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The Witch Killers
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 24-02-2012 18:20    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Tanzania police arrested over 'witchcraft killing' riot
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-17138958
Continue reading the main story
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In hiding for exposing Tanzania witch-doctors
Tanzania country profile - Overview
Four Tanzanian police officers have been detained after two people were killed during a protest over alleged witchcraft killings.

A regional commander told the BBC that police had opened fire in the south-eastern town of Songea to stop an angry crowd from smashing public property.

The protesters said not enough had been done to find those behind the recent killing of six women.

Police deny the murders were done to obtain body parts for witchcraft use.

In recent years, there have been a spate of killings of people with albinism in Tanzania.

Their body parts are prized in parts of Africa, with witch-doctors claiming they have special powers to bring success in business and love.

The women killed in the Songea area were not believed to be albinos.

Stampede
Ruvuma regional police commander Michael Kamhanda told the BBC that police officers "were forced to use live bullets" after they "had exhausted all means to disperse rowdy crowds".

Thousands of people took to the streets of Songea on Wednesday - after four women were killed and their bodies allegedly mutilated last week.

They attacked the police station and several government offices - and were heading towards a presidential residence when officers opened fire, Mr Kamhanda said.

Two other people were killed during a stampede, the AFP news agency reports.

A total of six women have been killed in the area since November - but Ruvuma police say there is no evidence, despite a widespread belief among local residents, that the killers cut off parts of the bodies for use in witchcraft.
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PostPosted: 02-03-2012 13:01    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Witchcraft murder: Couple guilty of Kristy Bamu killing
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-17040111

Family statement: "We will strive to move forward as a family"

Related Stories

Killers' witchcraft 'obsession'
Calls to end ‘witch’ child abuse
DR Congo's 'child witch' exorcism

A couple have been found guilty of murdering a teenager they had accused of using witchcraft.

Eric Bikubi, 28, and Magalie Bamu, aged 29, from Newham, east London, had denied killing Bamu's 15-year-old brother Kristy.

Kristy drowned in a bath on Christmas Day in 2010, during torture to produce exorcism, an Old Bailey jury heard.

Bikubi had admitted manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility, but the prosecution rejected his plea.

The pair, who are both originally from the Democratic Republic of Congo, were remanded in custody and are due to be sentenced on Monday.

'No comfort'
The family of the murdered teenager said they had "forgiven" his killers.

A family statement, read out in court by prosecutor Brian Altman QC, said: "We will never forget, but to put our lives back into sync we must forgive.

"We take no comfort in the verdicts - we have been robbed of a beloved son, a daughter, a son-in-law.


Magalie Bamu "stoked the fire" of Bikubi's violence, the court heard
"Kristy died in unimaginable circumstances at the hands of people who he loved and trusted. People who we all loved and trusted."

Judge David Paget, who was presiding over his last trial before retiring, told the jury of seven women and five men the case was so "harrowing" he was exempting them from jury service for the rest of their lives.

'Begged to die'
"It is a case we will all remember," he told them. "Court staff will speak to you and offer help to you."

During the trial, jurors heard Kristy was in such pain after three days of attacks by Bikubi and Bamu, who used knives, sticks, metal bars and a hammer and chisel, that he "begged to die", before slipping under the water.

Kristy had been killed while he and his siblings were visiting Bikubi and Bamu for Christmas, the court was told.

During the stay, Bikubi turned on them, accusing them of bringing "kindoki" - or witchcraft - into his home.

He then beat all three of them and forced other children to join in with the attacks, the jury heard.


Bikubi argued he was mentally ill, but the prosecution rejected his plea
But it was Kristy who became the focus of the defendant's attention, the prosecution said.

Bamu and football coach Bikubi believed he had cast spells on another child in the family, the Old Bailey heard.

Kristy had refused to admit to sorcery and witchcraft and his punishments, in a "deliverance" ceremony, became more horrendous until he admitted to being a sorcerer.

The defence had argued Bikubi was mentally ill when he carried out the killing, with a scan of his brain showing lesions which "probably contributed to an abnormal mental state".

'Unimaginable violence'
However, the prosecution had rejected this as a plea to reduce the charge against him.

During her defence, Magalie Bamu told the jury Bikubi had forced her to join in the attack on the children.

But the court heard there was ample evidence to show she hit Kristy and "stoked the fire of violence" Bikubi had embarked on in the flat.

Outside court, chief crown prosecutor Jenny Hopkins said Bikubi "knew exactly what he was doing".


Jenny Hopkins of the Crown Prosecution Service, said Bikubi "inflicted violence on an unimaginable scale"
"His actions were nothing short of torture and he inflicted on the victims violence on an unimaginable scale," she said.

"It has also been proven that his accomplice - Magalie Bamu - acted of her own accord.

"She willingly subjected her 15-year-old brother to extreme violence."

Met Det Supt Terry Sharpe said: "Child abuse in any form, including that based on a belief in witchcraft or spirit possession, is a horrific crime which is condemned by people of all cultures, communities and faith, and is never acceptable in any circumstances."

Kristy's family said they hoped comfort could be drawn from his death through raising awareness "of the plight of children accused of witchcraft or spirit possession and promote the need to safeguard children's rights".
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PostPosted: 07-02-2013 13:57    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Woman burned alive for 'sorcery' in Papua New Guinea
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-21363894

A woman has been tortured and burned alive in Papua New Guinea after being accused of using sorcery to kill a young boy, local media report.

The woman, a mother aged 20 named as Kepari Leniata, was stripped, tied up and doused in petrol by the boy's relatives in Mount Hagen in the Western Highlands, said the National newspaper.

She was then thrown onto a fire in front of hundreds of people.

Police and firefighters were unable to intervene, the paper said.

The Post Courier newspaper said they had been outnumbered by the crowd and chased away. Both newspapers published graphic photos of the incident on their front pages.

Provincial police commander Supt Kaiglo Ambane told the National that police were treating the case as murder and would arrest those responsible.

In parts of the Pacific nation deaths and mysterious illnesses are sometimes blamed on suspected sorcerers. Several reports have emerged in recent years of accused people, usually women, being killed.

In 2009, after a string of such killings, the chairman of PNG's Constitutional Review and Law Reform Commission said defendants were using accusations of witchcraft as an excuse to kill people, and called for tougher legislation to tackle the issue.

Local Christian bishop David Piso told the National that sorcery-related killings were a growing problem, and urged the government "to come up with a law to stop such practice".

The US embassy in the capital, Port Moresby, condemned the killing as a "brutal murder", the AFP news agency reports, and evidence of "pervasive gender-based violence" in Papua New Guinea.

"There is no possible justification for this sort of violence. We hope that appropriate resources are devoted to identifying, prosecuting, and punishing those responsible for Ms Leniata's murder."
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PostPosted: 10-02-2013 02:47    Post subject: Reply with quote

Apparently this is far from an isolated incident:

Quote:
Mr Kulunga said while those involved in the killing would be arrested and brought to justice the potential for future sorcery related killings still remained.
“Churches, NGOs and relevant government departments need to take some responsibility in addressing this issue so that we end, if not minimise, further sorcery related killings,” he said, adding that perhaps one way is to appoint special courts to deal with sorcery related cases.
Mr Kulunga also suggested education and the raising of awareness in provinces where such killings are widespread to deal with the issue.


http://www.postcourier.com.pg/20130208/news.htm
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PostPosted: 08-04-2013 20:10    Post subject: Reply with quote

And again.

Quote:
Two women beheaded in Papua New Guinea over witchcraft claims
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/australasia/two-women-beheaded-in-papua-new-guinea-over-witchcraft-claims-8564121.html
CHARLIE COOPER MONDAY 08 APRIL 2013

Two elderly women have been beheaded in front of a crowd of onlookers in Papua New Guinea in the latest of a spate of brutal attacks in the country against people accused of witchcraft.

Police at the scene were outnumbered by an angry mob and were forced to stand by as the women were murdered in a remote village, the Post-Courier newspaper reported.

Bougainville police inspector Herman Birengka said his men had been “helpless”.

It is understood the two women had been suspected of causing the death of a local teacher through sorcery.

“The two women were rounded up and taken to Lopele village after they were suspected of practising sorcery and blamed for the death of a former teacher, who was from Lopele village,” Mr Birengka said.

The newspaper reported that the two women had been tortured for three days before the murders, suffering knife and axe wounds. Police were sent to the remote village to act as mediators but were held back by the mob, who were reportedly armed with firearms, knives and axes.

The killings come days after six women accused of sorcery were reportedly tortured with hot irons in the country's Southern Highlands and last month a woman was burned to death by a mob, leading Amnesty International to call for more action to prevent violence associated with accusations of witchcraft in the country.

The killings have led 1,000 people to march through the streets of Buka, in Bougainville Province, in protest against sorcery-related killings, Radio Australia reported.

Local human rights leader Helen Makena, chairman of the North Bougainville Human Rights Committee, told Radio Australia that the feeling at the rally was “sadness” but that women and men “spoke out and condemned the barbabaric killing”.

Amnesty has urged Papua New Guinea's government to address the violence in the Pacific nation, where many still believe in sorcery.
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PostPosted: 13-04-2013 21:41    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Papua New Guinea prime minister to repeal sorcery law
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-22123237

Peter O'Neill says he cannot guarantee legislation would be introduced this parliamentary session

The prime minister of Papua New Guinea has vowed to revoke a controversial sorcery law after a string of attacks on people, reports say.

Peter O'Neill made the statement days after a woman was beheaded in south Bougainville.

She was accused of practising sorcery that caused the death of a teacher, local media said.

In parts of the Pacific nation deaths and mysterious illnesses are sometimes blamed on suspected sorcerers.

'Barbaric'
Several reports have emerged in recent years of accused people, usually women, being killed.

The country's Sorcery Act 1971 criminalises the practice of sorcery.

But critics say it gives the notion legitimacy and has led to an increase in false accusations.

The United Nations has called on the PNG government to strengthen legislation on the issue.


"We're starting to work at it," Mr O'Neill was quoted as saying by Australia's ABC News.

"We have quite a lot of issues on the table, so please give us a chance to work on it.

"Hopefully this session of parliament, but I cannot guarantee it. Realistically, a few sessions away, we will be able to put an act to parliament to stop this nonsense about witchcraft and all the other sorceries that are really barbaric in itself."

In the most recent case, a woman was reportedly decapitated by a mob who accused her of using witchcraft to kill a colleague in Lopele village.

Police said villagers armed with weapons outnumbered police and looted property.

The acting assistant police commissioner for south Bougainville, Paul Kamuai, told ABC News that local forces were unable to stop the violence.

A 20-year-old woman was burned alive in February after she was accused of sorcery.

In 2009, after a string of such killings, the chairman of Papua New Guinea's Constitutional Review and Law Reform Commission said defendants were using accusations of witchcraft as an excuse to kill people, and called for tougher legislation to tackle the issue.
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PostPosted: 15-04-2013 12:07    Post subject: Reply with quote

More bizarre PNG news.

Quote:
Father tries to eat his baby in sorcery ritual
http://www.ndtv.com/article/world/father-tries-to-eat-his-baby-in-sorcery-ritual-83637
Press Trust of India | Updated: February 05, 2011 19:41 IST

Sydney: A drug-crazed father in Papua New Guinea has been accused of trying to eat his newborn baby boy in a grisly witchcraft ceremony, a report said today.

Local residents awoke to the baby's screams and chased the man to the police station, where he was detained, Australia's AAP news agency said, quoting police. The baby died of his injuries.

"It is a very disturbing incident," said Sergeant Demas Tapea, police commander in the Western Province town of Tabulil.

"The community is upset, angry but there is also a lot of fear and anxiety because there is a belief in sorcery or witchcraft."

Tapea said the suspect was known to police and had a history of drug problems.

"Locals are saying the man was carrying out a sorcery ritual, or initiation, to become part of some sort of special society," he said.

"The suspect has a long history of drug abuse and we are not surprised something like this has happened. A few years ago, he went crazy in what we believe was due to the effects of drugs."

Belief in witchcraft and sorcery remains strong in the impoverished South Pacific nation, where a spate of murders has been linked to rituals.
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PostPosted: 26-04-2013 02:41    Post subject: Reply with quote

An update on the truly sorry state of affairs in PNG:

Quote:
Witch-hunt

Witch burning, torture and sorcery are still frighteningly common in Papua New Guinea, and the victims are invariably women, writes Tim Elliott.


Witch-hunts went out of style in Europe some time in the 1700s. But in PNG, where 80 per cent of the population still lives in the bush and even city folk believe in black magic, such violence is increasingly common. According to PNG's Constitutional and Law Reform Commission, the Highlands province of Simbu alone experiences 150 attacks a year.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/world/witchhunt-20130415-2huha.html#ixzz2RX84KQHG
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PostPosted: 30-04-2013 12:24    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Ghanaians ban 'spirit child' killing
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-22335634

These children were accused of being possessed by evil spirits

Local leaders in northern Ghana have announced the abolition of the ritual killing of babies born with physical disabilities, who were believed to have been possessed by evil spirits.

"Spirit children" were thought to have been a sign of impending misfortune and given a poisonous drink to kill them.

One campaigner told the BBC that improved healthcare and education meant such beliefs were becoming less common.

Activist Raymond Ayine welcomed the ban, which covers seven towns.

But he said he could not guarantee that the practice had been eradicated from the whole country.

The BBC's Vera Kwakofi says the Kasena-Nankana region, where the ban has been announced, is the part of Ghana where such beliefs are most widespread.

Sometimes, babies born at the same time as a family misfortune were also accused of being "spirit children" and killed.

The "concoction men" who used to give the children the poisonous drink have been given new roles; they will now work with disabled children to promote their rights.

'Barbaric practice'

Investigative journalist Anas Aremeyaw Anas told the BBC's Focus on Africa programme that he took a plastic doll to a soothsayer, saying it was a child with eating problems and physical disabilities.

"He consulted the oracles, jumped up and down and after this said that the oracles confirmed that the child was an evil child and that the child needed to be killed immediately, and that the child had already killed two members of my family," he said.

Local chief Naba Henry Abawine Amenga-Etigo said that anyone caught trying to harm children from now on would be handed over to the police.

Mr Ayine, from the campaign group Afrikids, said he was "saddened that in today's era, a child could lose its life because of such a barbaric practice".

He noted that in rural areas where such beliefs are more common, women often give birth without ever seeing a midwife, let alone having a pre-natal scan. As a result, childbirth leads to complications more often than elsewhere, he said.

He also said that even before the official ban, there had been no recorded case of the killing of "spirit children" in the area for the past three years.

He put this down to awareness campaigns, as well as improved access to education that meant more people understood that physical disabilities had a medical explanation.

In other parts of northern Ghana, elderly women accused of being witches are sometimes forced to leave their homes and live in "witch camps".
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PostPosted: 29-05-2013 16:14    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
PNG repeals sorcery law and expands death penalty
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-22698668

Prime Minster Peter O'Neill pledged to toughen laws in May, after several high-profile crimes

Papua New Guinea has repealed its controversial Sorcery Act but has expanded its use of the death penalty.

Under legislation passed in parliament on Tuesday, killings linked to allegations of witchcraft will now be treated as murder.

The death penalty will be applied to more crimes, including rape, and more methods of execution have been approved.

Amnesty International condemned the move to toughen penalties.

"Papua New Guinea has taken one step forward in protecting women from violence by repealing the Sorcery Act, but several giant steps back by moving closer to executions," Amnesty's deputy director for the Asia-Pacific Isabelle Arradon said in a statement.

'State-sanctioned violence'
In parts of Papua New Guinea, deaths and mysterious illnesses are sometimes blamed on suspected sorcerers, usually women. But officials say accusations of witchcraft are used to justify violence.

The repeal of the 1971 Sorcery Act, which acknowledged the accusation of sorcery as a plausible defence in murder cases, came after a series of brutal public killings.

In February, a 20-year-old mother accused of sorcery was burned alive in a village market. Two months later, a woman accused of black magic was beheaded.

Sorcery-related killings will now be treated as murder and the death penalty will be applicable, local media said.

Ms Arradon called the repeal of the act "long overdue" but accused the government of "attempting to end one of form of violence by perpetrating state-sanctioned violence".

Lawmakers have also approved legislation allowing the death penalty to be applied to aggravated rape - gang-rape, the use of a weapon, or rape of a child - and armed robbery, PNG's The National reported.

Parliament approved several methods for applying the death penalty, the Post Courier reported, including hanging, lethal injection, firing squad and electrocution.

Penalties for kidnapping, theft and white-collar crime were also toughened, with longer jail terms prescribed.

The laws were tough but reflected crime levels and community demands, The National quoted Justice and Attorney General Kerenga Kua as saying.

Papua New Guinea has not carried out an execution since 1954, despite parliament's decision to reintroduce the death penalty for murder in 1991. At least 10 people are currently on death row, Amnesty said.

PNG Prime Minister Peter O'Neil announced plans to begin implementing the death penalty and to increase prison sentences for violent crimes last month, saying "draconian" measures were needed.

His move followed a number of high-profile crimes in the Pacific nation, including the gang-rape of a US academic in April.
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PostPosted: 26-08-2013 05:35    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Saudi Arabia's War on Witchcraft
A special unit of the religious police pursues magical crime aggressively, and the convicted face death sentences.


The sorceress was naked.

The sight of her bare flesh startled the prudish officers of Saudi Arabia's infamous religious police, the Committee for the Promotion of Virtue and the Prevention of Vice (CPVPV), which had barged into her room in what was supposed to be a routine raid of a magical hideout in the western desert city of Madinah's Al-Seeh neighborhood. They paused in shock, and to let her dress.

The woman -- still unclothed -- managed to slip out of the window of her apartment and flee. According to the 2006 account of the Saudi Okaz newspaper, which has been described as the Arabic equivalent of the New York Post, she "flew like a bird." A frantic pursuit ensued. The unit found their suspect after she had fallen through the unsturdy roof of an adjacent house and onto the ground next to a bed of dozing children.

They covered her body, arrested her, and claimed to uncover key evidence indicating that witchcraft had indeed been practiced, including incense, talismans, and videos about magic. In the Al Arabiya report, a senior Islamic cleric lamented that the incident had occurred in a city of such sacred history. The prophet Muhammad is buried there, and it is considered the second most holy location in Islam, second to Mecca. The cleric didn't doubt the details of the incident. "Some magicians may ride a broom and fly in the air with the help of the jinn [supernatural beings]," he said.

The fate of this sorceress is not readily apparent, but her plight is common. Judging from the punishments of others accused of practicing witchcraft in Saudi Arabia before and since, the consequences were almost certainly severe.

In 2007, Egyptian pharmacist Mustafa Ibrahim was beheaded in Riyadh after his conviction on charges of "practicing magic and sorcery as well as adultery and desecration of the Holy Quran." The charges of "magic and sorcery" are not euphemisms for some other kind of egregious crime he committed; they alone were enough to qualify him for a death sentence. He first came to the attention of the religious authorities when members of a mosque in the northern town of Arar voiced concerns over the placement of the holy book in the restroom. After being accused of disrupting a man's marriage through spellwork, and the discovery of "books on black magic, a candle with an incantation 'to summon devils,' and 'foul-smelling herbs,'" the case -- and eventually his life -- were swallowed by the black hole of the discretionary Saudi court system.


More at the link: http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2013/08/saudi-arabias-war-on-witchcraft/278701/
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PostPosted: 26-08-2013 06:57    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now, Now, the Saudi princes are our friends, no matter how vile, vicious and mediaeval their regime might appear to be to us ordinary folks in the West. They own half of London and are in tight with our rulers, the bank managers.
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PostPosted: 17-09-2013 12:40    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Memorial unveiled for Kinross witchcraft victims
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-tayside-central-20085045

Witches maze

The Witches Maze is a memorial to the 11 people from Crook of Devon executed for being 'witches' in 1662

A memorial to 11 people executed for witchcraft in Kinross has been unveiled at the home of those who condemned them.

The Witches Maze at Tullibole Castle commemorates the victims of the Crook of Devon witch trials in 1662.

The castle was once home to William Halliday and his son John who held court over the 'covens' in the village.

Lord Moncrieff, who now owns Tullibole, commissioned the maze as there is no memorial in Crook of Devon.

In 1662 the court sat five times and resulted in the death of 11 suspected witches.

Those who survived the trials were taken to a small mound near the current village hall and strangled by the common hangman and their bodies thrown on a fire.

Victims remembered
Lord Moncreiff commenced on the maze in 2003. The finished memorial is a circle 33m (100ft) wide and consists of 2,000 beach trees.

At the centre of the maze is a one and a half ton elaborate sandstone pillar, with the names of the victims etched on it.

The five sided pillar was created by Gillian Forbes, a stone carver from Path of Condie.

Lord Moncreiff said: "I dislike public art that has nothing to say and commissioned Gillian because I believe she understands the sensitivity of the task.

"It is my hope that the memorial will also question our understanding of the past and issues of blame and judgement in modern day society."
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PostPosted: 22-01-2014 21:25    Post subject: Reply with quote

This article raises more question than answers for me...

Quote:
Zimbabwe: Witch-Hunter's Antics Cause Confusion, Disbelief At Chichera

THE community at Chichera farm near Old Marlborough suburb has been left in a state of confusion, awe and disbelief following the invasion of the area by a self-proclaimed witch-hunter, who claims to be unearthing tools used for sorcery.

The self-proclaimed witch-hunter, Morius Mbofana, popularly known as Sekuru Maguranyanga has been causing stir in the area for the past two weeks where he is claiming to be carrying out witch-hunting and cleansing exercises at the invitation of locals.

Standardcommunity last week attended a meeting where a number of farm dwellers who were allegedly "caught" with tools of magic confessed and asked for forgiveness from the community.

"I was caught with a snake which was in a bag in my bed room. The snake belongs to me," said an elderly man identified only as Matibhiri.

Said another man who requested anonymity: "I was keeping a charm which I was using to lure women and Sekuru fished it out of my pants during the cleansing ceremony."

A young woman who was standing next to her husband said Sekuru Maguranyanga discovered a mouse which the witch-hunter argued was sucking blood from her three months old son.

"I do not know how that thing ended up in my house but Sekuru said it belongs to me. I am really confused," she said.

John Ojesi, who is the farm workers' leader, said they indeed invited the witch-hunter upon the request of the community.

"I can confirm that Sekuru Maguranyanga is a genuine traditional healer. We invited him after vetting his papers and made sure that he is a true member of Zinatha. He is doing wonders, and the whole community is happy with what he is doing," he said.

He however said a few villagers had their misgivings over the conduct of the witch-hunter.

"We have had a few incidences where some members of the community have said they do not want the witch-hunter to visit them because of their religion, but generally things are taking shape. There is no one who has been forced to take part in Sekuru Maguranyanga's dealings," he said.

The witch-hunter sensationally "unearthed" magic which he claimed was being used by some local men to be intimate with women without their knowledge (mubobobo).


http://allafrica.com/stories/201401161266.html
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PostPosted: 09-05-2014 14:02    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
#BBCtrending: Did voodoo rumours on Facebook lead to a murder?

A violent murder in a Brazilian beach town shows the danger of rumours on social media.

As in communities across the world, people in Guaruja, near Sao Paulo, often get their news fix from local Facebook pages rather than newspapers. Guaruja Alerta is one of the most popular, with more than 50,000 likes. But a series of posts on the page has now been blamed for a terrible murder.

On Saturday, Fabiane Maria de Jesus, a 33-year-old mother of two, was attacked by a mob using stones and heavy sticks and then - shockingly - lynched in broad daylight. This gruesome attack was filmed by people on their phones and posted online. De Jesus died from her injuries on Monday, and her lawyers allege that the Guaruja Alerta Facebook page was responsible for her killing.

Why do they blame the Facebook page? For weeks, rumours had been circulating in the town about a woman kidnapping local children to perform voodoo rituals on them. The stories were posted on the Facebook page, despite the fact that the people running the page were told by police that the rumours weren't true. The rumours alleged the kidnapper was always carrying a Bible. De Jesus was carrying a Bible on the day she was attacked, and was seen giving a banana to a child. "We don't think the owner of the Facebook page is a murderer," De Jesus' lawyer, Airton Sinto, told BBC Trending. "We think he is an irresponsible person who should take responsibility for what he has done."

The administrators of the Facebook page say they did post the police's statement - that there were no reported kidnappings of any children - on their Facebook page. But they admit they did not take down their earlier posts and continued discussing the rumours. Their lawyers told BBC Trending that those who blame the Facebook site "are looking for the wrong people" - and that blame lies only with the mob who attacked her.

Local police chief Ricardo Lara told BBC Trending that it's too early to be sure whether De Jesus' murder was linked to the false stories of a "voodoo kidnapper", but a man arrested for the crime has admitted he had heard the rumours. At the moment, there is no law in Brazil that would criminalise spreading rumours on social media. The events in Guaraja might change that though, as there is now a national debate in Brazil on the issue.
http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-trending-27311519
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