Forums

 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages 
Out of place animals
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 30, 31, 32 ... 40, 41, 42  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Fortean Times Message Board Forum Index -> Cryptozoology - general
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 21071
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 21-02-2012 13:11    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Rare shark caught off coast of Galway
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2012/0220/1224312052732.html
LORNA SIGGINS, Marine Correspondent

Mon, Feb 20, 2012

A RARE deepwater shark and a “monster” mackerel have been landed by two Irish fishing vessels into Rossaveal, Co Galway.

The shark, which has been identified as a sharpback (Oxynotus Paradoxus), was caught by skipper Colin Reynolds and his crew of the Fragrant Cloud .

Reynolds had never seen anything like the dark-coloured 65cm fish with clearly visible claspers, very rough skin which was taken in a net at 500m.

Sea Fisheries Protection Agency officer Siubhán Ní Churraidhín said the flattened underside suggested that the shark crawled across the seafloor, and its clearly visible teeth resembled a lamprey.

Rare fish expert Dr Declan Quigley, who has kept records with fellow expert Kevin Flannery of Dingle, Co Kerry, noted that the first such sharpback identified was taken from the Labadie Bank off the southwest coast in May 1935.

A second was recorded off Sybil Head, Co Kerry, in June 1967, according to a paper by Quigley and Flannery in the Irish Naturalists’ Journa l. It would be another 21 years before a third was caught, in 1988 off Ballydavid, Co Kerry, and was donated to the National Museum of Ireland.

Ms Ní Churraidhín has also been presented with an oversized or “monster” mackerel (Scomber scombrus) which was caught by Kevin Dowd and Darren O’Sullivan of the Star of Hope .

The 1.3kg mackerel is about 50cm in length, and is among the dozen largest mackerel on record here.
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25880
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 21-02-2012 19:28    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rare lesser scaup duck makes its home on Newquay lake
21 February 2012 Last updated at 11:34

[video]

Bird-watchers from the south west have headed to a Cornish duck pond in the hope of spotting a rare duck.
The lesser scaup is a regular visitor to Hawaii but one has turned up on a boating lake in Newquay.

Birdwatcher, John Chaple, said: "This duck has found its home on Newquay boating lake, unbelievably, because it is such a small place. You'd think a wild duck would get spooked and be off in no time."
The duck can dive for up to 25 seconds and swim underwater for 15-18 metres (50-60 ft).

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-17111428
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 21071
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 23-02-2012 13:24    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Venomous banana spider in Edinburgh Asda supermarket
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-17139423

The spider had been curled round a banana in a box

A venomous spider from Colombia has been found in a bunch of bananas by an Edinburgh shop worker.

The wandering spider, commonly known as a banana spider, was spotted crawling out of the fruit in Asda's Chesser branch on Tuesday.

A shop worker caught the female arachnid in a plastic jar before calling the Scottish SPCA.

The spider, with a 10cm leg span, was taken to the Edinburgh Butterfly and Insect World where it later died.

Shop worker, Petra Merriman, 45, caught the spider.

Continue reading the main story

Start Quote

All the boys were running round like headless chickens”

Petra Merriman
Asda
She said her male colleagues had been "in panic" after discovering the spider.

She said: "All the boys were running round like headless chickens.

"One of the chaps who was putting a box of bananas in the display took a lid off a box and saw it was curled around a banana.

"We got a phone call in the back office saying come and deal with this spider.

"The guys all said 'I'm not going.' I said I would. I'm not arachnophobic at all."

'Shutting down'
She added: "I brought a pot with a secure lid down with me, and I just popped it in.

"I didn't have to touch it, I just put the pot underneath it.

"Nothing like this has ever happened here before."

Kevin Thom, of Edinburgh Butterfly and Insect World, said: "It isn't deadly but its venom contains high levels of serotonin.

"If bitten you would experience pain, swelling, muscle spasms and flu-like symptoms which could be very unpleasant, depending on the amount of venom that was injected.

"These spiders can survive transport from abroad by shutting down and becoming very cold.

"They awaken when they warm up, which is often under bright shop lights.

"This female has possibly suffered shock in transit or it may simply have been her time to die."
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 21071
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 12-03-2012 20:19    Post subject: Reply with quote

Vid at link.

Quote:
Village overrun by peacocks 'with attitude'
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-17270980

6 March 2012 Last updated at 11:03 GMT

Feathers have been ruffled in the normally sleepy Stirlingshire village of Gargunnock.

Residents have taken up water pistols after a flock of peacocks set up home in the village and began rampaging through their gardens.

It is thought a pair of birds escaped from an estate and have grown in numbers since then.
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 21071
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 16-03-2012 01:44    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bit off its home surf alright. Love to see it.

Quote:
Rare sighting of albatross off southwest coast
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2012/0315/1224313320305.html
LORNA SIGGINS

Thu, Mar 15, 2012

Birdwatch Ireland says a recent sighting of a black-browed albatross by Irish marine scientists is “very rare”. The bird, normally found in the Southern Ocean, was sighted off the southwest Irish coast by staff and students from Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology during a trip on the State research vessel Celtic Explorer.

The group was among 20 scientists from both sides of the Border and Scotland who have recently returned from an offshore survey of whales, dolphins, seabirds and plankton.

The black-browed albatross or “Mollymawk” ( Thalassarche melanophrys ) is a large marine bird which gets its name from its dark eye-stripe. Birdwatch Ireland development officer Niall Hatch said the species had been spotted from headlands here several times before, a long way from its habitat in the southern hemisphere.

The Celtic Explorer research trip was led by institute researcher Dr Joanne O’Brien and PhD student Conor Ryan
Back to top
View user's profile 
AnalisOffline
Great Old One
Joined: 12 Apr 2006
Total posts: 950
Gender: Unknown
PostPosted: 24-04-2012 15:13    Post subject: Reply with quote

One more unexpected encounter with a python in the Alps recently.

http://www.ledauphine.com/savoie/2012/03/24/ils-ont-trouve-un-python-d-un-metre-vingt-dans-leur-couloir-a-leur-reveil
Quote:

25/3/2012 06:02

They found a 1,2 meter long exotic snake after they woke up.

These young parents of a very young child won't forget this unexpected encounter in the midtown of Albertville, rue de la République.
Yesterday morning, shortly before 7:00, they got up to take care of their baby. But in a corridor, their attention was caught by the door leading to their electric meter. It should have been closed, but was open. The young man came into the cubbyhole and found suddenly himself facing a big coiled snake. "What a shock !", the young woman tells us. "It was staring at us, but was remaining quiet, not threatening at all."
The couple called the firefighters of the town, and took a shot of their guest. Having experience with this kind of intervention (but usually for vipers and rat snakes), the firefighters used a hook to catch the snake and put it in a bag, before a specialized firefighter came from Chambéry to retrieve it.
At first sight, it seems it was a pet, a yellow-orange albinos python molurus, that likely fled from its owner and crawled through ducts or vents to reach the hall of the couple's flat. Leaving them astounded. Especially as it was almost 1.2 meter long.
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 21071
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 23-05-2012 23:56    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Wild pigs threaten crops in Strathnairn, councillor says
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-18164358

Wild boar can be farmed under licence, but it is illegal to release them into the wild

Related Stories

Feral wild boar seen in gardens

Free-roaming wild pigs threaten to damage crops in a part of the Highlands, a councillor has warned.

Believed to be a mix of wild boar and domestic pig that escaped from a farm, the animals have been spotted in the Strathnairn area near Inverness.

Local councillor Roddy Balfour said there were worries they will dig up potato crops.

Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) has offered to advise farmers and households worried about the pigs.

Mr Balfour, councillor for Culloden and Ardersier, told BBC Alba: "If planted potatoes are being torn out it is going to create havoc in the community.

"Particularly at this time of the year when you are making a late start to the season and everything is now going well."

Continue reading the main story
Where the wild things are


Boar are not the only unusual animal to have been found in the Highlands and Islands
In 1980, a puma was captured at Cannich, Inverness-shire. It was taken to the Highland Wildlife Park, at Kincraig. Nicknamed Felicity, it spent five years at the park. After the cat died it was stuffed and is on display at Inverness Museum
A dead wallaby was found on Islay in 2004
In April 2008, a dead beaver was discovered on a beach at Eathie, on the Black Isle
Police probed reports of a big cat attacking and killing sheep in Sutherland in June 2011
Mr Balfour said it was unlikely the pigs would be a threat to people's safety, but added that people might feel uncomfortable being close to them.

He said: "People are not going to enjoy their barbecues when there is a boar circling the garden fence."

Last year, feral wild boar were spotted searching for food in the gardens of homes in Invermoriston, near Loch Ness.

Residents have told the Highland News of seeing the pigs on their properties and nearby roads.

Trees for Life told BBC Scotland that the animals were not linked to a group it released on its nearby Dundreggan Estate in 2009.

The Forres-based charity said it was told of feral wild boar being seen around Invermoriston in August 2010.

In 2002, police were involved in efforts to catch a wild boar roaming between Newtonmore and Laggan. It was later shot by a local landowner.

Wild boar can be farmed under licence, but it is illegal to release them into the wild.

Groups of feral wild boar are found elsewhere in the UK, according to the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra).

It said between 100 and 200 were estimated to be in Kent and East Sussex and about 20 to 30 in west Dorset.
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 21071
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 24-05-2012 11:52    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Warning over deep-ocean stowaways

Bhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-18180928y Jonathan Amos
Science correspondent, BBC News

The famous Alvin submersible has been operating for nearly 50 years

Related Stories

Scrutiny for fjord rock disposal
Cayman vents are world's hottest
'The Hoff' crab is new ocean find

Care must be taken not to spread deep-sea creatures around the world during exploration of the remote ocean floor.

Scientists using the famous Alvin sub say the vehicle picked up limpets from a depth of almost 3,000m and inadvertently transferred them alive to another location more than 600km away.

It is surprising because the animals had to cope with huge pressure changes as Alvin conducted its dives.

The researchers report the event in the journal Conservation Biology.

Spreading organisms artificially beyond their range in this way could have damaging effects on marine ecosystems, they warn, either by introducing competitors or even disease.

The team urges other deep-sea explorers to exercise extreme caution, and to assume hardy stowaways could be hanging on to their vehicles.

The curious case of the limpets is described by Janet Voight, from the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago.

She and colleagues were studying lifeforms living around hydrothermal vents off the north-west coast of the United States.

Such vents are among the key study targets of modern oceanographic science - places where amazing collections of animals and other organisms thrive in mineral-rich, hot waters that gush up from volcanic cracks in the seabed.


The limpets are known to be hardy creatures

Indeed, it was Alvin that first discovered these ecosystems in 1977.

On one dive to a depth of 2.7km on the Gorda Ridge, the team gathered various specimens with the submersible's sampling tools.

The group then climbed back up the water column and moved Alvin, via its support ship, to a new dive location 600km to the north, on the Juan De Fuca Ridge, to take yet more specimens.

When the scientists examined their haul back in the lab, they found examples of a limpet (Lepetodrilus gordensis) thought to live only on the Gorda Ridge existing also on the Juan De Fuca Ridge. The team thought it had discovered an entirely new population.

But doubts started to creep in when the researchers realised conditions at the second site could not have met the limpets' nutritional requirements.

Chemical analysis then confirmed the two populations were in fact one - Alvin, despite being cleaned en route to the second dive, had carried stowaways in its sampling gear.

"It remains a mystery, but we suspect we didn't fully clean the suction sampler," Dr Voight told BBC News.


HYDROTHERMAL VENT SYSTEMS

Existence of vent systems was first established in 1977 off the Galapagos Islands
Have since been seen at many volcanic sites, down to 5,000m (above) at Mid-Cayman Rise
Water drawn through sea floor cracks is superheated and ejected through vent openings
Hot fluid carries dissolved metals and other chemicals from beneath ocean floor
Vent systems support an extraordinary array of microbial and animal lifeforms
Beyond the reach of sunlight, ecosystems depend on chemosynthesis, not photosynthesis

"Perhaps they were in a little crack somewhere. The hose on the suction sampler looks much like the hose on your vacuum cleaner, and perhaps they were hiding in the corrugations. We were late coming up from the dive and it was a bit dark - maybe they just weren't seen.

"Lepetodrilus are incredibly tough, but there are others animals also from the deep sea that seem to do well when brought up to sea-level pressure - at least for a few days."

Invasive species are one of the biggest problems in conservation today; introducing something new to an ecosystem can have devastating consequences.

So, for the team to discover it was responsible for the contamination is a matter of some embarrassment. But Dr Voight says the experience is a wake-up call to everyone working in the deep ocean.

"Hydrothermal vents are the most extreme, specialised habitats you can get - they spew out acidic, metal-rich fluids. And we could be messing with them without even knowing about it," Dr Voight said.

"We were a biology cruise and so we should have been the most sensitive to this, but there are geology-focused cruises out there who might not even be aware of this potential.

"By publishing this - although it's painful to admit errors - we want to make the point that this is something that needs to be taken seriously."

Jonathan.Amos-INTERNET@bbc.co.uk and follow me on Twitter
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25880
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 31-05-2012 20:05    Post subject: Reply with quote

As this is supposed to be a 'first', I guess it belongs here. (However, Little Egrets have been breeding in the UK for years.)

Great white egrets breed in UK for first time
By Ben Aviss, Reporter, BBC Nature

Great white egrets are breeding in the UK for the first time at a Somerset nature reserve.
At least one chick has hatched at Shapwick Heath National Nature Reserve, it has been confirmed, setting a new UK breeding bird record.

To have the egrets, a species of heron and rare visitors to the UK, breeding in the country was "incredibly exciting", manager Simon Clarke said.
There have also been unconfirmed sightings of a second chick.
"It was a great sense of relief when we confirmed we have got at least one chick on the nest," Mr Clarke told BBC Nature.
"We've been on tenterhooks like expectant parents ourselves.
"To have this bird successfully hatch here is just brilliant," he said.

Volunteers at the Natural England site who have been helping with 24-hour monitoring of the nest, believed they saw wing flapping and a quick glimpse of a yellow bill on Tuesday night.

On Wednesday morning, Kevin Anderson, great white egret project coordinator for Natural England, provided "100% definite confirmation when he saw it flapping its wings after a feed from the parent," Mr Clarke said.
"The chick already looks the size of a little egret, is looking healthy, and there are lots of feeding flights from the parents.
"It's looking good."

Recent unconfirmed sightings of a second chick would not be unusual, as great white egrets can lay up to six eggs, one at a time, over a period of a few days.
The eggs then hatch over a similar period, depending on the day they were laid.
Mr Clarke is hoping to confirm more chicks: "We're just waiting to see how many more turn up."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/18280491
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25880
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 31-05-2012 20:25    Post subject: Reply with quote

Risso's dolphin stranded on Perranporth beach is rescued

A dolphin which was stranded overnight on a beach in Cornwall has been rescued.
The mammal - a Risso's dolphin - is thought to have beached at Perranporth in the early hours.
Members of the British Divers Marine Life Rescue (BDMLR) worked with a vet to help the 2.7m (9ft) dolphin.
The animal was returned to the sea after the vet said it had no obvious signs of injury or disease and could be "refloated" safely.

Stephen Marsh, BDMLR's operation manager, said there was a healthy population of Risso's dolphins in the Bay of Biscay and off the Hebrides in Scotland.
"We think it probably beached about 1am at the turn of the tide - but we've no idea why it stranded," he said.
"Risso's are deep water specialists and when one is found on a beach, it usually means something's wrong."

Mr Marsh said after the attending vet confirmed the Risso's dolphin was a "good candidate for refloat" it was carried into the water on a pontoon system to give it good support.
"A few minutes later, the dolphin itself decided it was ready to swim away and although initially doing so parallel to the beach, turned and headed directly out to sea," he said.
Mr Marsh said the dolphin appeared to be swimming strongly.

Risso's can grow up to about 4m (13ft) long and normally travel in pods of up to 50.
Although generally found in deep waters, rather than close to land, Risso's have been sighted off Devon and Cornwall before.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-18277523
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 21071
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 01-06-2012 20:28    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Bear may have hopped train into Bakersfield
http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2012/06/bakersfield-bear-graduation-train.html
June 1, 2012 | 5:00 am

A 200-pound black bear that hopped a fence into an elementary school playground in Bakersfield may have arrived by train, according to one animal control official.

The youthful ursine appeared Thursday morning in the Ramon Garza Elementary School parking lot, and created a spectacle for parents at the middle school next door who were gathered for a graduation ceremony. As the bear moved toward Garza’s chain-link fence, school administrators had to evacuate about 75-elementary school students from the playground.

Kern County Animal Control spokeswoman Kim Rodriguez and other officials expressed surprise Thursday that a bear could have ventured that far into northeastern Bakersfield.

“He could have hopped on a train that comes out of the hills,” Rodriguez said. “Where he was at, he would have had to cross several busy streets.... I just have hard time believing this bear strolled through a busy street.”

Rodriguez said the bear removal went “very smoothly,” as animal control officials worked with sheriff’s deputies and the public to help track the bear down. She said “people got on their balconies and pointed to where the bear was going” as authorities tracked the bear to an apartment complex. They tased, but did not tranquilize, the bear and then loaded it into a truck.

Janice Mackey, an information officer for California Fish and Game, agreed that bears have rarely ventured that far inland, but some have been spotted on the outskirts of the city. She said that 25 years ago, a bear could have wandered into the area without harm. But Thursday there were hundreds of people in and around the two school campuses, forcing authorities into action. Officials said the bear was scooped up about 30 minutes from the time the first spotting was reported.

“Animal Control subdued the bear, put it in truck, and transported it to a more suitable habitat,” Mackey said.

“The bear will probably never come back again.”
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 21071
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 03-06-2012 13:07    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Pine marten sightings in Wales investigated
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-18267013

Pine martens are thought to exist in parts of Wales, including Snowdonia and areas near Aberystwyth

Related Stories

Pine marten fear for capercaillie
Pine marten enjoys sweet treat Watch
Cameras track 'elusive' mammals

Reported sightings of pine martens - a creature thought to be extinct in Wales - are being investigated.

The animal, part of the weasel family, was once common in the UK, but persecution and a loss of habitat led to its decline.

The Vincent Wildlife Trust (VWT) has received more than 40 unconfirmed sightings of pine martens, one of the UK's rarest animals, in the past week.

The VWT's work was touched on by BBC's Springwatch earlier this week.

Pine martens are about the size of a domestic cat, and are a protected species.

The BBC's Springwatch, which is based at Ynys Hir Nature Reserve in Ceredigion, has been following up sightings of the animal.

The VWT said it was going through reports of 50 sightings, 40 of them in Wales, in light of the programme's coverage of the animal.

Continue reading the main story

Start Quote

We've no idea how many there are in Wales, but there is evidence they are persisting in small parts of Wales”

Lizzie Croose
The Vincent Wildlife Trust

The trust said pine marten numbers had grown in Scotland in recent years, but they had not recovered in Wales and England.

But it believes the animal does exist in Wales in Snowdonia, the Cambrian Mountains, in areas around Aberystwyth, and parts of Carmarthenshire.

The VWT's Lizzie Croose said research by the People's Trust for Endangered Species in the 1990s concluded that the pine marten was extinct in Wales.

"We've been working on pine martens in England, Wales and Scotland for about 15 years," she said.

"More recently, we've been working on a project called mammals in a sustainable environment, which has been examining why they are not recovering in Wales like they are in Scotland.


Pine martens were thought to be extinct in Wales

"We've no idea how many there are in Wales, but there is evidence they are persisting in small parts of Wales.

"Research by the People's Trust for Endangered Species in the 1990s couldn't find evidence of pine martens in Wales and declared them extinct in the country."

Ms Croose said the trust collected sightings of the animals and, over the years, had looked for droppings in the countryside.

"The last time we found pine marten droppings was in the Rheidol Valley, near Aberystwyth, in 2007," she said.

"We've had reports of a few sightings in the area around Aberystwyth and in parts of Snowdonia and Carmarthenshire."

'Kill game birds'

Ms Croose said there could be a few reasons why the animals were not recovering in Wales.

"It might be that numbers are so low in Wales that pine martens are not meeting to breed," she added.

"Perhaps the high level of fox numbers, (which attack pine martens), could be having an impact. There is research to show that pine martins have a similar diet to foxes and are attacked by foxes because of competition for food.

"Habitat destruction over the years could have also played a part, while years ago pine martens were persecuted because they were known to kill game birds and take their eggs. They were also killed for their fur."
Back to top
View user's profile 
oldroverOffline
Great Old One
Joined: 18 Oct 2009
Total posts: 2227
Location: Wales
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 03-06-2012 20:02    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
in Wales that pine martens are not meeting to breed," she added
.

That makes sense to me, I live in the same habitat and I'm in the same boat.

I'd love to believe this, and there's been talk about it for years. No solid evidence yet though that I'm aware of, but not the maddest hope to have either.
Back to top
View user's profile 
amyasleighOffline
Great Old One
Joined: 03 Nov 2009
Total posts: 472
Gender: Unknown
PostPosted: 04-06-2012 18:39    Post subject: Reply with quote

If I'm right, Wales is the British great stronghold of the polecat -- the pine marten's fellow-rare-in-Britain mustelid.

I presume, and hope, that polecats and pine martens are too far apart taxonomically, to interbreed; but one hears numerous rather surprising and alarming "threatened extinction by interbreeding" stories nowadays.

On a different tack -- on the "Red Squirrels" thread on this sub-forum, a post by rynner on p4 there, mentions a scenario of a pine-marten presence being good for red squirrels in Britain, threatened by the invading bigger and tougher grey squirrel. One learns that the pine marten concentrates on preying on the grey squirrel, which mainly forages for food on the forest floor. The red squirrel mostly doesn't -- does its thing in the tree-tops: there, it's faster and lighter than the pine marten, which has a poor chance of catching red squirrels.

As a partisan of our native "reds" -- I'd say, in regions where they still exist at all: bring on the pine martens !
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 21071
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 04-06-2012 19:12    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
'Wallaby' on loose in Dungannon
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-18324716

A creature, which looks like a wallaby, has been discovered near Dungannon

Mystery surrounds the appearance of this little fellow in a field in County Tyrone.

He looks like a wallaby - which is used to much warmer temperatures - but seems right at home in the grass in Brantry near Eglish.

The little creature has created quite a bit of a stir among passers-by.

Many people have been stopping to have a look - but no one knows just how he managed to make it from Oz to his new surroundings.
[/img]
Back to top
View user's profile 
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Fortean Times Message Board Forum Index -> Cryptozoology - general All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 30, 31, 32 ... 40, 41, 42  Next
Page 31 of 42

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group