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Where will our clean energy come from?
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 17-01-2014 22:04    Post subject: Reply with quote

A chicken shit solution.

Quote:
JG Pears plans for faeces-powered biomass generator opposed
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-nottinghamshire-25775402

The JG Pears plant in Low Marnham

The biomass generator will be powered by chicken litter, wood and other animal-'by-products'Continue reading the main story

A proposed biomass generator powered by chicken faeces and ground animal bones is causing complaints.

A planning inquiry is currently considering JG Pears' plans to expand its animal fat rendering plant with a power station at Low Marnham, near Newark.

Neighbours said the smell from the factory is already "stomach wrenching" and fear it would get worse.

But the company said it would reduce noise and smell.

JG Pears' plans for a combined heat and power plant were thrown out by Bassetlaw District Council last year but the company took the decision to appeal and an inquiry is due to make a decision next week.

'Rotting carcasses'
The company, which supplies the pet food industry, wants to generate its own electricity and feed into the National Grid.

Shona Stapleton, from the Pears Action Group, said: "We can't enjoy our gardens on summer evenings because of these large lorries full of animal waste passing our doors. It's stomach wrenching."

And Colin Fishwick described the smell from the plant as like "vomit" and "rotting carcasses".

The firm said it was refused permission by the council because of the scale, mass and height of the development and not because of smell.

In a statement the operations director Alistair Collins said: "The scheme will offer many improvements including improved odour and noise abatement from the existing activities on-site, will significantly reduce the ca
rbon footprint of the operation and generate electricity for the grid."
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 20-01-2014 08:07    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tidal energy: Pentland Firth 'could power half of Scotland'

The Pentland Firth could provide enough renewable energy to power about half of Scotland, according to research.
The firth, which lies between Orkney and the Scottish mainland, has some of the fastest tidal currents in the UK.

Engineers from Edinburgh and Oxford Universities said turbines placed in the stretch of water could generate 1.9GW of clean energy.
Turbines would need to be located across the entire width of the channel to fully exploit it, they said.

The engineers said their study narrowed down earlier estimates that the firth could produce anywhere between 1GW and 18GW of power.
They calculated as much as 4.2GW could be harnessed, but because tidal turbines are not 100% efficient the estimate of 1.9GW was a more realistic target.

They have outlined locations where turbines should be positioned to boost the area's energy producing potential.
Sites which minimise the impacts on sea life and shipping have been identified by the UK Crown Estate, which will lease them to tidal energy firms.

Prof Alistair Borthwick, of the school of engineering at the University of Edinburgh, said: "Our research builds on earlier studies by analysing the interactions between turbines and the tides more closely.
"This is a more accurate approach than was used in the early days of tidal stream power assessment, and should be useful in calculating how much power might realistically be recoverable from the Pentland Firth."

Prof Guy Houlsby, of the Department of Engineering Science at the University of Oxford, who led the study, said: "The UK enjoys potentially some of the best tidal resources worldwide, and if we exploit them wisely they could make an important contribution to our energy supply.
"These studies should move us closer towards the successful exploitation of the tides.
"

The results were welcomed by environmental group WWF Scotland.
Its director, Lang Banks, said: "The sooner we can start to deploy devices in the water the greater the chance Scotland will have at becoming a world leader in developing the technologies to turn tidal power into clean, green electricity.
"Marine renewables, such as tidal power, will have a critical role to play in meeting the Scottish government's commitment to decarbonise our power supply by 2030.
"With careful planning we can harness Scotland's tidal energy to help cut our climate emissions while safeguarding the nation's tremendous marine environment."

In September, energy company MeyGen was given permission to install what was described as the "largest tidal turbine array in Europe" in the Pentland Firth.
The project will be the first commercial deployment of tidal turbines in Scottish waters.

MeyGen said the phased project would initially see an 86MW array deployed, which could generate enough electricity to power the equivalent of 42,000 homes.
The company hopes a second phase would eventually see up to 400 submerged turbines at the site, generating some 398MW.

Scotland has been described as a Saudi Arabia of renewable energy potential, but developing power from offshore tidal streams is fraught with difficulty.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-25800448
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Pietro_Mercurios
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PostPosted: 20-01-2014 08:26    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner2 wrote:
Tidal energy: Pentland Firth 'could power half of Scotland'

The Pentland Firth could provide enough renewable energy to power about half of Scotland, according to research.
The firth, which lies between Orkney and the Scottish mainland, has some of the fastest tidal currents in the UK.

...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-25800448

Well, that's nice.
Quote:
http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2013/12/20/3093901/scotland-renewable-energy/

Renewable Energy Is Now The Source Of 40 Percent Of Scotland’s Electricity

Think Progress. By Katie Valentine. December 20, 2013

Renewable energy use is at a record high in Scotland, according to new government figures.

In 2012, Scotland got 40.3 percent of its electricity from renewable sources — up from 36.3 percent in 2011 and just 24.1 percent in 2010. The Scottish government plans to get half of its electricity from renewable energy by 2015 — a target it said it was on track to meet — and 100 percent of its electricity by 2020. Scotland’s renewable energy numbers are much higher than many other U.K. countries — renewables produced only 8.2 percent of England’s electricity in 2012, and in Wales, 8.7 percent of electricity comes from renewable sources.

“Renewable electricity in Scotland is going from strength to strength, confirming that 2012 was a record year for generation in Scotland and that 2013 looks set to be even better,” said Scotland’s energy minister Fergus Ewing.’

Lang Banks, Director of WWF Scotland, told the BBC that if Scotland is to meet its target of renewable energy generating 100 percent of electricity by 2020, the country will need to invest more in offshore wind.

“In order to remain on target Scotland will need to deploy significant amounts of offshore wind in the near future,” he said. “It’s therefore vital that the U.K. government gives a stronger signal of its ambition on the growth of offshore wind in Scotland’s seas, as well as the necessary support needed to deliver that growth.”

Wind power is Scotland’s fastest-growing renewable energy source — in In 2012, Scotland’s wind power generation jumped by 19 percent. The country is home to the U.K.’s largest wind farm and constructed its first offshore wind farm in April 2010. The country is also working to harness tidal power and is home to world’s first commercial wave power generator.
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 26-02-2014 17:11    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some forces are determined to prevent people from using solar power. The law is meant to protect the power companies I guess.

Quote:
Florida woman forced to use city utilities instead of private solar panels, rainwater
Published time: February 25, 2014 22:44
Edited time: February 26, 2014 04:48
http://rt.com/usa/florida-woman-private-utilities-735/

AFP Photo/Thierry Zoccolan

A Cape Coral, Florida woman living “off the grid” was ordered last week by a magistrate to hook up to utilities to comply with city codes or risk eviction from her home.

Special Magistrate Harold S. Eskin ruled Thursday that Robin Speronis violated city codes by refusing to connect to the Cape Coral’s water system. Eskin ordered Speronis to pay for water service, adding that her sewer access would be capped until she did, The News-Press reported.

“I am in compliance,” Speronis told the News-Press. “I’m in compliance of living … you may have to hook-up, but you don’t have to use it. Well, what’s the point?”

In addition, her alternative source of energy must be approved by the city, Eskin ruled. The city contends that using rainwater and solar energy violates the International Property Maintenance Code, which is used in many US and Canadian communities. It “states that properties are unsafe to live in if they do not have electricity and running water,” according to Off The Grid News, though Speronis has both electricity and water.

Eskin also pointed out that several liens were placed on her home given Speronis had used drains but without paying water bills.

“This resident provided testimony at the code compliance hearing that she has been living in the home for the past year and using the city’s wastewater system without paying for the service,” said Connie Barron, a spokeswoman for Cape Coral.

Yet the Magistrate said the city abused its authority by not giving Speronis proper notice of the supposed violations. Speronis was given an eviction notice in November.

City spokeswoman Barron said the sewer would have been capped sooner, but the city decided to wait for the code hearing. The city had actually overlooked Speronis’ setup until she did an interview with a local television station regarding her living arrangements.

Eskin did admit, though, that the city’s code may be obsolete.

“Reasonableness and code requirements don’t always go hand-in-hand … given societal and technical changes (that) requires review of code ordinances,” said Eskin, who actually dropped two of three counts against Speronis.

Speronis’ attorney posited that there’s a conflict in the city’s code, given Speronis has been ordered to hook up to the water system despite city officials’ admittance that she does not have to use it.

“It was a mental fistfight,” Speronis’ attorney Todd Allen said of Eskin’s review of the case. “There’s an inherent conflict in the code.”

For her part, Speronis said she does not intend to hook up to the city’s water system, vowing to appeal the Magistrate’s ruling.

“I know how to live off the grid completely and in a sanitary way,” Speronis said in response to the city’s action, according to The News-Press. “That’s what seven months living in the woods taught me. I do have an alternative toilet from my days of living in the woods.”

The Cape Coral resident said she will dispose of waste just as dog owners do for pets. She also plans to collect wastewater in containers for use in her garden.

Speronis already collects rainwater for bathing and other uses, all while generating electricity with solar panels.

“What happens in the courtroom is much less important than touching people’s hearts and minds,” she told Off The Grid News. “I think that we are continuing to be successful in doing just that and I am so pleased — there is hope! [Friday] morning, as I took my two hour walk, there was a young man, unknown to me, who drove by me, tooted his horn and said, ‘Robin, congratulations on your victory yesterday, keep up the fight and God bless you.’ That is beautiful.”
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 10-04-2014 09:31    Post subject: Reply with quote

Global solar dominance in sight as science trumps fossil fuels
Solar power will slowly squeeze the revenues of petro-rentier regimes in Russia, Venezuela and Saudi Arabia. They will have to find a new business model, or fade into decline
By Ambrose Evans-Pritchard
5:58PM BST 09 Apr 2014

Solar power has won the global argument. Photovoltaic energy is already so cheap that it competes with oil, diesel and liquefied natural gas in much of Asia without subsidies.

Roughly 29pc of electricity capacity added in America last year came from solar, rising to 100pc even in Massachusetts and Vermont. "More solar has been installed in the US in the past 18 months than in 30 years," says the US Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA). California's subsidy pot is drying up but new solar has hardly missed a beat.

The technology is improving so fast - helped by the US military - that it has achieved a virtous circle. Michael Parker and Flora Chang, at Sanford Bernstein, say we entering a new order of "global energy deflation" that must ineluctably erode the viability of oil, gas and the fossil fuel nexus over time. In the 1980s solar development was stopped in its tracks by the slump in oil prices. By now it has surely crossed the threshold irreversibly.

The ratchet effect of energy deflation may be imperceptible at first since solar makes up just 0.17pc of the world's $5 trillion energy market, or 3pc of its electricity. The trend does not preclude cyclical oil booms along the way. Nor does it obviate the need for shale fracking as a stop-gap, for national security reasons or in Britain's case to curb a shocking current account deficit of 5.4pc of GDP.

But the technology momentum goes only one way. "Eventually solar will become so large that there will be consequences everywhere," they said. This remarkable overthrow of everthing we take for granted in world energy politics may occur within "the better part of a decade".

If the hypothesis is broadly correct, solar will slowly squeeze the revenues of petro-rentier regimes in Russia, Venezuela and Saudi Arabia, among others. Many already need oil prices near $100 a barrel to cover their welfare budgets and military spending. They will have to find a new business model, or fade into decline.

The Saudis are themselves betting on solar, investing more than $100bn in 41 gigawatts (GW) of capacity, enough to cover 30pc of their power needs by 2030 rather than burning fossil fuel needed for exports. Most of the Gulf states have comparable plans. That will mean more crude - ceteris paribus - washing into a deflating global energy market.

Clean Energy Trends says new solar installations overtook wind turbines worldwide last year with an extra 36.5GW. China alone accounted for a third. Wind is still ahead with 2.5 times old capacity but the "solar sorpasso" will be reached in 2021 as photovoltaic (PV) costs keep falling.

The US National Renewable Energy Laboratory says scientists can now capture 31.1pc of the sun's energy with a 111-V Solar Cell, a world record but soon to be beaten again no doubt. This will find its way briskly into routine use. Wind cannot keep pace. It is static by comparison, a regional niche at best.

A McKinsey study said the average cost of installed solar power in the US across all sectors has dropped to $2.59 from more than $6 a watt in 2010. It expects this fall to $2.30 by next year and $1.60 by 2020. This will put solar within "striking distance" of coal and gas, it said.

Solar cell prices have already collapsed so far that other "soft costs" now make up 64pc of residential solar installation in the US. Germany has shown that this too can be slashed, partly by sheer scale.

Quote:
It is hard to keep up with the cascade of research papers emerging from brain-trusts in North America, Europe and Japan, so many brimming with optimism. The University of Buffalo has developed a nanoscale microchip able to capture a "rainbow" of wavelengths and absorb far more light. A team at Oxford is pioneering use of perovskite, an abundant material that is cheaper than silicon and produces 40pc more voltage.

One by one, the seemingly intractable obstacles are being conquered. Israel's Ecoppia has just begun using robots to clean the panels of its Ketura Sun park in the Negev desert without the use of water, until now a big constraint. It is beautifully simple. Soft microfibers sweep away 99pc of the dust each night with the help of airflows.

Professor Michael Aziz, at Harvard University, is developing a flow-battery with funding from the US Advanced Research Projects Agency over the next three years that promises to cut the cost of energy storage by two-thirds below the latest vanadium batteries used in Japan.
He said the technology gives us a "fighting chance" to overcome the curse of intermittency from wind and solar power, which both spike and drop off in bursts. "I foresee a future where we can vastly cut down on fossil fuel use."

Even thermal solar is coming of age, driven for now by use of molten salts to store heat and release power hours later. California opened the world's biggest solar thermal park in February in the Mojave desert - the Ivanpah project, co-owned by Google and BrightSource Energy - able to produce power for almost 100,000 homes by reflecting sunlight from 170,000 mirrors onto boilers that generate electricity from steam. Ivanpah still relies on subsidies but a new SunPower project in Chile will go naked, selling 70 megawatts into the spot market.

Deutsche Bank say there are already 19 regional markets around the world that have achieved "grid parity", meaning that PV solar panels can match or undercut local electricity prices without subsidy: California, Chile, Australia, Turkey, Israel, Germany, Japan, Italy, Spain and Greece, for residential power, as well as Mexico and China for industrial power.

This will spread as battery storage costs - often a spin-off from electric car ventures - keep dropping. Sanford Bernstein says it may not be long before home energy storage is cheap enough to lure households away from the grid en masse across the world.

Utilities that fail to adapt fast will face "disaster". Solar competes directly. Each year it is supplying a bigger chunk of peak power needs in the middle of the day when air conditioners and factories are both at full throttle. "Demand during what was one of the most profitable times of the day disappears," said the report. They cannot raise prices to claw back lost income. That would merely accelerate what they most fear. They are trapped.

Michael Liebreich, from Bloomberg New Energy Finance, says we can already discern the moment of "peak fossil fuels" around 2030, the tipping point when the world starts using less coal, oil and gas in absolute terms, but because they cannot compete, not because they are running out.

This is a remarkable twist of history. Just six years ago we faced an oil shock with crude trading at $148. The rise of "Chindia" and the sudden inclusion of 2bn consumers into the affluent world seemed to be taxing resources to breaking point. Now we can imagine how China will fuel its future fleet of 400m vehicles. Many may be electric, charged by PV modules.

For Germany it is a bitter-sweet vindication. The country sank €100bn into feed-in tariffs or in solar companies that blazed the trail, did us all a favour, and mostly went bankrupt, displaced by copy-cat competitors in China. The Germans have the world's biggest solar infrastructure, but latecomers can now tap futuristic technology.

For Britain it offers a reprieve after 20 years of energy drift. Yet the possibility of global energy deflation raises a quandry: should the country lock into more nuclear power stations with strike-prices fixed for 35 years? Should it spend £100bn on offshore wind when imported LNG might be cheaper long hence?

For the world it portends a once-in-a-century upset of the geostrategic order. Sheikh Ahmed-Zaki Yamani, the veteran Saudi oil minister, saw the writing on the wall long ago. "Thirty years from now there will be a huge amount of oil - and no buyers. Oil will be left in the ground. The Stone Age came to an end, not because we had a lack of stones, and the oil age will come to an end not because we have a lack of oil," he told The Telegraph in 2000. Wise old owl.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/comment/ambroseevans_pritchard/10755598/Global-solar-dominance-in-sight-as-science-trumps-fossil-fuels.html
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MythopoeikaOffline
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PostPosted: 10-04-2014 19:12    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting story here about fuel made from seawater:

http://www.nrl.navy.mil/media/news-releases/2014/scale-model-wwii-craft-takes-flight-with-fuel-from-the-sea-concept

It sounds good on the surface of it, but since it would require the stripping of all algae from the sea, I think that would be A Very Bad Idea.
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 10-04-2014 19:46    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mythopoeika wrote:
Interesting story here about fuel made from seawater:

http://www.nrl.navy.mil/media/news-releases/2014/scale-model-wwii-craft-takes-flight-with-fuel-from-the-sea-concept

It sounds good on the surface of it, but since it would require the stripping of all algae from the sea, I think that would be A Very Bad Idea.


Indeed, we're going to make Soylent Green out of the algae.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 10-04-2014 20:22    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mythopoeika wrote:
Interesting story here about fuel made from seawater:

http://www.nrl.navy.mil/media/news-releases/2014/scale-model-wwii-craft-takes-flight-with-fuel-from-the-sea-concept

It sounds good on the surface of it, but since it would require the stripping of all algae from the sea, I think that would be A Very Bad Idea.

But that article doesn't mention algae...

But even if it did, I think the logistics of processing all the world's oceans would be beyond our technology!
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PostPosted: 10-04-2014 21:21    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner2 wrote:
Mythopoeika wrote:
Interesting story here about fuel made from seawater:

http://www.nrl.navy.mil/media/news-releases/2014/scale-model-wwii-craft-takes-flight-with-fuel-from-the-sea-concept

It sounds good on the surface of it, but since it would require the stripping of all algae from the sea, I think that would be A Very Bad Idea.

But that article doesn't mention algae...

But even if it did, I think the logistics of processing all the world's oceans would be beyond our technology!


It doesn't specifically mention algae, but wouldn't you need to filter the water in order to process it in the fashion described? That's what I'm thinking.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 10-04-2014 22:10    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mythopoeika wrote:
It doesn't specifically mention algae, but wouldn't you need to filter the water in order to process it in the fashion described? That's what I'm thinking.

Maybe. But how many gallons of sea-water do you need to make a gallon of aviation fuel?

Doesn't really matter, because I don't doubt the world's need for fuel would only use a tiny proportion of all the world's oceans.

(If not, we are truly F*cked!)
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PostPosted: 12-04-2014 08:04    Post subject: Reply with quote

Backing up Green Energy with - er - dirty energy... Sad

Germany's green dreams meet harsh reality
David Shukman takes a look at the massive scale of Germany's coal-mining operation

A vision for a greener future for the world seems very distant if you descend into the heart of one of Germany's largest coal mines.
While researchers and officials are in Berlin preparing the next report from the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the country's fossil fuel industry is as busy as ever.

The report is expected to set out options to switch from sources of energy that give off the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide to cleaner types like wind and solar.
This mirrors Germany's own ambitions with a plan known as the Energiewende, best translated as "energy transition", which calls for at least 80% of power to come from renewable sources by 2050.

But south of Berlin in the region of Lausitz, down at the coal face in a mine called Welszow-South, machines the size of office blocks gouge out chunks of lignite and low-carbon dreams hardly seem plausible.
The lignite, also known as brown coal, is one of the dirtiest, most polluting kinds of fuel, but it helps generate no less than 26% of Germany's electricity.
Add in the country's harder black coal as well and you find that nearly half of the country's electricity comes from the one source which climate scientists argue most needs to be phased out.

The challenge is that, for the moment, coal offers a relatively cheap and easy solution, there is plenty of it and thousands of jobs are involved so the mining enjoys robust support from unions and local politicians.

For a country that prides itself on showing green leadership, and hosting the IPCC meeting, the reliance on coal illustrates the sheer difficulty of turning visions into reality.
Germany is in the bizarre position of being the world's largest producer of solar power - and of lignite.

The dark cliffs of brown coal stretch for miles, exposed to the air for the first time since they formed from a swampy forest that lay along the shores of the North Sea 17 million years ago.
Ancient twists of branches, compacted and dusty, lie inside the coal, a reminder of a process that once sucked huge amounts of carbon dioxide out of the air, only for it now to be released back into the atmosphere.

The mine is one of several operated by the Swedish state-owned company Vattenfall and its managers are bullish about the prospects.
In addition to the lignite already earmarked for extraction, they say there are another 1.6 billion tonnes approved for future mining in this area alone and demand remains high.

The head of operations, Uwe Grosser, is polite about the "energy transition" and the advent of renewables but dismisses the idea of a future without coal.
"We're the only ones who deliver constant power. Our power is always there.
"When solar, wind and the renewables are fed into the grid we're the only ones able to adjust our output, that's the only way it's possible to prioritise renewables.
"If they can't provide power. We can. 24 hours a day. 365 days a year."

etc...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-26988695


Last edited by rynner2 on 05-06-2014 10:21; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: 05-06-2014 10:20    Post subject: Reply with quote

Solar Power Portal wrote:
Martifer Solar reveals 100MW UK pipeline

Martifer Solar has announced that it is has a 100MW pipeline of projects in development in the UK.

The Portuguese integrated PV EPC firm claims that the new portfolio will be completed by early 2015. The portfolio will be solar to third part investors upon completion.

Henrique Rodrigues, CEO of Martifer Solar, said that the new portfolio of projects in the UK is helping the company “reshape its core business” as the company aims shore up its position as a developer across various global solar markets.

João Cunha, director of Martifer Solar UK, added: “We have already proven our capabilities with almost 110 MW of utility-scale projects completed within a year, and we are looking to double this capacity for the next year, maintaining a strong and dynamic growth in the UK market.”

The portfolio consists of solar farms ranging in size from 5MW to 26MW, located in the South, Midlands and Wales. The new projects build on the company's previous UK pipeline of 78.4MW in 2014.

The UK solar market is predicted to be Europe’s largest solar market in 2014. However, the continued growth of the utility-scale market is under threat after the government announced plans to remove renewable obligation (RO) support for projects over 5MW from April 2015. Martifer Solar believes that the transition from the RO support scheme to contracts for difference (CfDs) in April 2015 will be smooth, remaining confident about the performance of the UK utility-scale solar market. The company points to governmental polling data which shows that 85% of Brits support the deployment of solar in the UK as cause for optimism.


http://www.solarpowerportal.co.uk/news/martifer_solar_reveals_100mw_uk_pipeline_2356
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PostPosted: 09-06-2014 18:08    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, I haven't been able to find anything about this crazy thing on the board. It's a mad idea, but it's surprising (and worrying) how many people are starting to take it seriously. Which may be the difference between whether or not crazy ideas work.

Solar Roadways

SOLAR FREAKIN' ROADWAYS - Don't watch if you find loud Americans obnoxious.

Sounds like madness to me. And I have read a lot of criticism from various quarters. Some of those criticisms are answered here!

Deluded crackpots with good intentions? Scammers? True geniuses who will pave our future with light and energy?
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MythopoeikaOffline
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PostPosted: 09-06-2014 19:50    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's an interesting idea, but I can't see it ever being used widely, because of the cost and hassle factor. It might get used for some parts of certain roads, where markings need to be changed regularly, but not all over the place.
The reason why roads are made the way they are is (a) cost and (b) ease of repair. I can't see that changing in a hurry.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 09-06-2014 20:06    Post subject: Reply with quote

PeteByrdie wrote:


Solar Roadways

SOLAR FREAKIN' ROADWAYS - Don't watch if you find loud Americans obnoxious.

Sounds like madness to me. And I have read a lot of criticism from various quarters. Some of those criticisms are answered here!

Deluded crackpots with good intentions? Scammers? True geniuses who will pave our future with light and energy?

Thanks for bringing this to our attention. I didn't watch the 'loud Americans' videos, but the overlong text passages suggest what they might be like!

Nevertheless, I think they have latched on to an idea with great potential. Now they need to concentrate on the engineering, and hire a good PR team to handle publicity. (IE, a team that understands that less is more in terms of verbiage.) And/or an educational department that can explain things simply and briefly, while providing further material in a structured system for those who want more detailed knowledge.

A lot of stuff in their current presentation could just be dumped, eg:

Quote:
"We wonder about people who reflexively dismiss our concept without trying to understand it, or go on public forums to attack us. It's helps us to remember that there have always been people against change. For some it's just too scary. They want to just keep things the same. Perhaps they are the descendants of those who argued that the earth was flat, that we didn't need cars because horses worked just fine, told the Wright Brothers they were out of their minds, or insisted that we'd never reach the moon. Or perhaps they are the voices of larger entities who are now feeling threatened by the paradigm shift that is Solar Roadways."

That just comes across as whining - it's not the voice of someone who is confident with his ideas. Leave the whining to the critics, just put forward the positives in your work.

And do we really need so many words about how ice and snow make driving dangerous? That's just stating the obvious, and suggests a degree of condescension towards the reader.

Anyhow, rynner is available for consultations, reasonable fees...

Oh bugger, I'll probably get banned for spamming now!
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