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The Picts
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Pietro_Mercurios
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PostPosted: 11-02-2013 12:41    Post subject: Reply with quote

oldrover wrote:
Zilch5 wrote:
But there isn't a Scoti thread and this statue would be of the time of the Picts, right? Wrong, no doubt...


No you're wrong, what you say is quite right. This would definitely date from the Pict's era.

That's why the article mentions, Caledonians.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caledonia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotland_during_the_Roman_Empire
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caledonians
http://www.unrv.com/provinces/caledonia.php


Originally they called the inhabitants of Scotland, Caledonians, after one of the local tribes and looked on them as Britons, same as the rest of the inhabitants of the Gods forsaken outpost islands. Then when the Caledonians started kicking up rough, the Romans started calling them, 'Picts', instead, which is Roman for, 'tattooed neds'.

The Romans thought they could bundle them in with the rest of Britain, too. They learned otherwise. Hence the tying of Caledonians/Picts up and the feeding of them to big cats.
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 11-02-2013 13:14    Post subject: Reply with quote

This hastened the die off of big cats in Europe.
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Pietro_Mercurios
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PostPosted: 11-02-2013 13:15    Post subject: Reply with quote

ramonmercado wrote:
This hastened the die off of big cats in Europe.

Once the 'Tattooed Neds' managed to get their hands loose, anyway.
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 11-02-2013 13:17    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pietro_Mercurios wrote:
ramonmercado wrote:
This hastened the die off of big cats in Europe.

Once the 'Tattooed Neds' managed to get their hands loose, anyway.


Why isn't there a like button? Very Happy
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 11-04-2013 22:10    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Pictish written language discovered in Scotland
http://termcoord.wordpress.com/2013/04/10/pictish-written-language-discovered-in-scotland/
Posted on April 10, 2013 by TermCoord

A new language dating back to the Scottish Iron Age has been identified on carved stones.

These inscriptions are believed to belong to the early Pict society living from ca 300 to 843 AD, in modern-day eastern and northern Scotland. The Picts, meaning “the Painted Ones”, were named by the Roman Eumenius in 297 AD and are renowned for having repeatedly repelled invasions from both Romans and Angles, creating a clear North-South division of the British Isles.

Celtic tribes around Ireland, Wales and Scotland are known for their use of stylised stones as signs of ownership and to indicate their names. In the past, some two dozen Pictish Ogham inscriptions had been found in the north and north-west of Scotland. Oghams, also called Primitive Irish, compose a lexigraphic language and the earliest inscriptions discovered date back to the 4th century AD.

The new written language discovered in Scotland differ however very much from Ogham as the study published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society A, led by Rob Lee, Philip Jonathan and Pauline Ziman reveals.

Indeed, in order to identify the languages, the three professors applied a mathematical method called Shannon Entropy. This process studies the order, direction, randomness and other characteristics of the different engravings. The results have then been compared to English prose fictions, Chinese prose and poetry, Egyptian monumental texts, Mycenaen lists, king and genealogical list, English texts transposed in morse code and Sematogram heraldic. This calculation also included Irish, Welsh, Norse, Turkish, Basque, Finnish, Korean as well as ancient inscriptions from the British Isles (Latin, Anglo-Saxon, Old Norse, Ancient Irish and Old Welsh).

Even though the study reveals that the Pictish symbols discovered are part of a lexigraphic writing (containing symbols that represent parts of speech), the researchers came to the conclusion that the stones would also present semasiographic symbols (that do not represent speech). Thus, the stone called Hilton of Cadboll features pictures of riders and horn blowers next to hunting dogs.

The team conducting the study however did not possess enough information to achieve a decipherment. As they say: “In order to answer the question of whether the symbols are words or syllables, and thus define a system from which a decipherment can be initiated, a complete visual catalogue of the stones and the symbols will need to be created and the effect of widening the symbol set investigated”.

In the future, more research will probably derive from the existing findings leading to a complete decipherment of this Iron Age language.
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JamesWhiteheadOffline
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PostPosted: 12-04-2013 00:05    Post subject: Reply with quote

Discovery of a new-old language is exciting, though the bits of Ogham we have don't amount to a literature exactly, being epitaphs chiefly. I'd guess these Pictish inscriptions are along the same lines. Still, every scrap of information from this period is welcome. Smile
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CavynautOffline
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PostPosted: 12-05-2013 16:04    Post subject: Reply with quote

A couple of pictures that some might find interesting. They are of the Eagle Stone in Strathpeffer, a Pictish boundary stone from what I can understand.

http://i101.photobucket.com/albums/m42/morag57/211.jpg

http://i101.photobucket.com/albums/m42/morag57/209.jpg
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stunevilleOffline
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PostPosted: 12-05-2013 18:17    Post subject: Reply with quote

Impressive stone that! Good pics too.
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CavynautOffline
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PostPosted: 13-05-2013 00:38    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cheers! The uppermost has the site of Knock Ferril (sp?) vitrified fort in the background. Didn't get to visit it, a nasty looking cow barred our way as we walked along the old HR trackbed. Sad
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 13-05-2013 12:53    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nasty looking cow? Some use you'll be come the revolution.
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PostPosted: 16-09-2013 01:44    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
'Early Pictish Royal remains' discovered at Rhynie

The remains of what it is thought could be a member of early Pictish royalty have been discovered during an archaeological dig in Aberdeenshire.

The discovery at Rhynie was made by teams from the universities of Aberdeen and Chester.

The remains were found in a carefully made sandstone grave, which the experts believe suggests the person was of high status.

It is the first time remains of a body have been uncovered at the site.

Project leader Dr Gordon Noble, of the University of Aberdeen, said: "We found elements of the legs, pelvis and jaw bone which we recovered and are now analysing in the lab.

"It's extremely rare to find any human remains from this era in the north east of Scotland as the soil in this part of the world is so acidic.

"One of the graves had been carefully made from split sandstone slabs to create a cist and the stone lining and collapsed capstones helped to preserve skeletal material.

"Unlike Anglo-Saxon areas to the south, the tradition in Scotland was largely for unfurnished burial so we didn't expect to find rich grave assemblages."


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-24018459
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