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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 20-04-2013 22:53    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Exploring The Science Behind Medical Acupuncture
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/259226.php
18 Apr 2013

Even as medical acupuncture is increasingly being validated as an effective treatment for a broad range of medical conditions, what has been missing is an understanding of the basic science and mechanisms of action of this age-old method of healing. A special issue of Medical Acupuncture, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers presents a series of articles by authors from around the world who provide diverse and insightful perspectives on the science and physiologic responses underlying medical acupuncture. The issue is available on the Medical Acupuncture website.

"Understanding acupuncture in the same manner that we understand the mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics of a particular drug will, similarly, enable us to match treatments better with conditions," states Guest Editor Richard F. Hobbs, III, MD. "The net effect will be improved outcomes," he writes in his editorial "Basic Science Matters."

In the editorial "Basic Science: Mysteries and Mechanisms of Acupuncture," Richard Niemtzow, MD, PhD, MPH, Editor-in-Chief of Medical Acupuncture, a retired Air Force Colonel and current Director of the USAF Acupuncture Center, Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, suggests that natural events have scientific explanations and that "the two explanations - one scientific, the other environmental - might both elucidate how acupuncture works."

The issue includes a Review article by John Longhurst, MD, PhD, University of California, Irvine, entitled "Acupuncture's Cardiovascular Actions: A Mechanistic Perspective." The article describes how acupuncture's effects on cardiovascular function can decrease elevated blood pressure, improve blood flow, and relieve pain.

Steven Harte, PhD and colleagues from the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor) and Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School (Boston, MA) report the results of a study aimed at understanding the differences in patient responses to traditional vs. sham acupuncture. They used pressure-pain testing to identify patients who may be less likely to respond to sham acupuncture based on levels of neurotransmitters in the brain. The study is described in the article "Pressure Pain Sensitivity and Insular Combined Glutamate and Glutamine (Glx) Are Associated with Subsequent Clinical Response to Sham But Not Traditional Acupuncture in Patients Who Have Chronic Pain." *

Keith Spaulding, ND, MAc and coauthors assessed the electrophysiological differences between actual and nearby (or sham) acupuncture points in the article "Acupuncture Needle Stimulation Induces Changes in Bioelectric Potential."

References:
* http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/acu.2013.0965
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 29-06-2013 21:47    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Acupressure Wristband Relieves Migraine Nausea

28 Jun 2013

Nausea is one of the most debilitating symptoms of migraine and affects 80 percent of migraine suffers in the United States. Leading headache physician, Dr. Zoltan Medgyessy of the Berolina Clinic in Lohne, Germany demonstrated in a trial that pressure to the P6 antiemetic point on the inner wrist with an acupressure wristband is an effective and quick therapy for relieving nausea of migraine sufferers. He will be presenting his findings to the U.S. for the first time at the International Headache Congress in Boston, MA on June 27 - 30, 2013.

Migraine can be a disabling neurological disorder. It affects 36 million Americans, according to the American Migraine Foundation, and is considered by the World Health Organization as the 19th leading cause of all years lived with disability for both males and females.

Dr. Medgyessy's acupressure study with the Department of Headache / Department of Psychosomatic at the Berolina Clinic included 41 patients who experienced an average of 33.1 migraine days during the previous three months with an average nausea intensity of 6.2 out of 10. Patients were given Sea-Band acupressure wristbands instead of antiemetic drugs during a migraine attack and 83 percent of patients noticed reduction of nausea. Reported nausea after therapy was rated a 2.9 out of 10 and relief was reported after an average of 28 minutes. Nearly all participants (98 percent) said they would use Sea-Band again for migraine nausea.

"Acupressure wristbands are drug-free and that is an important advantage in using this therapy for migraine nausea as they have no risks for interaction with migraine drugs or the side effects commonly experienced with antiemetics, such as dizziness or tiredness," commented Dr. Medgyessy. "There are still many unknowns about migraine, making findings such as these an important stride toward improving the quality of life for those who suffer from the condition. I'm grateful that the International Headache Congress has given me a platform to share the results of my team's study and look forward to discussing it with my colleagues."
References:
Approved by the FDA, Sea-Band acupressure wristbands are a leading drug-free remedy for nausea caused by morning sickness, motion sickness, chemotherapy and post-operative nausea. They have also been proven to relieve migraine-related nausea.

Robin Leedy & Associates, Inc.

Citations:

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA
Robin Leedy & Associates, Inc.. "Acupressure Wristband Relieves Migraine Nausea." Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 28 Jun. 2013. Web.
29 Jun. 2013. <http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/262536.php>
APA
Robin Leedy & Associates, Inc.. (2013, June 2Cool. "Acupressure Wristband Relieves Migraine Nausea." Medical News Today. Retrieved from
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/262536.php.
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 17-12-2013 21:42    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Ear Acupuncture Can Help Shed Pounds
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131216204023.htm

Research has shown that ear acupuncture can have an effect on waist circumference, weight and measures of body fat. (Credit: © Klaus Eppele / Fotolia)

Dec. 16, 2013 — Ear acupuncture can help shed the pounds, indicates a small study published online in Acupuncture in Medicine.

Using continuous stimulation of five acupuncture points may be better at reducing abdominal fat (the midriff bulge) than single point stimulation, the findings suggest.

Auricular acupuncture therapy is based on the understanding that the outer ear represents all parts of the body. It was first used in France in 1956 by Dr Paul Nogier who noticed that a patient's back-ache was cured after s/he sustained a burn on the ear.

Since then the approach has been used to treat drug addiction and help people give up smoking and lose weight.

The Korean researchers compared acupuncture of five points on the outer ear -- shen-men (divine gate); spleen, stomach, hunger, and endocrine -- and one point (hunger) -- with sham treatment on 91 overweight adults (BMI of 23 or more).

Participants were asked to follow a restrictive (although not weight loss) diet and not to take any extra exercise during the eight week period of their treatment.

Thirty one people were randomly assigned to the five point treatment, which involved the insertion of acupuncture needles 2mm deep into the outer ear. These were kept in place with surgical tape for a week, after which the same treatment was applied to the other ear, with the process repeated over eight weeks.

Another 30 people were assigned to the same treatment process, but at just the one hunger point. And a further 30 were given sham treatment -- with the same process and timescales, but with the removal of the needles immediately after insertion.

All participants were weighed and measured at the start and end of treatment, and four weeks in, to include BMI, waist circumference, body fat mass, percentage body fat, and blood pressure to see what impact acupuncture might have.

Twenty four people dropped out before the eight weeks were up, 15 of whom were in the sham treatment group, suggesting that perhaps they found it harder to regulate their desire to eat and cope with the restrictive diet, say the authors.

But among those who kept going for the entire period, significant differences were apparent after four weeks, with the active treatment groups showing a 6.1% (5-point treatment) and 5.7% (1-point treatment) reduction, respectively, in BMI compared with the sham treatment group among whom there was no reduction in BMI.

Weight also differed significantly after four weeks in both active treatment groups compared with the sham treatment group.

Waist circumference fell, with the largest drop seen in the group on the 5-point treatment compared with the sham groups, although this difference disappeared after taking account of age.

Measures of body fat also fell after eight weeks, but only in those receiving the 5-point treatment. There were no significant differences in blood pressure among the groups.

The authors conclude that both five and one point approaches can help treat overweight, but that the five point approach may be more appropriate for tackling abdominal fat.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by BMJ-British Medical Journal, via EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS.

Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. For further information, please contact the source cited above.

Journal Reference:

S. Yeo, K. S. Kim, S. Lim. Randomised clinical trial of five ear acupuncture points for the treatment of overweight people. Acupuncture in Medicine, 2013; DOI: 10.1136/acupmed-2013-010435
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