Forums

 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages 
Medical mysteries, bizarre cases
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Fortean Times Message Board Forum Index -> The Human Condition
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25754
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 28-03-2012 07:49    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is a very minor mystery, but IHTM so I find it interesting!

About ten days ago I stupidly managed to gash both my thumbs on an empty can I was preparing for recycling. It took ages to stop the bleeding, but eventually I managed to get sticking plasters over the wounds. I've been changing the plasters every day after my shower, and the wounds seem to be healing OK.

But today after my shower I decided to cut my nails, and found that though those on my fingers had got rather long, the nails on my thumbs hardly needed cutting at all!

I can think of two possible reasons:
A. The physical constraint of the plasters over the nails prevented them from growing
or
B. My body was diverting resources from nail growth to wound healing.
(Or perhaps both.)

Has anyone else experienced something similar?
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25754
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 26-04-2012 19:09    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cornish alpaca TB campaigner Dianne Summers has disease

A woman from Cornwall who received an award for her campaign for compulsory tuberculosis (TB) testing of alpacas has contracted the illness.
Dianne Summers, from Redruth, had eight of the animals put down in 2008-09 when they tested positive for bovine TB.
She said she believed she contracted the disease from the animals and was undergoing nine months of treatment.

Bovine TB, which can take years to develop, damages animals' lungs and leads to death if not treated.
Ms Summers received an award from the British Alpaca Society (BAS), which promotes the welfare of alpacas and llamas for the campaign.

Libby Henson, from the society, said: "We're all very upset."
She added: "Di's the member who knows the most about TB and is on the ground and gives advice to other owners who's herd have been infected, which is why this has possibly happened.
"She's quite poorly but she's started the treatment, which is quite a long process. But at least she now is being treated."

Bovine TB is believed to be primarily passed from one animal to another by breathing in bacteria.
It is a notifiable disease, which means there is a legal requirement to report it if it is present - or suspected in a herd - but there is currently no legal requirement for animals to be regularly tested.

Alpacas have little resistance to TB and can die within six months of catching it, the BAS said.
There are currently 1,500 alpaca owners of an estimated 35,000 animals registered with the British Alpaca Society.
The animals, which originally come from the high plains of Peru, Bolivia and Chile in South America, are normally bred for their wool.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-17852475

According to the Q&As (linked on the page)

Can the disease spread to humans?

Bovine TB can be passed on to humans but instances of this happening are very rare, mainly due to the introduction of pasteurised milk.
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25754
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 29-04-2012 09:34    Post subject: Reply with quote

A beautiful mind: College dropout became genius after brutal street attack and now turns mathmatical formulae into stunning works of art
By Rob Preece
PUBLISHED: 10:56, 28 April 2012 | UPDATED: 11:12, 28 April 2012

A college dropout has been hailed a unique maths genius - after his brain was damaged in a brutal attack by muggers.
Jason Padgett, 41, was left concussed after he was ambushed outside a karaoke club and repeatedly kicked in the head.

Now, wherever he looks, he sees mathematical formulas and turns them into stunning, intricate diagrams he can draw by hand.
He is the only person in the world known to have the skill and experts say it was caused by his head injury.
They believe the damage to Mr Padgett's brain has left him with a 'remarkable gift' for figures, much like the brilliant mathematician John Nash.

Mr Padgett, who works behind the counter at a furniture store in Tacoma, in the U.S. state of Washington, told ABC News: 'I’m obsessed with numbers, geometry specifically.
'I literally dream about it. There’s not a moment that I can’t see it, and it just doesn’t turn off.'

Mr Padgett does not have a PhD, a degree or even a background in maths.
Instead, his talent was born out of a true medical mystery that scientists around the world are still trying to unravel.

Ten years ago, Mr Padgett was only interested in two things: working out and partying.
One night he was walking out of a karaoke club in Tacoma when he was set upon by muggers who beat and kicked him in the head repeatedly.
The unlikely genius thought he was going to be killed as his attackers went for his $99 leather jacket.
'All I saw was a bright flash of light and the next thing I knew I was on my knees on the ground and I thought, "I’m gonna get killed",' he said.

At the time, doctors said he had a concussion, but within a day or two, Mr Padgett began to notice something remarkable.
A college dropout who could not draw became obsessed with producing intricate diagrams, but he had no idea what they were.
'I see bits and pieces of the Pythagorean theorem everywhere,' he said.
'Every single little curve, every single spiral, every tree is part of that equation.'

Mr Padgett draws diagrams called fractals.
He can produce a visual representation of the formula Pi, the infinite number which begins with 3.14.
He said: 'A fractal is a shape that when you take the shape a part into pieces, the pieces are the same or similar to the whole.
'So say I had 1,000 pictures of you, that were little and I put all those little pictures of you in the right spot to make the exact same picture of you, but bigger.'

Much like Nash, who was played by Russell Crowe in the 2001 film, A Beautiful Mind, researchers believe Mr Padgett has a remarkable gift.
To better understand how his brain works, neuroscientist and philosophy professor Berit Brogaard and her team flew Mr Padgett to Finland to run a series of tests.
A scan showed damage that was forcing his brain to overcompensate in certain areas that most people do not have access to.

Prof Brogaard, who is based at the Center for Neurodynamics at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, said the result that Mr Padgett is now an acquired savant, meaning brilliant in a specific area.
'Savant syndrome is the development of a particular skill, that can be mathematical, spatial, or autistic, that develop to an extreme degree that sort of makes a person superhuman,' the professor added.

Mr Padgett said his goal was to get out of the furniture store and into the classroom to hopefully teach others that maths is as beautiful and natural as the world around us.
When asked if he thought his talent was a burden or a gift, he said it was a mixture of both.
'Sometimes I would really like to turn it off, and it won’t,' he said.
'But the good far outweighs the bad. I would not give it up for anything.'
Mr Padgett sells his pictures, which can also be viewed here:
http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/jason-padgett.html

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2136513/Brain-damaged-college-dropout-maths-genius-attack.html#ixzz1tQ6C0weD
Back to top
View user's profile 
MythopoeikaOffline
Joined: 18 Sep 2001
Total posts: 9534
Gender: Unknown
PostPosted: 29-04-2012 11:24    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's the first time I've heard of brain damage improving someone's IQ.
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25754
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 15-06-2012 07:49    Post subject: Reply with quote

US man contracts the plague saving a mouse
A man in Oregon is severely ill in hospital with a suspected case of the plague, thought to have been contracted as he tried saving a mouse from the jaws of a stray cat in his neighbourhood.
By Amy Willis, Los Angeles
6:34AM BST 15 Jun 2012

The unnamed man, said to be in his 50s, was bitten as he attempted to extract the rodent from the cat’s mouth, althought it was unclear from which animal he caught the disease.
"Taking a mouse out of a cat's mouth is probably not a good idea," said Emilio DeBess, the public health veterinarian for Oregon.

After falling ill with a fever a few days later, he checked into a hospital where doctors said he was exhibiting classic symptoms of the devastating 14th Century disease.
Initially he showed signs of the Bubonic plague, including swollen lymph nodes in his armpits and groin. He then had abdominal pains and bleeding – a symptom of Septicaemic plague.

The Black Death, one of the worst pandemics in human history, was caused by an outbreak of the plague, resulting in the deaths of 25 million people in Europe between 1348 and 1350.

The man is undergoing tests to confirm the diagnosis.
Modern drugs can cure the disease if administered soon enough – however a vaccine for the plague is not currently sold in America. Without the inoculation, around 70 per cent of plague victims usually die within a few days of exposure.
“This can be a serious illness. But it is treatable with antibiotics, and it's also preventable," Dr DeBess said.

The bacterium that causes the plague, Yersinia pestis, is carried by rodents and other carnivores including cats and dogs. There are around 10 to 20 cases of the plague each year, most contracted through fleas that have feasted on the blood of an infected animal.
Only four people have died from the disease since 1934.

The cat, which had been living in the man’s neighbourhood for around six years, has since died and its body is being examined by experts.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/9333067/US-man-contracts-the-plague-saving-a-mouse.html
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25754
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 20-06-2012 06:18    Post subject: Reply with quote

US teen survives spear through brain

A US teenager's survival after a spear was shot through his brain is a miracle, doctors say.
Yasser Lopez, 16, is recovering after he was accidentally hit with a spear gun by a friend during a Florida fishing trip this month.
Medics at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami said the 3ft (90cm) projectile entered his brain over his right eye and went out the back of his head.
He is now out of bed and speaking following a three-hour operation.

Medics said he was awake as he arrived at hospital, and became "agitated".
After sedating the teenager, part of the stainless steel spear had to be severed with a mechanical cutter so he could fit into the CT scanner.

Doctors said the teenager has no memory of the freak accident.
He was shot with the projectile as he swam in a lake near his Miami area home on 8 June when his friend set off the trigger of a spear gun he was loading.

While medics are not sure of the extent of the damage to his memory and other parts of the brain, they say his condition could have been much worse.
"It's a miracle the spear missed all the main blood vessels of the brain," neurosurgeon Ross Bullock told reporters.

Also helpful, doctors say, was the foreign object's trajectory into the right side of the brain, Mr Lopez's non-dominant lobe, missing the parts responsible for speech and other important functions.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-18509408
Back to top
View user's profile 
kamalktkOffline
Great Old One
Joined: 05 Feb 2011
Total posts: 971
Gender: Unknown
PostPosted: 21-06-2012 21:28    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner2 wrote:
US teen survives spear through brain

A US teenager's survival after a spear was shot through his brain is a miracle, doctors say.
Yasser Lopez, 16, is recovering after he was accidentally hit with a spear gun by a friend during a Florida fishing trip this month.
Medics at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami said the 3ft (90cm) projectile entered his brain over his right eye and went out the back of his head.
He is now out of bed and speaking following a three-hour operation.

Medics said he was awake as he arrived at hospital, and became "agitated".
After sedating the teenager, part of the stainless steel spear had to be severed with a mechanical cutter so he could fit into the CT scanner.

Doctors said the teenager has no memory of the freak accident.
He was shot with the projectile as he swam in a lake near his Miami area home on 8 June when his friend set off the trigger of a spear gun he was loading.

While medics are not sure of the extent of the damage to his memory and other parts of the brain, they say his condition could have been much worse.
"It's a miracle the spear missed all the main blood vessels of the brain," neurosurgeon Ross Bullock told reporters.

Also helpful, doctors say, was the foreign object's trajectory into the right side of the brain, Mr Lopez's non-dominant lobe, missing the parts responsible for speech and other important functions.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-18509408

Phinneas Gage laughs, calls him an amateur! Laughing
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25754
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 22-06-2012 16:33    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tumour op in womb saves foetus

Surgeons have removed a tumour from the mouth of a foetus, in what has been described as a "world first" procedure.
After a scan at 17 weeks, mother Tammy Gonzalez said she "could see a bubble" coming out of her baby's mouth.
Doctors said it was a very rare tumour called an oral teratoma and there was little chance her daughter would survive.
After the pioneering operation, baby Leyna was born five months later.

Doctors at the Jackson Memorial Hospital in Florida, said this type of tumour was so rare it had been seen only once in 20 years at the hospital.

In the procedure, Mrs Gonzalez was put under a local anaesthetic as a needle was pushed through the protective amniotic sac around the foetus.
A laser was then used to cut the tumour from Leyna's lips. The operation lasted just over an hour.

Tammy told a press conference in Miami: "When they finally severed the whole thing off and I could see it floating down, it was like this huge weight had been lifted off me and I could finally see her face."
She described the surgeons as "saviours".

The doctors said: "To our knowledge, this is the first successful treatment of a foetal oral teratoma in utero."
Leyna Mykaella Gonzalez was born in October 2010 weighing 8lb 1oz. She is now a healthy 20-month-old child.
The only sign of her life-saving surgery is a tiny scar on her mouth.

The details have only just emerged after the operation was reported in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-18548506
Back to top
View user's profile 
JamesWhiteheadOffline
Piffle Prospector
Joined: 02 Aug 2001
Total posts: 5688
Location: Manchester, UK
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 14-08-2012 22:28    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is the young woman in this video really suffering from a unique medical condition?

Found in FT Breaking News

Some of the comments beneath reflect what I was thinking as I viewed the video:
a) that she has a form of psoriasis;
b) that it is a pity her medical funding depends on such a drama;
c) that the story ought to be about medical funding.

Oh, none of the images in the video are as dramatic as the headline. Question
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25754
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 18-08-2012 18:52    Post subject: Reply with quote

Brazil man survives steel rod through head

[video]

A Brazilian construction worker has survived after a 2m (six-foot) steel rod fell from above and pierced his head, doctors who treated him say.
Eduardo Leite was taken to a Rio de Janeiro hospital, where the rod was removed after five hours of surgery.
The doctors said he responded well to surgery, suffered no adverse consequences and has experienced little pain.
He narrowly escaped partial paralysis and loss of an eye, they added.

The rod is said to have fallen from the fifth floor of a building under construction.
It pierced Mr Leite's hard hat, then the back of his skull, before exiting between his eyes.

Luis Alexandre Essinger, chief of staff at the Miguel Couto hospital, said Mr Leite was conscious when he arrived there and explained what had happened to him.
"He was taken to the operating room, his skull was opened, they examined the brain and the surgeon decided to pull the metal bar out from the front in the same direction it entered the brain," he said.
Mr Leite had "few complaints" after the surgery, Mr Essinger added, saying "it really was a miracle" that he survived.

Neurosurgeon Ruy Monteiro told local TV that the bar had entered a part of the brain with no specific major known function.
The victim is expected to stay in hospital for another two weeks, and will be given antibiotics to avoid risk of infection.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-19307388
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25754
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 24-08-2012 06:51    Post subject: Reply with quote

A mystery being uncovered:

'Brush' offers clues to fighting lung disease

Scientists say the discovery of an internal "brush" that helps clear lungs of unwanted matter could help them understand more about lung diseases.
A team from the University of North Carolina found that the brush-like layer pushes out sticky mucus and the foreign bodies it contains.
Writing in Science, it says that could help identify what goes wrong in cystic fibrosis, asthma and similar diseases.

UK lung experts said the work aided understanding of how lungs function.
The mucus, which helps collect inhaled pollutants, emerges as a runny nose and a wet cough.
Until now, most experts believed a watery substance acted as a lubricant and helped separate mucus from the cells lining airways.
But this did not tally with the fact that mucus remained in its own distinct layer.

The researchers used imaging techniques to examine what was happening within the lungs.
They were able to see a dense meshwork of human bronchial epithelial cell cultures.

The brush-like layer consists of protective molecules that keep sticky mucus from reaching the cilia and epithelial cells, thus ensuring the normal flow of mucus.

Dr Michael Rubinstein, who led the study, said: "The air we breathe isn't exactly clean, and we take in many dangerous elements with every breath.
"We need a mechanism to remove all the junk we breathe in, and the way it's done is with a very sticky gel, called mucus, that catches these particles and removes them with the help of tiny cilia."
"The cilia are constantly beating, even while we sleep.
"In a co-ordinated fashion, they push mucus, containing foreign objects, out of the lungs, and we either swallow it or spit it out.

"These cilia even beat for a few hours after we die. If they stopped, we'd be flooded with mucus that provides a fertile breeding ground for bacteria."

etc...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-19357090

Next time I cough up a gob of phlegm, I shall look at it with more interest!
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25754
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 01-09-2012 06:24    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lungs again, but this time it's bad news:

Deadly Yosemite virus warning to 10,000 US campers

Thousands of people could be at risk from a deadly virus in California's Yosemite National Park that has already claimed two lives, officials say.
Four other cases of Hantavirus, a rare lung disease, have been reported.

The park said it is getting about 1,000 calls per day from frightened visitors on its Hantavirus hotline.
There is no known cure for the virus, spread by infected rodent droppings. Symptoms can take up to six weeks and one third of cases are fatal.
The virus is carried in rodent faeces, urine and saliva. When it dries out and mixes with dust, it can be inhaled by humans, especially in small, stuffy spaces.
The disease can also spread if people touch or eat contaminated substances, or are bitten by an infected animal.

The first death was reported earlier this month - one of those who died was a 37-year-old man from the San Francisco Bay area.

The outbreak of the virus at Yosemite is thought to have been caused by mice nesting in the insulation of tents at a campsite in the Curry Village area of the reserve.
About 10,000 visitors stayed at the campsite between June and August and could be at risk of contracting the virus, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said.
The CDC added that they were looking into suspected cases of the disease in "multiple health jurisdictions".
They also urged doctors to report diagnosed cases of Hantavirus to state health authorities.

The park has contacted about 3,000 groups of visitors warning them to seek medical advice if they experience flu-like symptoms, including headache, fever, shortness of breath, muscle ache and cough.
Severe cases can lead to extreme breathing difficulty and death.

Earlier this week, park officials closed all 91 "signature" cabins after finding deer mice, which carry the virus, nesting between the double walls of the luxury tents.
But they added that the outbreak of the virus had not led to a wave of cancellations.
"Right now it's normal numbers for Friday," Yosemite spokeswoman Kari Cobb said.
"There have been cancellations, but it would be grossly overstated to say they're cancelling en masse. There's quite a bit of people out there still.
"It's still summer and a holiday weekend. It's still the summer crowds," she said.

Nearly four million people visit Yosemite National Park annually and about 70% of them visit Yosemite Valley, where Curry Village is located.
The park has seen two other cases of the hantavirus in a more remote area in 2000 and 2010, but this year's deaths were the first.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-19447160
Back to top
View user's profile 
ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 20928
Location: Dublin
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 12-09-2012 21:35    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some more background to the Yosemite cases.

Quote:
Despite 1993 cases, hantavirus remains mostly a mystery
September 12th, 2012 in Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

In his 30-plusyears as a doctor, Bruce Tempest had never seen anything like it. A Navajo man having trouble breathing showed up at the emergency room of a small hospital in Gallup, N.M. Less than an hour later, he was dead.

The man had been young, athletic and otherwise healthy. His fiancee had died days before, also from sudden breathing problems.

"This is something different," Tempest, now 76, remembered thinking of the 1993 illnesses. "It just doesn't fit."

Tempest contacted area doctors, looking for other cases. Then he asked the University of New Mexico for help. Soon, the patients were being flown to Albuquerque. They arrived with chills and aches but soon were in complete respiratory distress. Physicians were at a loss: Was it sepsis? Influenza? Bubonic plague?

Doctors had a medical mystery, and they knew it had to be solved quickly. Patients were showing up at the hospital "not feeling well one day and being dead the next," said Gregory Glass, an epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins University.

When the cases hit television, a lucky clue came in. A doctor called and said the illness sounded a lot like a virus he had observed in Korea in the 1950s. It was called hantavirus.

This summer's hantavirus outbreak in Yosemite National Park is as a sobering reminder: Mystery still surrounds the disease.

"The biggest mystery is we don't have a good explanation," said Barbara Knust, a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention epidemiologist. "For Yosemite, why this year of all years is there an increased number of cases?"

Nearly 20 years after being identified in the U.S., hantavirus is better understood but no less vexing. Researchers now know it causes hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, a severe respiratory disease. It is transmitted through the droppings and urine of deer mice, and not through person-to-person contact. Treated early, patients have a better chance of survival. But there is no cure, and more than one-third of patients die.

The Yosemite cases follow the pattern: Three of the eight visitors who fell ill died. Health officials have called the Yosemite outbreak unprecedented - more than one hantavirus infection from the same location in the same year is very rare.

The National Park Service has closed the cabins believed to be at the heart of the outbreak. State and federal scientists are scouring the park, trapping mice and conducting laboratory tests. Public health officials are warning doctors worldwide to watch for possible symptoms, which can be confused with the flu and can take weeks to show up.

And the California Department of Public Health said the risk of new cases remains, even as the summer surge of visitors wanes.

"These are not isolated cases in the hospitals in the mountains," said Daniel Uslan, assistant professor of infectious diseases at the University of California, Los Angeles medical school. "These are potentially people coming back to Los Angeles or other urban centers where doctors are perhaps not as aware of the infection."

Officials investigating the Yosemite cases have more to go on than a lucky tip. But just like in 1993, they are under pressure to quickly learn more about a disease that is pervasive and deadly.

As patients continued dying in the Four Corners region, doctors and epidemiologists had to accomplish three monumental tasks: pinpoint the cause of the illness, determine why only some people were getting it and track down its origin.

The CDC analyzed tissue from survivors and those who had died. Researchers tested for antibodies against viruses and hoped for a hit, said Glass, the Johns Hopkins epidemiologist. When they tried hantavirus, they got a match.

Still, they didn't know why certain people got sick and others didn't. Paul Ettestad, part of the CDC team, visited homes throughout the Four Corners and asked relatives what the victims did in the days before they got sick. He also compared the victims' homes with neighbors' homes.

Researchers also tried to find the source of the disease. Knowing that rodents carried hantavirus, they trapped hundreds of small mammals and found the virus in nearly one-third of the deer mice, according to the CDC. By year-end, scientists isolated the specific type of hantavirus that caused the Four Corners cases and grew it in a laboratory.

"From an epidemiologist's point of view, this was amazing," Glass said. "We use it as a textbook case of how to do a really good epidemiology."

The CDC started tracking every case of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome across the U.S. In 1993, 48 people became ill. From 1994 to 2011, an average of 28 people got the disease each year.

Cases are more common in the Southwest but still are rare, said Elisabeth Lawaczeck, a public health veterinarian for the state of Colorado. "You have to be in the wrong place, in the wrong time, do the wrong thing - and inhale," she said.

Scientists still don't know why certain deer mice get hantavirus or how they spread it. And even though deer mice are ubiquitous, they haven't figured out why outbreaks occur in certain areas at certain times.

The Four Corners cases were eventually linked to heavy rainfall that year, which meant more vegetation - and more food - for deer mice, causing a population boom. There were 10 times more deer mice in the Four Corners in May 1993 than a year earlier, according to the CDC.

Yosemite may provide more clues in the long-running hantavirus mystery. Public health officials and epidemiologists are compiling information about the cases, hoping they can determine the deadly combination of factors that led to the outbreak.
The construction of the cabins in Curry Village - with more insulation and less ventilation - may have contributed, said Stan Deresinksi, an infectious disease specialist at Stanford University School of Medicine. Seven of Yosemite's eight hantavirus cases originated in those cabins.

Or perhaps there was something different about this year's deer mouse population. Were there more of them? Were they clustered closer to humans? Whatever the reason, experts warn that deer mice aren't going anywhere, so hantavirus isn't either.

"The Sierras are their home, and there are 4 million visitors a year to Yosemite," Deresinksi said. "It is amazing there haven't been more cases."
(c)2012 Los Angeles Times

Distributed by MCT Information Services

"Despite 1993 cases, hantavirus remains mostly a mystery." September 12th, 2012. http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-09-cases-hantavirus-mystery.html
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25754
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 14-09-2012 08:00    Post subject: Reply with quote

The girl who must eat every 15 minutes to stay alive
Lizzie Velasquez weighs just four stone and has almost zero per cent body fat but she is not anorexic.
12:09PM BST 28 Jun 2010

In fact, the 21-year-old from Austin, Texas, must eat every 15 minutes to stay healthy.
Miss Velasquez has a rare condition which prevents her from gaining weight even though she eats up to 60 small meals a day.
Despite consuming between 5,000 and 8,000 calories daily, the communications student, has never tipped over 4st 3lbs. Shocked

"I weigh myself regularly and if I gain even one pound I get really excited," said 5ft 2 ins Miss Velasquez, who wears size triple zero clothes.
"I eat every 15-20 minutes to keep my energy levels up.
"I eat small portions of crisps, sweets, chocolate, pizza, chicken, cake, doughnuts, ice cream, noodles and pop tarts all day long, so I get pretty upset when people accuse me of being anorexic."

She was born four weeks prematurely weighing just 2lb 10oz. Doctors found there was minimal amniotic fluid protecting her in the womb.
"They told us they had no idea how she could have survived," said Miss Velasquez's mother Rita, 45, a church secretary.

Doctors speculated Lizzie might have the genetic disorder De Barsy syndrome but soon ruled it out as it became clear she did not have learning difficulties.

"They kept on trying to figure out what was wrong with her but we treated her like any other child," said Mrs Velasquez, who charted her daughter's health in dozens of notebooks.
She was taken to see genetic experts but they still could not diagnose her.

Miss Velasquez's case has fascinated doctors all over the world and she is part of a genetic study run by Professor Abhimanyu Garg, MD, at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.

Professor Garg and his team now believe Lizzie may have a form of Neonatal Progeroid Syndrome (NPS) which causes accelerated ageing, fat loss from the face and body, and tissue degeneration. People with PRS often have triangular and prematurely aged faces with a pointy nose.

He said: "I am aware of a small number of people that have similar conditions to Lizzie but each case is slightly different.
"We cannot predict what will happen to Lizzie in the future as the medical community are yet to document older people with NPS.
"However Lizzie is lucky to have healthy teeth, organs and bones so the outlook is good. We will continue to study her case and learn from her."

Miss Velasquez has helped to write a book about her incredible experiences.
It is due to be released in September.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/7858664/The-girl-who-must-eat-every-15-minutes-to-stay-alive.html
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25754
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 06-10-2012 23:56    Post subject: Reply with quote

Congo Fever: Patient dies in hospital

A 38-year-old man who contracted Crimean-Congo Viral Haemorrhagic Fever (CCVHF) has died in hospital.
The man was diagnosed with the rare tropical disease after flying into Glasgow on Tuesday. He was returning from Kabul in Afghanistan.
He was transferred on Friday to the Royal Free Hospital in London on a special RAF isolation aircraft.
A spokesman for the hospital confirmed on Saturday morning that the man had died.

The Royal Free Hospital houses the national specialist centre for the management of patients with hazardous infections.
It is the first case of CCVHF to have been confirmed in the UK.

The patient had originally been admitted to the specialist Brownlee unit in Glasgow's Gartnavel General Hospital less than three hours after returning to the city on Emirates flight EK027 from Dubai.
He had driven home from Glasgow Airport using his own vehicle before seeking medical help.
Two passengers sitting close to him on the flight from Dubai are being monitored as a precaution.

But a further two passengers who were also contacted by health authorities do not require any follow-up, Greater Glasgow and Clyde health board has said.

Public health consultant, Dr Syed Ahmed, who is coordinating the investigations into this case, said: "The risk of person to person transmission of Crimean Congo Viral Haemorrhagic Fever is very low as it can only be transmitted by direct contact with infected blood and body fluids.
"It is not a virus which is transmitted through the air.
"The monitoring of these two passengers is purely precautionary and is in line the national guidance for the management of cases such as this."
The health authority has said the risk to all other passengers was "extremely low" but advised anyone with concerns to contact NHS 24.

CCVHF is a zoonosis - a disease found in animals that can infect humans.
Outbreaks are usually linked to contact with blood or body fluids from infected animals or people.
Onset is sudden, with initial symptoms including high fever, joint pain, stomach pain, and vomiting.
Red eyes, a flushed face and red spots in the throat are also common.

As the illness progresses, patients can develop large areas of severe bruising, severe nosebleeds, and uncontrolled bleeding.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-19856504
Back to top
View user's profile 
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Fortean Times Message Board Forum Index -> The Human Condition All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next
Page 4 of 7

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group