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Rare Burials & Exhumations

 
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 12-09-2005 14:44    Post subject: Rare Burials & Exhumations Reply with quote

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Rare burial from the Iron Age is found on Scottish island


An Iron Age skeleton has been found after an archaeological excavation on an island off the west coast of Scotland. The burial, thought to be of a young female, is the first one discovered on the Isle of Skye. Excavations made in the High Pasture Cave near Kilbride unearthed animal bones (radiocarbon-dated to 390 and 160 BC) and artefacts last year. The burial was found recently when the research team re-opened the sealed cave, close to stone-built structures on the surface. Archaeologist Martin Wildgoose said: “We now know that at some stage during the Iron Age this former entrance was deliberately sealed to the outside world and the hollow above the entrance filled with an intricate sequence of archaeological deposits in excess of 4 metres in depth.” The grave is stone-lined and the body was covered with soil and larger stones and an unusual ring-headed bone pin was found just above the skull. George Kozikowski, a member of the project team, stated: “The discovery of the human remains at the High Pasture’s site is a very important find and will provide a unique opportunity to study a wide range of aspects of Iron Age life and death in the region.” Isotope analysis of the bones may provide evidence of the person’s diet and where they originated from. Patrick Ashmore, Head of Archaeology with Historic Scotland, said: “Given how rare burials of this period are, it is very exciting to be able to do research into origins and diet.” Further details of the High Pasture Cave Project excavations are available at www.high-pasture-cave.org and open days at the site will be run from October 5th to 12th.

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PostPosted: 26-09-2005 14:01    Post subject: Another Rare Burial Reply with quote

Quote:
Archaeologists Discover Infants' Remains


Archaeologists have uncovered the remains of two newborns dating back 27,000 years while excavating a hillside in northern Austria, the scientist in charge of the project said Monday.

The find made last week near the Danube River city of Krems is important because the newborns were buried beneath mammoth bones and with a string of 31 beads — suggesting that the internment involved some sort of ritual, said Christine Neugebauer-Maresch, the project's leader at the Austrian Academy of Sciences.

"They could be twins," she said. "They have the same (length) limbs and were buried together."

The burial — one of the oldest in the region — is also significant in that the children were not simply disposed of after their deaths, Neugebauer-Maresch said. The burial suggests "they were members of society," she said.

Archaeologists are combing the area to see if the infants' mother is nearby, as giving birth to twins in that era would have been extremely difficult and potentially fatal.

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PostPosted: 29-09-2005 13:39    Post subject: Iron Age Woman's Skeleton Found in Denmark Reply with quote

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Iron Age Woman's Skeleton Found in Denmark

Wed Sep 28, 8:44 PM ET



Danish archeologists said Wednesday they found the well-preserved skeletal remains of an Iron Age woman while excavating an ancient grave site in a suburb of Copenhagen.

The woman, who was between 20 and 40 when she died, probably lived around the year A.D. 400, said Tom Giersing of the Kroppedal Museum in Taastrup.

"What we find interesting is her bones are well-preserved and she had jewelry — glass pearls and a metal chain — which could indicate that she was wealthy," said Giersing, who headed the excavation.

Denmark's best known Iron Age findings are the well-preserved bog bodies of the so-called Tollund man and Grauballe man, named after the two villages where they found. The Iron Age in Denmark lasted from about 500 B.C. to 750 A.D.

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edited by TheQuixote: hyperlink created to stop page break
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PostPosted: 09-02-2006 13:06    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Ancient ashes found buried in Rome

Archeologists have reportedly found the ashes of an ancient chief or priest who lived three centuries before the legendary founding of Rome.

The remains, dating to about 1,000 B.C., were discovered last month in a funerary urn at the bottom of a deep pit, along with several bowls and jars -- all encased in a hutlike box near the center of modern Rome, National Geographic News reported.

A team of archaeologists, led by Alessandro Delfino of Rome's Department of Cultural Heritage, discovered the prehistoric tomb while excavating the floor of Caesar's Forum, the remains of a square built by Julius Caesar around 46 B.C.

"We knew there should be very ancient tombs (at the site)," Delfino told NGN. "We had previously found two graves in the same site. They were small, less than a meter (about 40 inches) deep."

The newly found pit is six feet deep and four feet wide.

Officials said the prehistoric tribes probably placed the ashes of the low-ranking dead in surface buildings and buried only ashes of the notables.

http://www.physorg.com/printnews.php?newsid=10692
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PostPosted: 13-07-2006 12:17    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Excavation unearths burial site

The burial site is believed to date back to the 6th Century
Archaeologists believe they may have discovered one of the oldest churches in Scotland during an excavation in Aberdeen.
They are awaiting test results which will confirm whether they have uncovered a religious burial site dating back to the 6th Century.

The find was made during Scotland's biggest archaeological dig in the east kirk of St Nicholas Church.

So far 300 skeletons have been unearthed, far more than expected.

The excavation is part of a £5m renovation of the site.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/5174896.stm
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PostPosted: 07-02-2007 16:03    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Lessons From The Bogs

The head of Tollund Man, who died (by hanging) some 2,000 years ago, topped one of the best-preserved bodies ever pulled from a European bog.
by Kathleen Maclay

Berkeley CA (SPX) Feb 07, 2007
Karin Sanders, associate professor and chair of the Scandinavian department, was just an infant when two well-preserved bodies from the Iron Age surfaced in peat bogs in her native Denmark, and a teen when The Bog People, P.V. Glob's scientific-detective story about the discoveries, became a European best-seller.
Her fascination with the likes of Tollund Man (one of the most famous of all "bog bodies," found in 1950) led her to research their ongoing displays in museums around the world. She also developed an interest in various literary and artistic depictions of the mysterious mummified or skeletal human remains that have been discovered in bogs throughout northwestern Europe since the 18th century.

When bog bodies were first found, their remarkable preservation led many to assume that they had died recently, likely murdered. The acid- and oxygen-free peat wetlands into which the bodies were deposited preserved their skin and internal organs (though rarely the skeleton), and the acidity and cold temperatures of the bogs deeply tanned the skin, often turning the bodies a curious orange or red.

What is clear from the majority of the approximately 1,000 bog people found so far, Sanders says, is that they met a violent end before ending up in the bogs. Many were stabbed, strangled, hanged, or otherwise brutally treated.

One ancient historian wrote about an ancient Norse practice of tossing into the bogs the bodies of those "who defiled themselves" and broke customs of their time. Others have theorized that the bog people were probably criminals, or perhaps the chosen victims for sacrificial rituals. The Nazis, Sanders notes, claimed most bog people were homosexuals and that their deaths were to be seen as a just end warranted by their unnatural lifestyles.

Literature and art developed around the bog people as early as the 1830s, says Sanders, and continues today. Most artists have taken a nostalgic view of the past, while others have chosen to depict the bodies as abject and grotesque, sometimes awash in blood-red paint. Still others have imaginatively arrayed bog bodies in contemporary settings.

Bog As Memory Bank
Writers have taken inspiration from bog bodies as well. The Nobel Prize-winning poet Seamus Heaney, says Sanders, "projected onto the bog bodies from Denmark and other nations the brutality of human violence and national sacrifices in Ireland." Sanders at one point planned to write an article about Heaney's bog-body references, fascinated by "how the bog serves as a memory bank" for him.

But in the course of her research she uncovered such a wealth of information that she now is finishing a lengthy book examining how what she calls "human time capsules" have been depicted in poetry and literature by others, including Belgium's Hugo Claus (of the post-World War II avant-garde Cobra movement) and the American modernist William Carlos Williams, among others.

This semester, Sanders is teaching Word and Image, a course that will include reading both the history of bog bodies and some of physicist Stephen Hawking's A Briefer History of Time. (The book is being provided free to freshmen in the College of Letters and Science in advance of a March 13 campus presentation by Hawking, and several spring courses related to the book are on offer in addition to Sanders'.) Sanders sees a link between the Hawking book and how the well-preserved bog bodies seem to alter the sense of time.

Beyond that, Sanders thinks that now is an opportune moment to consider how bog people have been interpreted since their discovery more than 200 years ago. Such study can shed light on what she calls the "elastic boundary" between the past and present, the evolution of ethics and aesthetics, and issues of race, gender, national identity, political ideology, facial reconstruction, and pop culture . . . and what it means to be human - whether alive or dead.

These are critically important topics, says Sanders, "at a time when nations are trying to think over, sometimes in scary ways, what it means to belong to a certain nation or culture."

http://www.terradaily.com/reports/Lessons_From_The_Bogs_999.html
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ginoideOffline
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PostPosted: 07-02-2007 17:18    Post subject: Reply with quote

sorry i can't give you a link for this

ARCHAEOLOGISTS FIND PREHISTORIC ROMEO AND JULIET LOCKED IN

eternal embrace

ROME (AP) _ It could be humanity's oldest story of doomed

love.

Archaeologists have unearthed two skeletons from the

Neolithic period locked in a tender embrace and buried

outside Mantua, just 40 kilometers (25 miles) south of

Verona, the romantic city where Shakespeare set the

star-crossed tale of Romeo and Juliet.

Buried between 5,000 to 6,000 years ago, the prehistoric

lovers are believed to have been a man and a woman and are

thought to have died young, as their teeth were found

intact, said Elena Menotti, the archaeologist who led the

dig.

«As far as we know, it's unique,» Menotti told The

Associated Press by telephone from Milan. «Double burials

from the Neolithic are unheard of, and these are even

hugging.»

The burial site was located Monday during construction

work for a factory building in the outskirts of Mantua.

Alongside the couple, archaeologists found flint tools,

including arrowheads and a knife, Menotti said.

Experts will now study the artifacts and the skeletons to

determine the burial sitès age and how old the two were

when they died, she said.
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 07-02-2007 17:21    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can find it here:

http://www.physorg.com/news90067666.html

http://www.physorg.com/newman/gfx/news/prehistoricr.jpg



edited by TheQuixote: removed hotlink to image
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ginoideOffline
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PostPosted: 07-02-2007 21:32    Post subject: Reply with quote

thanky you! I had been looking for a picture too but couldn't find any.
it may turn out to be something completely different, but it looks sweet, they look like a sleeping-n-smooching couple
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PostPosted: 07-02-2007 21:50    Post subject: Reply with quote

Perhaps the undertaker was in a funny mood?
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PostPosted: 19-05-2010 15:07    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Derbyshire Iron Age bones were of pregnant woman
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/derbyshire/8691348.stm

Peak District dig site
The remains were found during the dig at Monsal Dale in the Peak District

Tests carried out on a skeleton discovered at an archaeological dig in Derbyshire have found it was that of a pregnant woman.

Experts said they were surprised by the female find because the site, near Monsal Dale in the Peak District, had been believed to be a military scene.

Now, extra lottery funding means there can be a second dig at the Fin Cop hill fort site to find out more.

Archaeologists unearthed the Iron Age skeleton last August.

During the excavation, the woman was uncovered among the jumbled stone of a collapsed rampart.


When you get back to the lab, throw the scientific techniques and analysis at them, that's when you start to get the story out
Jim Brightman, project manager

The main focus of the dig was to find how the ramparts of the hill fort were built and when they were erected and archaeologists described the skeleton find as "unexpected".

Experts said it was evident the woman had been thrown into the ditch as the stone wall of the hill fort was being pushed in.

Specialist analysis of the bones revealed the woman to have been about 21 to 30 years of age when she died between 300 and 200 BC.

The Longstone Local History Group has now been awarded a grant of nearly £50,000 to continue to research the area with the help of Archaeological Research Services Ltd.

One of the project managers, Jim Brightman, said: "Quite a lot of very important finds cannot look like much on site.

"But when you get back to the lab, throw the scientific techniques and analysis at them, that's when you start to get the story out.

"The bones are a great example of that, we found out so much more by analysing them."

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PostPosted: 09-03-2012 00:41    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Worsley Man: Hospital scanner probes Iron Age bog death
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-manchester-17300084

Bryan Sitch, curator of archaeology at the museum, said it now appeared the man had been beaten about the head, garrotted and then beheaded

Related Stories

Cheshire's history in 10 objects
Iron Age man leaves museum 'home'

The head of an Iron Age man who died almost 2,000 years ago has been scanned in a Manchester hospital to shed light on how he died.

Worsley Man is thought to have lived around 100 AD when Romans occupied much of Britain.

Since its discovery in a Salford peat bog in 1958, the head has been kept at Manchester Museum on Oxford Road.

The scans at the Manchester Children's Hospital have now revealed more details about his violent death.

Doctors said CAT scan tests revealed damage to the remains of his neck, almost certainly caused by a ligature.

Continue reading the main story

Start Quote

This really was an extraordinary level of violence.”

Bryan Sitch,
Manchester Museum
Speculation about the death of the man, thought to be in his 20s or 30s, has previously included robbery or human sacrifice.

'2,000-year-old patient'
Bryan Sitch, curator of archaeology at Manchester Museum, said it now appeared the man was bludgeoned over the head, garrotted then beheaded.

He said: "The radiology staff at the hospital were quite excited to have a 2,000-year-old patient.

"This really was an extraordinary level of violence, it could be that there was some sort of ritual behind this."

The death of Worsley Man shares some similarities with another Iron Age body found in a Cheshire peat bog in 1984.

Tests on Lindow Man, who lived around 150 years earlier, suggest he had also been garrotted, as well as having his throat slit.
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PostPosted: 29-03-2012 01:16    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another find in High Pasture cave.

Quote:
Skye cave find western Europe's 'earliest string instrument'
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-17537147

The notched wood is believed to be the bridge of an ancient lyre

Related Stories

Explorers uncover Applecross cave
Ancient sea cave 'still occupied'

Archaeologists believe they have uncovered the remains of the earliest stringed instrument to be found so far in western Europe.

The small burnt and broken piece of carved piece of wood was found during an excavation in a cave on Skye.

Archaeologists said it was likely to be part of the bridge of a lyre dating to more than 2,300 years ago.

Music archaeologist Dr Graeme Lawson said the discovery marked a "step change" in music history.

The Cambridge-based expert said: "It pushes the history of complex music back more than a thousand years, into our darkest pre-history.

"And not only the history of music but more specifically of song and poetry, because that's what such instruments were very often used for.

"The earliest known lyres date from about 5,000 years ago, in what is now Iraq, and these were already complicated and finely-made structures.

"But here in Europe even Roman traces proved hard to locate. Pictures, maybe, but no actual remains."

The remains, which were unveiled in Edinburgh, were found in High Pasture Cave, where Bronze and Iron Age finds have been made previously.

Cultural historian Dr Purser said: "What, for me, is so exciting about this find is that it confirms the continuity of a love of music amongst the Western Celts.


Archaeologists said the find marked a "step change" in music history
"Stringed instruments, being usually made of wood, rarely survive in the archaeological record, but they are referred to in the very earliest literature, and, in various forms, were to feature on many stone carvings in Scotland and Ireland, and to become emblematic in both countries."

Steven Birch, an archaeologist involved in the excavation, said deeper sections of the cave were reached using a flight of stone steps.

He said: "Descending the steep and narrow steps, the transition from light to dark transports you out of one world into a completely different realm, where the human senses are accentuated.

"Within the cave, sound forms a major component of this transformation, the noise of the underground stream in particular producing a calming environment."

Dr Fraser Hunter, principal curator of Iron Age and Roman Collections at National Museums Scotland, said the fragment of musical instrument put "sound into the silent past".

Culture and External Affairs Secretary Fiona Hyslop added: "This is an incredible find and it clearly demonstrates how our ancestors were using music and ritual in their lives.

"The evidence shows that Skye was a gathering place over generations and that it obviously had an important role to play in the celebration and ritual of life more than 2,000 years ago."

AOC Archaeology in Edinburgh worked on conserving the bridge.

It was among several artefacts recovered from the cave in a project supported Highland Council, Historic Scotland and National Museums of Scotland.
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PostPosted: 17-04-2013 23:10    Post subject: Reply with quote

Will they track down the killer?

Quote:
600-year-old skeleton mystery at Fermanagh crannog site
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-22142762

The woman was buried in an "irregular" way, archaeologists say

Related Stories

Fermanagh crannog's treasure trove
Ancient site now a 'no-go zone'

Mystery surrounds a 600-year-old skeleton found at the site of an archaeological dig in County Fermanagh.

The crannog - a man made island settlement - is situated on a site where the new A32 Cherrymount link road in Enniskillen will be built.

The woman, who was in her late teens when she died, was not buried in either a recognised graveyard or in traditional manner.

This has led archaeologists to consider the possibility of foul play.

Excavation director Dr Nora Bermingham dated the teenager's death to around the 15th or 16th centuries.

"The skeleton of a young woman, probably around 18 or 19 with very bad teeth, was found in the upper layers of the crannog," she said.

Continue reading the main story

Start Quote

It's not uncommon for people who have either committed crimes or people who have been murdered or whatnot to have been buried in this fashion”

Dr Nora Bermingham
Excavation director
She said the burial was "irregular", but added the cause of death may only be discovered when the remains are examined by a bones specialist.

"All we can say at the moment was that the burial itself was in slight disarray, it was slightly disarticulated, which means that it wasn't a normal internment," she said.

"This person wasn't laid out on their back in an east-west direction, which is normal for a Christian burial.

"The body seems to have been bundled into the position it was buried in."

Considering whether the young woman may have been killed, Dr Bermingham added: "It's not uncommon for people who have either committed crimes or people who have been murdered or whatnot to have been buried in this fashion."

Dr John O'Keeffe, principal inspector of historic monuments with the Department of the Environment, said: "I very much suspect it was somebody who probably died suddenly and tragically at the site and rather than being brought to a graveyard they were buried there.

"I don't know if that was clandestine or what."

Thousands of artefacts
The skull of the woman has sustained damage, but archaeologists are not sure if that happened prior to death or by disruption of the site in the centuries since.

The crannog site has turned out to be more significant than anyone originally thought and over the last nine months thousands of artefacts have been discovered dating between the 7th to the 16th centuries.

They include the remains of 30 wooden houses, including one which is 12m in diameter.

While the woman may be over half a millennium old, she would have lived at a time when the crannog was coming to the end of its period of habitation.

Carbon dating has confirmed that some of the site's earliest homes were built in and around 670AD.
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 22-02-2014 01:11    Post subject: Reply with quote

Better Together blame Salmond.

Quote:
Experts unearth ancient murder victim in East Lothian
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-26287895

Skeleton

The archaeologists said he was over the age of 20

Archaeologists have discovered a 900-year-old murder victim during a dig at the Scottish Seabird Centre in East Lothian.

They found the skeleton of a young man dating from the 12th or 13th Centuries while investigating Kirk Ness, which was the site of a North Berwick church.

Analysis revealed he was fatally stabbed four times in the back, twice in the left shoulder and in the ribs.

The archaeologists said he was over the age of 20.

They said his build was slightly bigger than average and his shoulder was worn down, suggesting he might have been an archer.

The dig, organised by the Scottish Seabird Centre and supported by Historic Scotland, also revealed structural remains, including stone tools, lead objects, ceramic material and bones of butchered seals, fish and seabirds which suggest a community lived at the site.

Tom Brock, chief executive of the Scottish Seabird Centre, said: "Being at the centre of a 900-year-old murder mystery is very exciting for the Scottish Seabird Centre.

"As an independent visitor attraction, conservation and education charity, we are dedicated to inspiring people to enjoy, protect and learn about their local environment, and this dig has allowed us great insight into how life was lived in the North Berwick area almost 1,000 years ago.

"The site of the centre is a historic site of national importance and visitors can find out more about this rich history from information displayed within and around the Seabird Centre."

Military men
Archaeologists uncovered various graves at the site during the dig, which was prompted by the expansion of the centre.

By assessing the size, shape and relative positions of the injuries to the bones of the murdered man, they worked out the dagger-like weapon used to stab him had a symmetrical lozenge-shaped section with very sharp edges and was probably at least 2.75ins (6.9cm) long.

Archaeologists said daggers with a lozenge-sectioned blade were a specialist military weapon and carried mainly by military men. They said this, combined with the accuracy of the stab wounds, implied a degree of professionalism in the killing and a degree of calculation.

The bones may be re-interred in the cemetery.

The dig was carried out by Edinburgh-based Addyman Archaeology, with work undertaken between 2000 and 2006 followed by scientific analysis.

The findings of the Kirk Ness project have been documented in a new book The Medieval Kirk, Cemetery and Hospice at Kirk Ness, North Berwick: The Scottish Seabird Centre Excavations 1999-2006.
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