sold 30,000 Irish prisoners as slaves to the New World. His Proclamation of 1625 required Irish political prisoners be sent overseas and sold to English settlers in the West Indies. By the mid 1600s, the Irish were the main slaves sold to Antigua and Montserrat. At that time, 70 percent of the total population of Montserrat were Irish slaves.”

Read more articles on Irish history here

“Ireland quickly became the biggest source of human livestock for English merchants. The majority of the early slaves to the New World were actually white.”

Martin writes how at the hands of the British, the Irish population plummeted due to the slave trade of the 17th century.

“During the 1650s, over 100,000 Irish children between the ages of 10 and 14 were taken from their parents and sold as slaves in the West Indies, Virginia and New England. In this decade, 52,000 Irish (mostly women and children) were sold to Barbados and Virginia. Another 30,000 Irish men and women were also transported and sold to the highest bidder. In 1656, [Oliver] Cromwell ordered that 2000 Irish children be taken to Jamaica and sold as slaves to English settlers.”

Martin goes on to explain that for some reason, the Irish slaves are often remembered as ‘indentured servants.’ However, in most cases during the 17th and 18th centuries, they were no more than “human cattle.”

“...the African slave trade was just beginning during this same period,” writes Martin. “It is well recorded that African slaves, not tainted with the stain of the hated Catholic theology and more expensive to purchase, were often treated far better than their Irish counterparts.”

During the late 1600s, writes Martin, African slaves were far more expensive than their Irish counterparts - Africans would sell for around 50 sterling while Irish were often no more than 5 sterling.

Further, the treatment of Irish slaves was thought to be more cruel than that of African slaves. If an Irish slave was beaten by their owner, it wasn’t considered to be a crime.

The Irish were further exploited when the British began to “breed” Irish women - or girls, sometimes as young as 12 - with African males.

“These new “mulatto” slaves brought a higher price than Irish livestock and, likewise, enabled the settlers to save money rather than purchase new African slaves. This practice of interbreeding Irish females with African men went on for several decades and was so widespread that, in 1681, legislation was passed “forbidding the practice of mating Irish slave women to African slave men for the purpose of producing slaves for sale.” In short, it was stopped only because it interfered with the profits of a large slave transport company.”

Martin concludes, “In 1839, Britain finally decided on it’s own to end its participation in Satan’s highway to hell and stopped transporting slaves. While their decision did not stop pirates from doing what they desired, the new law slowly concluded THIS chapter of nightmarish Irish misery.”

The Irish Slave Trade – The Forgotten “White” Slaves
http://www.globalresearch.ca/the-irish-slave-trade-the-forgotten-white-slaves/31076
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 25-12-2013 09:59    Post subject: Reply with quote

World War Two uneaten Christmas cake story revealed

The story behind an uneaten World War Two Christmas cake has been revealed 30 years after it was donated to a museum.
Research by the Royal Navy Submarine Museum uncovered the full story of submariner Bert Hamilton Smith.
Mr Smith, from Nottingham, never returned home to eat his treat, which was purchased for his Christmas leave in 1939.
He was lost at sea in 1941 after a depth charge attack on the submarine HMS P33.

The museum said the story was a "timely reminder" of the separation felt at Christmas by those serving in the Royal Navy.
The museum in Gosport, Hampshire "stumbled upon" previously unseen letters in its archives written by Mr Smith's sister Flo Burbage, who donated the cake in 1983.
Her information combined with archive records revealed Mr Smith, born in 1905, was due to return in 1939 after serving on the submarine HMS Osiris in the Mediterranean that Christmas.

On his return to the UK he sent a short telegram to reassure his family saying: "The wanderer returned for brief spell still in one piece".
But he never had the chance to return home as he was reposted to Scotland to join the crew of the submarine HMS P33, which was heading for Malta.

In August 1941 the submarine was sent to intercept an enemy convoy off the coast of Libya but was sunk following reports of a depth charge attack lasting several hours.
Mr Smith's body was never found and has been declared lost at sea.

The full story behind his uneaten cake can now be viewed in the museum's area of remembrance.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-25495087
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MythopoeikaOffline
I am a meat popsicle
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PostPosted: 26-12-2013 20:34    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am simply amazed that the cake appears to be intact.
I suppose it's because it's been kept in a tin, in the right conditions.

I remember my Grandma and Grandad back in the early 80s getting a Christmas cake in a box, given to them by old friends.
Oddly, the box looked a bit old and faded, which had them puzzled (stylistically, it looked 20 years old).
When they opened it up, there was a nasty brown powder inside - so they threw it away.
Their old friends had apparently kept a cake for 20 years before giving it to them...I think they were pretty poor or something.

We still laugh about it today, although my grandparents and their friends are long gone...
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OneWingedBirdOffline
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PostPosted: 26-12-2013 21:34    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am told that army rations include sealed fruit cake due to it's exceedingly long life.

I am also told it makes an effective anti-personnel weapon. Laughing
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George_millettOffline
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PostPosted: 26-12-2013 22:35    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm Fairly sure use of it is in contravention of the Geneva Convention. Wink
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JamesWhiteheadOffline
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PostPosted: 27-12-2013 00:20    Post subject: Reply with quote

An 1898 wedding-cake survives uneaten to this day, according to the Mail!

I doubt if anyone is going to spoil its reputation by eating it now.

We have references on the Board to Ilfracombe Museum, which proudly displays a selection of morsels from gentry wedding-cakes of the Victorian period.

I saw them forty years ago - but they looked quite tasty then! Smile
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kamalktkOffline
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PostPosted: 03-01-2014 13:27    Post subject: Reply with quote

The US military once built an nuclear powered under-ice base in Greenland.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Ujx_pND9wg
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MythopoeikaOffline
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PostPosted: 03-01-2014 20:03    Post subject: Reply with quote

I seem to recall posting about that base on the 'underground' thread fairly recently.
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CochiseOffline
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PostPosted: 04-01-2014 11:15    Post subject: Reply with quote

A properly made fruit cake will last for years. People used to keep pieces of wedding cake for decades. Dad used to make wedding cakes as a weekend job - I used to help him decorate them when I was small. I've loads of pictures of them because his customers often used to send him a picture of the great day.

I've no actual cake though.

You won't get anywhere trying to keep a modern cake unless its been made to an old recipe. I'm astonished that people put up with feeble sponge cakes and the like for celebrations these days!
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KondoruOffline
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PostPosted: 04-01-2014 18:43    Post subject: Reply with quote

Right, Colchise, Recipes or we sulk.
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