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Mummies
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 07-12-2012 11:54    Post subject: Reply with quote

Zilch5 wrote:
ramonmercado wrote:


Interesting book on the topic: The Mummies of Urumchi by Elizabeth Wayland Barber. Review: http://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-393-04521-5


Thanks! I will put it on my Christmas wishlist - but I will doubt I will get it. Sad


It went into paperback and should be relatively easy to get. Just noticed that my own copy seems to be missing. A visit to second-hand book shops is called for.
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Sergeant_PluckOffline
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PostPosted: 07-12-2012 12:12    Post subject: Reply with quote

ramonmercado wrote:
A visit to second-hand book shops is called for.


1p from an Amazon reseller, plus a bit for postage.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/offer-listing/0333730240/ref=sr_1_1_olp?ie=UTF8&qid=1354882296&sr=8-1&condition=used
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 07-12-2012 12:45    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sergeant_Pluck wrote:
ramonmercado wrote:
A visit to second-hand book shops is called for.


1p from an Amazon reseller, plus a bit for postage.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/offer-listing/0333730240/ref=sr_1_1_olp?ie=UTF8&qid=1354882296&sr=8-1&condition=used


For a hardcover edition!
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 20-02-2013 09:03    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not far from here, as the seagull flies...

Cat mummy discovered in Cornish attic
[video]
19 February 2013 Last updated at 19:27

A man from Cornwall who found a dusty stuffed cat in his attic has discovered it is a 2,000 year old mummy.
Peter Gray from Porthscatho, near St Mawes, had the cat stored away for about 50 years.
He said: "It's been languishing in the attic. My father always said to get it x-rayed. The vets have confirmed it is a mummified cat and not a fake."

Mr Gray's father did a lot of work for museums around the country. He was given the mummy as a thank you gift.
The Royal Cornwall Museum in Truro has confirmed the mummy is 2,000 years old.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-21512262
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Ronson8Offline
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PostPosted: 20-02-2013 10:18    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner2 wrote:
He was given the mummy as a thank you gift.

I think I'd rather have had bottle of whiskey or a box of chocolates. Smile
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Zilch5Offline
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PostPosted: 11-03-2013 01:27    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Study: Even ancient mummies had clogged arteries

LONDON (AP) -- Even without modern-day temptations like fast food or cigarettes, people had clogged arteries some 4,000 years ago, according to the biggest-ever study of mummies searching for the condition.

Researchers say that suggests heart disease may be more a natural part of human aging rather than being directly tied to contemporary risk factors like smoking, eating fatty foods and not exercising.

CT scans of 137 mummies showed evidence of atherosclerosis, or hardened arteries, in one third of those examined, including those from ancient people believed to have healthy lifestyles. Atherosclerosis causes heart attacks and strokes. More than half of the mummies were from Egypt while the rest were from Peru, southwest America and the Aleutian islands in Alaska. The mummies were from about 3800 B.C. to 1900 A.D.


More at the link: http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/E/EU_MED_MUMMIES_HEART_DISEASE?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2013-03-10-20-16-55
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Ronson8Offline
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PostPosted: 11-03-2013 09:11    Post subject: Reply with quote

1900AD? quite recent then.
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krakentenOffline
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PostPosted: 09-04-2013 15:38    Post subject: Reply with quote

The mummies from 1900AD-or CE for the picky-were probably from Alaska, things were pretty wild there, even then. For that matter, even now.

For a look at an Alaska that might have been, read "The Yiddish Policeman's Union" by Michael Chabon.

This examens what might have happened had a scheme to settle Jews displaced from Europe in Sitka,AK. come to pass. Great book!The Japanese invasion during WWII and the Cold War did wonders for Alaska, just imagine what a city full of educated and industrious people, suddenly appearing there might have done?
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Pietro_Mercurios
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PostPosted: 09-04-2013 15:48    Post subject: Reply with quote

krakenten wrote:
...

This examens what might have happened had a scheme to settle Jews displaced from Europe in Sitka,AK. come to pass. Great book!The Japanese invasion during WWII and the Cold War did wonders for Alaska, just imagine what a city full of educated and industrious people, suddenly appearing there might have done?

Excellent book, but no mummies involved.
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krakentenOffline
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PostPosted: 10-04-2013 02:01    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just an aside, there.

The Aleutians have yielded 'cold' mummies, freeze dried cadavers, in some numbers. Mummies from the Andes and our old pal, Otzi the Ice Man are of this sort.

I wonder what scientists of the future will think when they begin to dig up our cemeteries? If you ever read "The Motel of the Mysteries" you might get an idea!
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 23-06-2013 06:55    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner2 wrote:
Cat mummy discovered in Cornish attic
[video]
19 February 2013 Last updated at 19:27

A man from Cornwall who found a dusty stuffed cat in his attic has discovered it is a 2,000 year old mummy.

...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-21512262

Egyptian mummified cat discovered in dusty Portscatho attic to go on show
1:00pm Saturday 22nd June 2013 in Truro

An Egyptian mummified cat discovered earlier this year in a dark, dusty attic at Portscatho is being given the opportunity to star in the limelight at the Royal Cornwall Museum.
The cat will be placed on loan by owner, Robert Gray, on Monday, June 24 and put on display near an Egyptian mummified ibis bird at the Museum.

Robert rediscovered the cat, named ‘Mao’ in the attic of his house in Portscatho and brought it in to the Royal Cornwall Museum for identification in February this year.

Jane Marley, Curator of Archaeology and World Cultures, identified the object as an Egyptian mummified cat. Due to the fine ‘diamond’ style of linen bandaging and the way the cat’s head is modelled in linen, this example can be dated to the Roman period in Egypt to the 2nd century AD.
At Jane Marley’s suggestion Robert took ‘Mao’ to be x-rayed at Clifton Villa Veterinary Surgery to find out more and the x-ray revealed that there was a small, complete cat or kitten within the bandages.

Robert was given the cat by his father Mr P Gray, an Egyptologist, who had acquired the cat in the 1960’s as a gift and believed that it had been in Britain since the 1850’s.
Mr Gray x-rayed over 200 mummies in Europe and became the established expert in the field. Robert has never forgotten his childhood experience with his father when he x-rayed Iset-tayef-nakht, the mummified priest and craftsman on display at Royal Cornwall Museum, on 6th January 1969 at the Royal Cornwall Hospital, Treliske.

It is because of this long-standing relationship with the Museum that Robert is lending the cat for displa. He said: "I am thrilled to be following in my late father’s footsteps 50 years on and to be giving the mummified cat to the Royal Cornwall Museum for all to enjoy.’

Visitors interested in viewing the cat will find it on display in the new gallery: Unwrapping the Past, featuring the ancient civilisations of Egypt, Greece and Rome and Iset-tayef-nakht, the unwrapped mummy.
Museum director, Hilary Bracegirdle said: "I am so very pleased that Robert has decided to lend us Mao for display. Such an excellent example of a mummified cat makes a brilliant addition to the museum’s Unwrapping the Past Gallery."

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/truro/10497876.Egyptian_mummified_cat_discovered_in_dusty_Portscatho_attic_to_go_on_show/?ref=ec
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 20-11-2013 01:04    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Ancient Egyptians may have used balms to add flavor to mummified meat
November 19th, 2013 in Other Sciences / Archaeology & Fossils

Ancient Egyptians may have used balms to add flavor to mummified meat
Beef rib meat mummy from the tomb of Yuya and Tjuiu (1386-1349 BC). Credit: PNAS.

Beef rib meat mummy from the tomb of Yuya and Tjuiu (1386-1349 BC). Credit: PNAS.

(Phys.org) —The ancient Egyptians' elaborate preparations for the afterlife are well known. To ensure continued comfort and happiness after death, high status Egyptians had themselves interred with furniture, jewelry and even mummified pets. Many tombs contain pieces of mummified meat, wrapped in bandages and covered in balm. Richard Evershed of the University of Bristol and his team chemically analyzed the balms on some of these mummified meats. They believe the Egyptians used the balms for preservation and flavor enhancement. Their research appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Archeologists have discovered hundreds of meat mummies in ancient Egyptian tombs. Most of them are joints of meat or poultry, prepared as if for eating, then wrapped. Dark residue that covers the bandages looks like the organic balms applied to human and animal mummies. Until now, however, researchers have not known whether those who prepared the mummies intentionally added the balms to the meat.

To find out more, Evershed and his colleagues used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to examine four pieces of mummified meat stored at the Cairo Museum and the British Museum. They found that the composition of the balms varied over time and think the ancient Egyptians added then deliberately.

External bandages from a victual calf mummy, dated from 1064 to 948 BC, in the tomb of Isetemkheb, the wife of a high priest, contained compounds made from animal fat. Because these compounds had no contact with the meat, the researchers think they were not grease from the meat, but a balm applied deliberately as a preservative.

Mummified goat tissue from around 1290 BC, taken from the tomb of the priestess Henutmehyt, also contained substances derived from animal fat. However, the researchers could not tell whether this came from the animal itself or whether the meat mummy's preparers added the substance as a balm. Mummified duck tissue found in the same food box did not contain any added fatty substance.

The most luxurious coating was on bandages covering mummified beef ribs, dated between 1386 and 1349 BC, found in the tomb of Yuya and Tjuiu, the parents of Queen Tiye, the wife of Pharaoh Amenhotep III. These bandages contained a mixture a fat or oil, beeswax and Pistacia resin, imported from the Mediterranean. Associated with royalty, Pistacia resin was used as incense, varnish and flavoring. The earliest known use of Pistacia resin in human mummification did not occur for another six centuries.

More information: Organic chemistry of balms used in the preparation of pharaonic meat mummies, PNAS, Published online before print November 18, 2013, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1315160110

Abstract
The funeral preparations for ancient Egyptian dead were extensive. Tomb walls were often elaborately painted and inscribed with scenes and objects deemed desirable for the afterlife. Votive objects, furniture, clothing, jewelry, and importantly, food including bread, cereals, fruit, jars of wine, beer, oil, meat, and poultry were included in the burial goods. An intriguing feature of the meat and poultry produced for the deceased from the highest levels of Egyptian society was that they were mummified to ensure their preservation. However, little is known about the way they were prepared, such as whether balms were used, and if they were used, how they compared with those applied to human and animal mummies? We present herein the results of lipid biomarker and stable carbon isotope investigations of tissues, bandaging, and organic balms associated with a variety of meat mummies that reveal that treatments ranged from simple desiccation and wrapping in bandages to, in the case of the tomb of Yuya and Tjuia (18th Dynasty, 1386–1349 BC), a balm associated with a beef rib mummy containing a high abundance of Pistacia resin and, thus, more sophisticated than the balms found on many contemporaneous human mummies.

© 2013 Phys.org

"Ancient Egyptians may have used balms to add flavor to mummified meat." November 19th, 2013. http://phys.org/news/2013-11-ancient-egyptians-balms-flavor-mummified.html
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krakentenOffline
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PostPosted: 27-11-2013 00:57    Post subject: Reply with quote

I went to see the mummy exhibit at the Maryland Science Center, here in Baltimore.

A good show, if it comes to a place near you, it's worth catching.

One of the items on display was a mummified rat. Now, not to cast asparagus...mice and rats mummify naturally, no help needed.

When the 'pyramid power' hoax was all the rage, mouse carcasses were put into cardboard pyramids, there, they mummified, no mystic power needed. Rats, bats, mice, shrews and voles will turn into pretty good lil' mummikins.

A few tana leaves, they're rarin' to go !

One of my favorite mummies is the Soap Man. Sylvester the Desert Mummy is all time champ,

Or, so sez I.
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escargot1Offline
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PostPosted: 27-11-2013 20:25    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm in Rome and have visited here today - the Capuchin Crypt.

Mostly skeletons, artfully arranged both complete and it bits around the walls and ceilings. Some are naturally well enough preserved to still have facial skin and even beards.

We enjoyed our very gruesome visit. Immediately after us was a party of schoolkids. They were mainly horrified and I bet there'll be some wet beds tonight! Laughing
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SpookdaddyOffline
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PostPosted: 27-11-2013 20:45    Post subject: Reply with quote

escargot1 wrote:
I'm in Rome and have visited here today - the Capuchin Crypt...


That reminds me of the Chapel of Bones on Malta.

My grandfather was stationed on the island in the late 1920's and early 1930's and there are some photographs or postcards of the place in one of his old albums - used to give me the proper shivers as a kid.

I've only just found out that the site was destroyed during WW2.

I'll try and dig up the photo's when I see my parents at the weekend.
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