Forums

 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages 
Out of place animals
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 39, 40, 41, 42  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Fortean Times Message Board Forum Index -> Cryptozoology - general
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
gncxxOffline
King-Size Canary
Joined: 25 Aug 2001
Total posts: 14898
Location: Eh?
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 27-02-2014 19:32    Post subject: Reply with quote

Guerrilla beavering?! I'd be tempted to say the Devon ones were lifted from a sanctuary of sorts, if not in Scotland then elsewhere. I'm sure the nation's red squirrels have a warning for us about this kind of thing.
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25709
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 27-02-2014 23:56    Post subject: Reply with quote

Found: one beaver
24 January 2014

A mystery beaver sighted in Devon could be the first case of the wild animal in England for 800 years.
A rogue beaver has been spotted living on a farm near the River Otter in Devon, centuries after they went extinct in the UK.

Beavers used to be an important part of wetland ecosystems across Europe, but were heavily hunted for their fur and their throat glands, thought to be medicinal, disappearing from England and Wales in the twelfth century.

Countries across Europe have been reintroducing the beaver since the 1920s. Britain is one of the last regions to begin reintroduction, but there are now several controlled trial projects around Britain, including in Devon, Kent and Gloucestershire.

It’s a mystery, however, where the beaver caught on amateur video appeared from. The Devon Wildlife Trust is nearing the end of its three-year project to introduce a pair of beavers into an enclosed wetland area. The pair had a baby, known as a kit, in August 2013, but none of the three is reported missing.

Museum mammal curator Richard Sabin says beavers are remarkably good at escaping and surviving in the right environment, and that they can ‘gnaw out of pretty much anything’.

‘The beaver in Britain was, and still is, considered to be an important part of the ecosystem, and was certainly responsible for significant modifications to local and wider environments, through the damming of rivers since the end of the last ice age,’ said Sabin.

The Museum hosts the best collection of complete examples of the extinct indigenous British beaver. ‘Our specimens date back several hundred to several thousand years and were found as well-preserved skeletons in peat from fenlands in the east of England,’ said Sabin.

A beaver reintroduction trial is currently running in Scotland, where a total of 16 beavers have been released in the highlands since 2009. The Museum’s collection contributed data to the selection of candidates for the trial from living populations of Eurasian beavers.

The five-year project will come to an end this spring, after which a scientific report will be filed and the Scottish government will decide whether to continue the trial, remove the beavers entirely, or allow them to remain free on the land.

The Devon Wildlife Trust’s beaver trial is monitoring the impact the beavers have on the hydrology, biology and water chemistry of the wetland site. At the end of the trial, the beavers will be removed from the land until the results are interpreted.

http://www.nhm.ac.uk/about-us/news/2014/jan/found-one-beaver127609.html
Back to top
View user's profile 
amyasleighOffline
Great Old One
Joined: 03 Nov 2009
Total posts: 465
Gender: Unknown
PostPosted: 28-02-2014 18:10    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fascinating ! Beavers found living wild in the West Country, not as the result of any official and known re-introducing. Was prompted to refer to Google. Per the Wikipedia article on the Eurasian beaver (whilst one keeps in mind that Wiki is not necessarily omniscient), in the past fifteen years beavers have – as well as at those venues already mentioned in this thread – have been introduced (in [semi]-enclosed conditions) in a number of other sites in several widely separated parts of England, and Wales.

Of course, strictly-controlled sites would be aware of losing any of their complement. Find self wondering whether the hypothesised guerrilla reintroducers, perhaps smuggled in beavers from the European continent – maybe from the best European beaver countries outside of the former USSR: Germany, and Norway / Sweden, where the beaver population is in each case quite well up into the thousands.
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 21053
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 13-03-2014 12:45    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
'Urban' wolves threaten Italian towns
http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs/news_from_elsewhere/
News from Elsewhere...
...as found by BBC Monitoring
15:37 UK time, Wednesday, 12 March 2014

Italian farmers complain that wolves hunt their livestock

Italians are worried that wild wolves are becoming too comfortable making forays into towns and villages across the country, it seems.

The latest proof that the animals are getting dangerously close to humans came when a driver ran over a wolf near the northern city of Turin, Torino Today reports. In October, residents of a town in Italy's coastal region of Liguria said they saw a wolf roaming the streets in broad daylight, showing no signs that it was afraid of humans.

It is estimated that between 600 and 800 wolves live in the Italian peninsula. Although they are protected by EU law, farmers have started killing the animals, complaining that that they are increasingly hunting their livestock, according to another Italian website, The Local.

In January, farmers in Tuscany protested against what they saw as the inaction of local authorities by dumping the dead bodies of wolves in villages and towns across the central Italian region.

Use #NewsfromElsewhere to stay up-to-date with our reports via Twitter.
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 21053
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 19-03-2014 19:28    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Mystery Coningsby emu resists police 'arrest'
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-lincolnshire-26643529

Mystery emu with PC Gary Young at the animal shelter

Officers said the emu "wasn't best pleased" to see them and resisted capture

Two police officers were left chasing a mystery emu found in a garden before capturing it in their patrol car.

The bird was spotted in a garden in Coningsby, Lincolnshire, earlier and eventually cornered in a garage.

The two officers managed to grab the bird and it was then given a ride in their police car to a nearby animal park.

Shirley Morrell, owner of Tattershall Farm Park, said the emu had suffered "a bit of a trauma getting arrested".

Initial inquiries have failed to track down where the bird came from.

The owners of the bird, thought to be a rare white emu and relatively young, are being urged to come forward.

PC Tom Harrison, who chased the emu with PC Gary Young, said he had "learnt today that if you are trying to hold a bird like this, grab the legs first".

'Hoovering out the car'
He added: "It wasn't best pleased to see us and was even less happy to go into the car.

"It's not as big as an ostrich but it certainly felt as strong as one.

"We drove it to a nearby park and I had to hold it down, as humanely as possible, all the way.

"I then spent 10 minutes hoovering out the car as I couldn't hand it over to the next shift in that condition."

Ms Morrell said emus like this were "quite unusual so someone will be missing it".

"Unless of course it's a horror and they are glad to see the back of it," she added.

"It's had a bit of a trauma getting arrested so we will give it a chance to calm down before having a closer look."
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25709
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 26-03-2014 08:56    Post subject: Reply with quote

Common snapping turtle abandoned in Dartford street

An animal conservationist wants laws on the sale of some rare breeds to be tightened after rescuing a "dangerous" turtle abandoned in the street.
A common snapping turtle, native to North America, was found in a box at the roadside in Hawley Road, Dartford.
The reptile, which is about 14in (35cm) long, is being kept at Artisan Rare Breeds, a Dartford-based charity.

Director Wayne May wants the creatures licensed because of the danger they can pose in the wrong hands.
Mr May said: "It can remove a finger from a small child, and a fully-grown one could cause serious damage to your hand.
"Their head can reach the back of their shell. No gloves are needed [to handle it], but I'd highly recommend no touching unless it's completely necessary."

He suspects the turtle was bought legally as a pet but has outgrown its environment.
"You can buy them in a pet shop, but they are more a specialist keeper's reptile," he said.
"It will stay with us because you can't rehouse it."
He said no shops in Dartford sold the turtles, which are still quite rare in the UK.
"I personally think they should be licensed," he added.

The turtle is only the second Mr May has come across in the past 10 years, and he said he would like to see the UK follow the lead of some US states, which have banned them from being kept as pets.

He said they were relatively cheap to feed because "they eat absolutely anything" but that it had cost the charity about £250 to build an environment suitable for long-term housing.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-kent-26733049
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 21053
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 10-04-2014 23:18    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Crocodile Abandoned At Mall Needs A Home
AP
Posted: 04/10/2014 12:30 pm EDT Updated: 04/10/2014 12:59 pm EDT
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/10/crocodile-abandoned-at-mall-roseville_n_5125700.html

ROSEVILLE, Calif. (AP) — This is one crocodile that didn't want to become a handbag.

Police in the Sacramento suburb of Roseville captured a 4-foot-long crocodile Wednesday near a T.J. Maxx store in a strip mall.

Police spokeswoman Dee Dee Gunther says the animal apparently escaped from a box left in front of a reptile shop called The Serpentarium with a sign saying "Nile Crocodile. Contact Rescue."

Authorities say the crocodile is feisty but had duct tape wrapped around its jaws.

California Department of Fish and Wildlife Lt. Patrick Foy says the agency is "reasonably sure" the animal is indeed a Nile crocodile. It's looking for a zoo or other facility to take it.

Foy says the crocodile appears to have broken teeth, perhaps from biting wire cages.

California bans ownership of crocodiles.
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25709
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 11-04-2014 07:55    Post subject: Reply with quote

10 April 2014 Last updated at 14:12
Cushion starfish found for first time in Kimmeridge

A type of starfish has been discovered living in a rock pool at Kimmeridge Bay, Dorset, for the first time.
The tiny creature was found during a low tide beach exploration by Dorset Wildlife Trust.

Julie Hatcher, of the trust, said: "This delicate cushion starfish has never been recorded this far east in the UK."
Native to Portugal and the Mediterranean, it uses tiny feet to glide across the seabed.
The starfish has five equal length arms and is about 40mm in diameter.
Numbers are predicted to rise due to climate change.
In November the site between Broadbench to Kimmeridge Bay failed to make the government's list of Marine Conservation Zones (MCZ).

In January rare barnacle species were found among Dorset storm debris at Chesil Beach.
According to the trust, it was the first time the crustaceans, which are native to North America, the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico, had been recorded on land in the UK.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-dorset-26966995
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 21053
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 02-05-2014 21:45    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Scorpion discovered on London Underground passenger

The scorpion being cared for at London Zoo

A potentially dangerous scorpion has been discovered clinging to a passenger's bag at a central London Tube station.

He screamed when he saw the unusual traveller at Victoria station, alerting London Underground staff.

The animal was captured and placed in a plastic lunchbox, before the British Transport Police (BTP) were called.

London Zoo said the discovery was bizarre and the animal had been exposed to a "stressful situation".

Specialist wildlife crime officers from the BTP removed the venomous animal, which had been placed on a shelf in the station manager's office.

A scorpion similar to the one found on the Tube
The Centruroides genus of scorpion is potentially dangerous
PC Mike Charnick, from the BTP, said: "There is a surprisingly wide range of wildlife on and around the railway network but this is the first time I've come across a scorpion."

The officers took the scorpion to London Zoo, where it now lives.

PC Mike Charnick, BTP wildlife crime officer, and Dave Clarke, Bugs team leader at London Zoo
Transport police worked with London Zoo to house the scorpion
After being assessed by experts at the Natural History Museum, the animal was identified as a Centruroides, a potentially dangerous species which could have come from the Caribbean.

Dave Clarke, bugs team leader at London Zoo, said: "It is bizarre that this species was found in somewhere like Victoria station.

"The scorpion really is a beautiful animal and it's a shame that it has been exposed to such a stressful situation."

The passenger who discovered the animal, on 6 April, told staff he been in the park all day and had not travelled abroad recently.

However, he did not leave his contact details so officers have not been able to work out where he picked up the creature.
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-london-27252689
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25709
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 05-05-2014 18:30    Post subject: Reply with quote

World's biggest rodent seen on loose on Essex golf course
Golf players film a 4ft long rodent usually found in South America sniffing around their course in Essex
[Video]
By Emily Gosden
10:39AM BST 05 May 2014

First there was the runaway rhea seen roaming a Hertfordshire golf course. Now, it seems that putting greens and fairways have proved tempting refuge for another animal fugitive: a capybara.

The creature – the world’s largest rodent species – was filmed ambling around near the 8th tee at the North Weald Golf Club in Essex after apparently escaping from a fenced enclosure at nearby Ashlyns Farm Shop.

Like the rhea, the capybara is a native of South America – but unlike the 6ft bird, which is reputedly capable of disembowelling a man with a flick of its claws, the runaway rodent is not believed to be dangerous.
Described by bemused golfers as looking “like a cross between a beaver and a bear”, capybaras are in fact most closely related to the guinea pig, but dwarf them, growing to as long as four feet.

The creature was spotted at the Essex course on March 16 when, according to the club, “golfers approaching the 8th tee stumbled across something that looked quite out of place on the course”.
“Kevin & Barbara Walters and John & Pat Miles were about to play their tee shots when Kevin saw what he thought was a wild boar meandering around the pond. After a quick phone call to the clubhouse, Angus and Hamish arrived at the scene with cameras at the ready to capture the rare sight,” the club said in a statement on its website.
Another club member, Stefan Freeman was “next up on the tee” and identified it as a capybara.

Rob Dixon, manager at Ashlyns Farm Shop, confirmed it was “missing a capybara”.
He said the solitary male animal had been sighted since but attempts to catch it had so far proved unsuccessful. “We keep on trying to catch it, but as soon as we try and catch it, it’s moved on or it jumps in the river and shoots off. Next time we’ve got to get a vet out and try and tranquillise it,” he said.
“They run away from humans – they’re quite shy,” he added. “They’re not like a rat, they’re almost like a big hamster.”

Capybara owners in the UK include Lady McAlpine, who wrote last year that a capybara had gone missing from her Fawley Hill estate in Henley-on-Thames and “gone to swim in the Thames”.
Lady McAlpine, whose capybara has since returned, said that they were “tremendous escapologists”.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/wildlife/10808624/Capybara-found-on-Essex-golf-course.html
Back to top
View user's profile 
Pietro_Mercurios
Heuristically Challenged
Gender: Unknown
PostPosted: 10-05-2014 13:35    Post subject: Reply with quote

It gets more like Ballard's, The Drowned World, every day.

From the Independent:

Snakes capable of crushing small children invade Regent's Canal

There has been an increase in sightings of the Aesculupian around the canal in the last couple of months
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 21053
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 10-05-2014 13:39    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pietro_Mercurios wrote:
It gets more like Ballard's, The Drowned World, every day.

From the Independent:

Snakes capable of crushing small children invade Regent's Canal

There has been an increase in sightings of the Aesculupian around the canal in the last couple of months


Mum-of-three Sylvia Taylor, 33, told the Daily Star: "If they are capable of killing small animals then surely they could constrict small children?"

Mums of three interviewed by tabloids are leading experts on snakes.
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 21053
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 29-05-2014 19:02    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Asian relative of cane toad threatens Madagascar havoc

A relative of the cane toad, which has devastated wildlife in Australia, has invaded Madagascar, scientists report.

The Asian common toad was first seen on the island in March, and there have been several sightings since.

In a letter to the journal Nature, researchers warn that the arrival of the amphibian could cause "an ecological disaster" and wreak havoc on the country's unique fauna.

They say that urgent action is needed to remove the toads before they spread.

The fear is that the poisonous amphibians could poison local wildlife and carry diseases, such as the deadly chytrid fungus that has killed amphibians around the world.

One of the authors, Jonathan Kolby, of James Cook University in Queensland, Australia, said: "It's worrying because Madagascar has amazing endemic biodiversity - plants, animals and amphibians that are found nowhere else.

"And this one species has the propensity to damage that."

The amphibians were first seen in Toamasina, the main port of Madagascar. It is thought that they arrived in shipping containers from their native home in South East Asia.

"They are a very hardy and adaptable species," said Mr Kolby.

"They can handle a long ride on the ocean in a container, and then hop out wherever they end end up. And this is most likely how they got there."

The fear is that the warty brown creatures could repeat the damage that their relative, the cane toad (Rhinella marina), caused in Australia.

Cane toads, native to Central and South America, were introduced to Australia in the 1930s, initially to control pests, but they are now widespread and number in their millions.

They produce toxins that are deadly to the local birds, mammals and reptiles that prey on them and they have had a dramatic impact on the country's wildlife.

Asian common toads (Duttaphrynus melanostictus) are smaller than cane toads, but they are also venomous - and researchers think Madagascar's animals could be especially vulnerable.

"These animals have never been exposed to Asian toad toxins before and will likely not have an evolutionary defence against them," said Mr Kolby.

The 11 co-signatories of the letter add that the toads could outcompete other species and potentially spread the deadly chytrid fungus.

The researchers, from Australia, the US and Madagascar, say that conservationists and Madagascan government need to act quickly to eradicate the toads.

Mr Kolby said: "The question is, can we still eradicate them? Have we caught it soon enough that eradication could be a feasible option? Obviously we all hope the answer is yes.
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-27607978
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25709
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 02-06-2014 08:10    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hundreds flock to see rare short-toed eagle near Wareham

Hundreds of bird watchers have flocked to a nature reserve in Dorset after a rare short-toed eagle arrived there on Saturday.
About 700 people travelled to Morden Bog, near Wareham, over the weekend after the raptor was spotted by guide Paul Morton.
It is thought to be first sighting of the species on the British mainland.

The birds are common in central and southern Europe and have a wingspan of up to 6ft (190cm).
Short-toed eagles (circaetus gallicus) migrate from Africa in the spring and can live up to 30 years.
The only previous official UK sightings have been on the Isles of Scilly in 1999 and in Jersey in 2011.

Mr Morton, founder of Birds Of Poole Harbour education charity, discovered the bird sitting in a tree while he was taking a group of people for a guided tour of the reserve on Saturday morning.

He said it then stayed there until lunchtime when it flew off but then came back to the same tree at about 16:00 BST. It was still there on Sunday morning.
"I couldn't believe it," Mr Morton said.
"It's just extremely rare. You do not ever, ever expect to find one sat in a tree.
"I think it may have been migrating from southern Europe to central Europe and have been blown off course because of the easterly wind direction lately.
"It's what we call a second-calendar year bird. It would have hatched last year and has never migrated before and it's just got a bit lost.

"But where it's landed is just ideal for it. It feeds off lizards and snakes and this area is just stuffed full of those species.
"It's flown off now but I think it's probably gone off to feed somewhere in the forest and it may be back later."

Mr Morton will now report his sighting to the British Birds Rarities Committee (BBRC), which will confirm the recording.
He said: "I don't think there will be any doubt over it. So many people saw it."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-dorset-27656057
Back to top
View user's profile 
AnalisOffline
Great Old One
Joined: 12 Apr 2006
Total posts: 926
Gender: Unknown
PostPosted: 03-06-2014 17:13    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.estrepublicain.fr/actualite/2014/05/29/mordu-a-un-doigt-par-un-piranha

Quote:
Vosges : An angler bitten by a piranha

Saint-Dié. A piranha caught friday 16 pm in the swamp of La Ballastière, at Saint Marguerite in the Vosges !

The chairman of the AAPPMA (authorized assocation for fishing and protection of aquatic environments) of Saint-Dié, Michel Dorner, is like St Thomas. He had to see the fish to be convinced that it was not a joke.

« I remain sceptical, I have been fishing for more than 50 years, I have never heard of the presence of piranhas in our swamps wher in any case this species can not live for long because of cold temperatures, even if they tend to increase. Here, we are accustomed to the invasion of golden perchs, that breed very fast, but not to piranhas », explains chairman Dorner.

« Someone who got rid of it »

But he was faced with the evidence when Jean-Claude Charpy, a retired baker and a fishing guard for the private association « Les Amis de la Ballatière » took the catch (17 cm long and 8 tall) out of his freezer. « I had just helped a fisherman to catch a pike when he showed me the 'funny' fish he had caught and who had bitten his finger. Every angler who was present was surprized», says Jean-Claude Charpy. « This species that lives in warm waters (22-24 degrees) of South America has indeed to come from somewhere, it is not a bird that brought eggs, it has to be somebody who got rid of it », says Michel Dorner.

Owner of the shop « Vive le Jardin », Jonathan Fonmosse explains that it is a red-bellied piranha (pygocentrus nattereri), a tropical species that he sometimes sells to customers.
Back to top
View user's profile 
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Fortean Times Message Board Forum Index -> Cryptozoology - general All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 39, 40, 41, 42  Next
Page 40 of 42

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group