Forums

 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages 
Out of place animals
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 38, 39, 40, 41, 42  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Fortean Times Message Board Forum Index -> Cryptozoology - general
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
ramonmercadoOnline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 20741
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 08-11-2013 23:25    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Essex girl wakes to find fox on her bed
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-essex-24865120

Jessica Lambert's parents at first thought she was "dreaming" when she reported the visiting fox

An 11-year-old girl awoke in the middle of the night to find a fox asleep on her bed.

Jessica Lambert, who was in her downstairs bedroom, stroked the animal before going to her parents' room to tell them about the visitor.

Her father, Simon, went downstairs to find the fox cowering in the pantry of their West Mersea home in Essex.

Her mother Charlotte said: "It's scary. If it had woken my other children they would have screamed."

'Loves animals'
The fox got into the house via the cat-flap at about 01:00 GMT on Tuesday and went unnoticed at first by Roxy, the family's Yorkshire terrier/Jack Russell cross.

Continue reading the main story
Fox facts

Red foxes have overtaken grey wolves as the most widespread canines in the wild
Distributed throughout the northern hemisphere, red foxes are highly adaptable and occupy territories in deserts and tundra as well as urban areas
There are 45 subspecies and several colour morphs of red fox
As well excellent vision, smell and touch the bushy-tailed true fox can produce 28 different calls
Source: BBC Nature
"Jessica came in and said there was a fox in her bed," said Mrs Lambert, who runs Island Paddle Boarding with her husband. "She said she had been stroking it.

"Jessica absolutely loves animals. We thought she was dreaming.

"My husband managed to get it out of the house. Jessica was so pleased that she managed to stroke it."

The family said a number of people on the island left food out for foxes and it is thought that has made them less afraid of humans.

RSPCA spokeswoman Klare Kennett said: "It is unusual for foxes to come into houses as they are generally shy creatures and avoid human contact.

"Like most wild animals, they are attracted by food and that is usually the lure - pet food left out in bowls for instance.

"The advice to anyone finding any wild animal in their house is to open the doors and gently chase the animal out into the garden."


Edit to fix link.


Last edited by ramonmercado on 09-11-2013 00:23; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25326
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 08-11-2013 23:35    Post subject: Reply with quote

ramonmercado wrote:
Quote:
Essex girl wakes to find fox on her bed
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-24852139

I think you've got the wrong URL there!
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOnline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 20741
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 09-11-2013 00:22    Post subject: Reply with quote

Funny that! I never even went to the cemetery sign story.

right one http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-essex-24865120
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25326
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 10-11-2013 12:55    Post subject: Reply with quote

[video]
Wild boars wreck Forest of Dean football club pitch
By Karen Fazackerley, BBC Sport

Wild boars have caused havoc at the home ground of a non-league football club by tearing up the pitch twice in the space of one week.
Gloucester Northern Senior League side Soudley AFC is on the edge of the Forest of Dean and the club estimate the damage will cost more than £1,000.
It is now the third time the club have been hit with the troublesome boars.

"Our groundsman reckons it could be up until Christmas until the pitch is fit again," said club chairman Ian Marfell.
"We had a call from the local groundsman and he said the boars had been on and that it had been torn up pretty bad. So after work on Monday we went down and had a look and the pitch was in a terrible state. It was in a horrible mess.
"More have snuck back in since, after we'd done a lot of work to sort the damage the first time."
Five years ago the club had to contend with the same problem but the damage was less severe.

"There was a boar expert down there the other day and he said they are creatures of habit. Because it's a cut field, they like it better so they get the worms and grubs and things like that," Marfell told BBC Sport. "They just like to get in the[re] quickly and dig up what they are looking for."

Soudley are currently 13th in Division Two having won two of their nine matches, but the club have received offers of help from local teams, including league rivals Viney St Swithins.
"We've had offers of help from other clubs if we need to and our first team can try and reverse fixtures. But our reserve team, who play in the North Gloucestershire League, have their fixtures released monthly, so the league can give us away games up until Christmas."

The club, whose players pay £5 to play per week, understand the nature of being surrounded by the Forest and Marfell concedes that "it could have happened to any club around here, but we're the unlucky ones this time.
"The players will go down and do as much as they can to fix it. It's been regarded as one of the best pitches in the Forest of Dean over the past 10 years so to see it churned up is a bit of a pain."

It is not the first time an animal has decided to interrupt sport.
In February 2012, a cat became the star attraction when it ran onto the Anfield pitch as Liverpool played out a goalless draw against Tottenham.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/football/24887864
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25326
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 21-11-2013 10:21    Post subject: Reply with quote

Puffin found outside Kent post office released back into the wild

A young puffin found on a pavement outside a post office in Kent has been released into the wild after being nursed back to health by the RSPCA.
The bird was spotted by a man in Strood on 11 November and taken to a local vet before being transferred to the RSPCA's Mallydams Wood in East Sussex.

Manager Bel Deering said the puffin, nicknamed Pat, had been "rather weak and wobbly" but had no injuries.
It was released back out to sea on the high tide at Pett Level beach.

Ms Deering said it had been fed a diet of fresh sand eels and sprats, and was given regular dips in the centre's pool.
She said it was a "bit of a mystery how it ended up sickly and stranded in Strood" and that the pavement outside a post office was "an unusual habitat for a puffin".
"As puffins are normally found further north than Medway, Pat is an exceptional admission for us and has raised a lot of interest among staff and volunteers," she said.

An RSPCA spokesman added that the puffin had been "nicknamed Pat after the world's favourite postman".

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-25023900

I can't pin down Mallydams Wood on the map;
Quote:
In 2013 the Society had four wildlife centres at East Winch (Norfolk), West Hatch (Somerset), Stapeley Grange (Cheshire) and Mallydams Wood (East Sussex), which provide treatment to sick, injured and orphaned wild animals to maximise their chances of a successful return to the wild.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Society_for_the_Prevention_of_Cruelty_to_Animals


Pett Level beach is on the Sussex coast, east of Hastings, ie the coast of the English Channel. Which is a long way from Puffin country...
Quote:
These are pelagic seabirds that feed primarily by diving in the water. They breed in large colonies on coastal cliffs or offshore islands, nesting in crevices among rocks or in burrows in the soil.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puffin

The puffin colonies I know of are on Lundy, and Skomer off SW Wales. Scotland has colonies on St Kilda, and Isle of May, Firth of Forth. NE England has colonies on the Farne Islands, But all these places are a long way from Kent!
Back to top
View user's profile 
skinnyOffline
Roaring Fortean
Joined: 30 May 2010
Total posts: 476
Location: Adelaide
Age: 43
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 23-01-2014 11:38    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are deer farms about the place in many parts of Australia. However, the last thing I expected to see cantering across the road at the top of Mt Lofty on my way home yesterday was a dainty little doe and her wee fawn following on her heels. Scampered out of the native bush on one side of the road and disappeared into the same on the other side. Talk about a double take. Perhaps they were stolen from a farm and released on the mountain. Perhaps they were escaped pets (legal?).

Come to think of it, I'm sure border protection would be very interested to know about it. Free roaming deer would be a quarantine risk for sure.
Back to top
View user's profile 
skinnyOffline
Roaring Fortean
Joined: 30 May 2010
Total posts: 476
Location: Adelaide
Age: 43
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 23-01-2014 11:47    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well I'll be buggered.

Biosecurity SA reports that feral deer numbers are on the rise in the Mt Lofty Ranges

Quote:
All six species have established feral populations throughout the more temperate parts of South Australia, however currently only fallow deer and red deer are in substantial numbers, especially in the Upper South East and Mt Lofty Ranges. In the case of fallow deer, some of these herds are the remnants of long standing herds that were established over 100 years ago.

Deer are farmed as a commercial animal but are more difficult to contain than other livestock species and escapes are a common occurrence where fencing is substandard and/or management is poor. Escaped farmed deer readily adapt to life in remnant scrub and contribute substantially to long-standing wild populations. Natural Resource Management Board officers conduct regular fence inspections on deer farms to minimise the risk of escapes.
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOnline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 20741
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 04-02-2014 00:56    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Bristol police hunt for crocodile under bridge
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-bristol-26021763

File picture of an estuarine crocodile, better known as the saltwater or saltie, in the Adelaide river near Darwin in Australia's Northern Territory

Crocodiles tend to congregate in the rivers and swamps of Africa and Australia

Police were called out to search for a 6ft (1.8m) crocodile reportedly seen on the loose in Bristol.

Avon and Somerset Police Chief Constable Nick Gargan said on Twitter that a bus driver had alerted police about the animal earlier.

"One of our officers was flagged down by a bus driver today, claiming to have seen a 6ft crocodile... We can't find it," he said.

A police spokesman confirmed officers had been sent to look for the creature.

Chief constable crocodile tweet
Chief Constable Nick Gargan revealed the crocodile hunt on Twitter
The force did not reveal details of the extent of the search - or indicate how seriously they were taking the sighting.

"We were called at 10:28am on Monday, February 3, to reports of a crocodile sighted on Bedminster Bridge," the spokesman said.

"We carried out a search of the area but found no trace of the reptile."

Crocodiles tend to congregate in the slow-moving rivers and swamps of Africa, Asia, Australia and the Americas, according to BBC Nature.

A previous sighting of a crocodile in British waters - reported in the English Channel - turned out to be a piece of wood.
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25326
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 06-02-2014 09:55    Post subject: Reply with quote

Puffin saved after washing up on Gyllyngvase Beach
8:50am Thursday 6th February 2014

A puffin believed to have washed from the Scilly Isles has been saved by a couple after washing up on Gyllyngvase Beach.
Mark Agnew, manager of the Gylly Beach Cafe, and his girlfriend Cha[r]lotte Lodey, were outside the restaurant at around 9.30pm on Tuesday night when they spotted the bird struggling in the surf.

Mark, who lives in the building, said: "I came down to check on the café and Charlotte came down to give me a hand and to look at the sea."
Charlotte continued: "I saw it out of the corner of my eye, it was dragging itself up the beach with its wings, it was so weak.
"It looked like a bird that was drowning, the tide was washing over it."

When she went to pick it up it appeared fairly lifeless, and didn't move or struggle much.
The pair put the bird, tentatively named Puffy, in a box to "de-stress", and in the morning it appeared slightly recovered and was fed fresh cuts of fish from the café kitchen.
Charlotte said: "He's definitely perked up a bit since the fish." Smile

They had intended to release it, but after calling Mousehole Bird Hospital they were told to feed it some sugared fish and to try and release it tomorrow, as if it was not trying to escape then it was probably not ready.

Mark believes it's "more than likely" the puffin washed over from the Isles of Scilly, "Mousehole said that it's really rare to see a puffin this time of year."

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/fpfalmouth/10989194.Puffin_saved_after_washing_up_on_Gyllyngvase_Beach/

Probably an unwilling Rider of the Storm... I reckon it's better off in a box until the weather improves. Makes you wonder how many other creatures the storms have killed. There have been reports of seals and dolphins thrown ashore too.

EDIT:

Seals hospitalised in Gweek with broken jaws due to storms

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/10988353.Seals_hospitalised_in_Gweek_with_broken_jaws_due_to_storms/?ref=mr
Back to top
View user's profile 
Bullseye_v2_0Offline
Grey
Joined: 07 Aug 2012
Total posts: 12
Gender: Unknown
PostPosted: 11-02-2014 07:13    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quite a few puffins (mostly dead) have been washed up on the Sussex coast. Storms doing a lot of damage to wildlife as well as property.
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOnline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 20741
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 18-02-2014 15:14    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Chicago goes to war with Asian carp
Pallab Ghosh
By Pallab Ghosh
Science correspondent, BBC News, Chicago
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-26017956

Asian carp

The fear is that Asian carp could completely overrun high-value fisheries such as salmon

The US city of Chicago is considering drastic measures to prevent giant fish infesting North America's Great Lakes.

Authorities are thinking of blocking the city's canal system to stop Asian carp entering Lake Michigan.

Such a move could cost up to $18bn (£11bn) and cause huge economic disruption to the city.

Cheaper options are also being examined, including making burgers out of the fish and eating them to extinction.

This species of carp, as the name suggests, is native to the Far East.

They were originally introduced to southern US states more than three decades ago to control algal build-up in sewage treatment plants. But they escaped into the Mississippi River and proliferated, making their way north towards the Great Lakes.

More than a metre in length, they have displaced indigenous fish species along the way.

Technological solutions
Dozens of them will often leap out of the water as boats approach.

A local environmental campaigner, Michael Beecham, told a public consultation on the issue about his experience of this frightening spectacle.

"I've gone down the river and had these fish jump up and hit me in the face. It is a big problem for our natural species," he said.

Great lakes
The meeting was organised by the US Army Corps of Engineers, which has been asked by Congress and the White House to come up with a technological solution to the carp problem.

Its study has put forward several options, one of which involves blocking parts of Chicago's canal system. This might take 25 years to complete.

Col Frederick Drummond said that the issue had emotional as well as financial factors.

"I tell folks it's a very complex study. There are 9.1 million people in Chicago and over a period of 100 years that canal has been there and the economic impact is considerable."

Dinner proposal
Listening in at the meeting was John Goss, representing the White House, who was worried about the effect that having permanent barriers in the canal system would have on industry.

"It would certainly increase the cost of transportation," he told BBC News.

"It is currently very cheap and efficient to bring materials and finished goods down that Chicago ship canal. The steel industry, for example, depends on scrap metal by barge."

An Asian carp
The carp have worked their way up the Mississippi
Another cheaper option, not suggested by the Corps of Engineers report, is to eat the fish out of existence.

Dirk Fucik is selling carp burger at his specialist fish shop not far from downtown Chicago.

He tells me he thinks the carp are a great resource.

"To catch it and throw it away is a waste," he says. "Eating them helps solve the problem and also provides jobs."

Mr Fucik's burgers, mixed with lemon zest and pepper, did not taste bad at all. But the idea has not yet caught on. So far, he is the only person in the whole of Chicago selling carp burgers.


Pallab Ghosh went to see what Mr Fucik's carp burgers tasted like
International perspective
Although the Asian carp may appear to be an issue only for the US states and Canadian provinces, Roger Germann, of the Shedd Aquarium in Chicago, said the rest of the globe should also be concerned.

"Twenty per cent of the world's freshwater is in the Great Lakes, and from an economic standpoint it will affect shipping that folks in the UK and other parts of the world might rely on to get their goods and services here because they are going to cost more to transport."

Illinois and neighbouring states will have to find a solution soon. Many believe the fish are unstoppable and that it is only a matter of time before they make the Great Lakes their new home.

The carp problem was also being discussed in town at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Lake Michigan, Chicago

Lake Michigan is connected to the Mississippi River via an economically important canal system
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25326
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 27-02-2014 11:00    Post subject: Reply with quote

'First' sighting of wild beavers in England for centuries
[Video: A group of beavers have been seen in the English countryside in what is thought to be the first sighting of its kind in hundreds of years]
A family of wild beavers has been seen in the English countryside in what is thought to be the first sighting of its kind in centuries.
Three beavers have been filmed together on the River Otter in Devon.
Landowner David Lawrence is mystified about where the animals have come from.

A spokesman for the Department for Food, Environment and Rural Affairs said it was unlawful to release beavers in England and they were looking into what action to take.

A lone beaver was spotted on Mr Lawrence's farm in January and last July a woman claimed she saw a beaver on the River Otter.
But this is the first time anyone has reported a group of the animals on the river.
Environmentalist Tom Buckley filmed the beavers gnawing trees, grooming themselves and playing on the riverbank.

Steve Hussey from the Devon Wildlife Trust, said there was evidence that otters and beavers were sharing a waterway, for the first time in two or three hundred years.

"But this is not necessarily the way to go about having beavers reintroduced into the English countryside," he said.
"It would be better if it was done in a planned way, but now they are here we need to take a close look at the impact they have."

Mr Lawrence thinks the beavers could help reduce flooding on his land and improve water quality.
"We are quite happy for them to be here," he said.
"At some point we might have to go in and clear up some of the wood because it could wash on down to Tipton and cause a flooding problem down there."

Beavers were hunted to extinction in England and Wales during the 12th Century and disappeared from the rest of the UK 400 years later.
They were trapped for their fur and throat glands, which were believed to have medicinal properties.

Elsewhere in the county, two beavers have been kept in a secure and secret location in west Devon as part of a three-year experiment by the Devon Wildlife Trust to see if the animals can help restore wetland areas.
The pair are believed to have been to have been breeding after one kit was filmed last August.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-26365127
Back to top
View user's profile 
oldroverOffline
Great Old One
Joined: 18 Oct 2009
Total posts: 2327
Location: Wales
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 27-02-2014 17:43    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's the most interesting bit of cryptozoogy for years.
Back to top
View user's profile 
gncxxOffline
King-Size Canary
Joined: 25 Aug 2001
Total posts: 14800
Location: Eh?
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 27-02-2014 18:51    Post subject: Reply with quote

Haven't there been beavers released in Scotland over the past few years? Is it beyond the bounds of possibility to think these animals have taken a trip to Devon? After all, there may be more in points in between North and South.
Back to top
View user's profile 
oldroverOffline
Great Old One
Joined: 18 Oct 2009
Total posts: 2327
Location: Wales
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 27-02-2014 19:28    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Is it beyond the bounds of possibility to think these animals have taken a trip to Devon?


Yes, pretty much. It's too far, plus the fact that the numbers released in Scotland were small and are very closely monitored. There's no real way the population could have spread so far so fast.

Someone has introduced these. Which raises the question of are we going to see further instances of guerrilla re-wilding. The danger of this is as it's been illicitly is that there's no way to check if they're the right subspecies, are healthy, genetically suitable or whether they might be carrying something that'll harm the indigenous wildlife. Plus where the hell do you get knocked off beavers from?
Back to top
View user's profile 
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Fortean Times Message Board Forum Index -> Cryptozoology - general All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 38, 39, 40, 41, 42  Next
Page 39 of 42

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group