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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 26-10-2012 14:00    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sisters can’t recognise faces...even their own
ROBIN PERRIE
Published: 24th October 2012

TWO sisters with a bizarre medical condition are unable to recognise faces — even their OWN.
Donna Jones and Victoria Wardley cannot remember what their partners or kids look like — and walk past lifelong friends in the street.
They have trouble knowing themselves in the MIRROR — and don’t bother taking photos because when they look at them they’ve no idea who anyone is.

The sisters suffer from prosopagnosia, also known as face blindness, which means they can recognise objects but not faces.
Although they have had it from birth, they didn’t really notice it until teenage years.

Married Victoria, 32, revealed: “My doctor used to come into the coffee shop where I worked every day and I never recognised him. He told me to come in for a couple of tests and we found out I had prosopagnosia.”

Describing her symptoms, the dog groomer added: “When I see someone’s face it’s like tunnel vision. I can make out an eye or a nose, but when I try to look at a whole face it doesn’t work.”

Donna, 30, was diagnosed soon after. The mum of one said: “It was a relief to know that something was wrong. I’ve gone up to men in supermarkets thinking they were my partner, only to realise I’d grabbed hold of the wrong man.” Shocked

The sisters, from York, manage to recognise loved ones from their clothes or traits such as how they walk.
But Donna cannot spot daughter Rebecca, 14, when she comes out of school in the same uniform as the other children.
She said: “I even find it hard to pick out my daughter from a crowd. I feel so guilty. I should know what my child looks like, but I just find it impossible.”

The pair rarely go out just as a twosome after losing each other for hours at a time in supermarkets and nightclubs.

But office worker Donna says there is an upside.
Every time she sees partner Paul, 40, she fancies him as if it was their first encounter.
She said: “He’s really hot so it’s a nice surprise every time.”

Dr Sarah Bate, from Bournemouth University’s Centre for Face Processing Disorders, said people can develop the condition or have it brought on by trauma.
She added: “Sometimes the condition runs in families. Estimates suggest as many as two per cent of the population have a degree of face blindness, yet public awareness remains low.”

Read more: http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/4605918/Sisters-cant-recognise-faceseven-their-own.html#ixzz2APh39h25
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escargot1Offline
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PostPosted: 26-10-2012 16:21    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fancy having trouble knowing themselves in the MIRROR.
That must be AWFUL. Laughing
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 27-11-2012 20:05    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was aware of this problem with some medications, but it seems not enough people (including medics) know about it:

Grapefruit and pills mix warning
By James Gallagher, Health and science reporter, BBC News

Doctors have warned of a "lack of knowledge" about the dangers of mixing some medications with grapefruit.
The fruit can cause overdoses of some drugs by stopping the medicines being broken down in the intestines and the liver.

The researchers who first identified the link said the number of drugs that became dangerous with grapefruit was increasing rapidly.
They were writing in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.
The team at the Lawson Health Research Institute in Canada said the number of drugs which had serious side effects with grapefruit had gone from 17 in 2008 to 43 in 2012.

They include some drugs for a range of conditions including blood pressure, cancer and cholesterol-lowering statins and those taken to suppress the immune system after an organ transplant.

Chemicals in grapefruit, furanocoumarins, wipe out an enzyme which breaks the drugs down. It means much more of the drug escapes the digestive system than the body can handle.
Three times the levels of one blood pressure drug, felodipine, was reported after patients had a glass of grapefruit juice compared with a glass of water.

The side effects are varied depending on the drug, but include stomach bleeds, altered heart beat, kidney damage and sudden death. Shocked

Dr David Bailey, one of the researchers, told the BBC: "One tablet with a glass of grapefruit juice can be like taking five or 10 tablets with a glass of water and people say I don't believe it, but I can show you that scientifically it is sound.
"So you can unintentionally go from a therapeutic level to a toxic level just by consuming grapefruit juice."
The report said: "We contend that there remains a lack of knowledge about this interaction in the general health care community."

They added: "Unless health care professionals are aware of the possibility that the adverse event they are seeing might have an origin in the recent addition of grapefruit to the patient's diet, it is very unlikely that they will investigate it."

Other citrus fruits such as Seville oranges, often used in marmalade, and limes have the same effect. Sad

Neal Patel, from the Royal Pharmaceutical Society said: "Grapefruit isn't the only food that can cause issues, for example milk can stop the absorption of some antibiotics if taken at the same time.
"Although some of these interactions may not be clinically significant, some may lead to more serious outcomes.
"Pharmacists are the best port of call for anyone concerned about how their diet may affect their medication. Information about any interactions would always be included in the patient information leaflet that comes with the medicine."

A spokesman from the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency said: "We encourage patients and healthcare professionals to report any suspected adverse drug reactions to our Yellow Card Scheme.
"You can get more information about the scheme and report online."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-20497086
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MythopoeikaOffline
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PostPosted: 27-11-2012 22:10    Post subject: Reply with quote

This issue has been known about for a long time - funny how they're only now making public announcements.
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Timble2Offline
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PostPosted: 27-11-2012 23:55    Post subject: Reply with quote

A lot of this has been known for years, what it does demonstrate is that very few people ever read the packet inserts or summaries of product characteristics.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 08-12-2012 08:18    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pioneering surgery repairs girl's spine with leg bone
By James Gallagher, Health and science reporter, BBC News

A five-year old girl has had pioneering surgery to repair a large gap in her spine using bone taken from her legs.
Before the operation, Rosie Davies, from Walsall in the West Midlands, was "basically a timebomb", her family said.
Missing bones in her spine meant her upper body weight was unsupported and her inner organs were being crushed.

The lifesaving surgery came at the cost of her lower legs, which she had always been unable to move.
Rosie was born with a very rare disorder called spinal segmental dysgenesis. Five bones which made up part of her spine were missing, leaving a 10cm gap in her backbone. Her legs were also contorted up against her belly and she had very little feeling in them.

She was slowly running out of space in her chest - and running out of time. Eventually the internal crush would have led to Rosie's organs failing, which would have killed her.
In her last scan before the operation there was evidence of her kidneys being crushed.

Rosie's legs were amputated from the knee down and a section of bone was taken to bridge the gap in her spine.
Two metal rods were then bolted to the upper spine and the hips to provide extra support.
The operation at Birmingham Children's Hospital took 13 hours.

Her dad Scott said: "Before she was basically a timebomb - we never knew how long it would take to go off, we never knew how long we actually had with her.
"Since having the op she's now had her life expectancy increased to that of a normal child."

Since the surgery there have been early signs of sensation returning to her legs, which means it may be possible for Rosie to one day walk with prosthetic legs.

Her mum Mandy said: "Rosie is such a strong character. You give her the equipment to use and she'll do it, whether it's sticks or artificial legs or her hands - she'll make a way of walking.
"All she has ever wanted to do is be like her sister. All she's wanted to do is ride her bike like her sister, run like her sister."
Rosie's parents said she now had more confidence.

An operation of this scale has never been attempted in Europe before. The only similar procedure took place 10 years ago in New Zealand.

Mr Guirish Solanki, one of the consultant neurosurgeons who operated on Rosie, said: "We are delighted with the results of this operation.
"This is only the second time in the world that a surgical team has attempted to fix the thoracic spine to the hip side bones for a condition as rare as Rosie's.

"This case was very complicated as normally children with this condition do not have a working spinal cord or nerves but Rosie did. So in carrying out this procedure we had to be extremely careful not to damage her nerves."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-20426413
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 21-12-2012 23:28    Post subject: Reply with quote

20 December 2012 Last updated at 18:48

Brussels sprouts 'overdose' hospitalised man at Christmas, report reveals

A man from Ayrshire had to be hospitalised after eating too many Brussels sprouts last Christmas, it has emerged.
The traditional Christmas vegetable contain lots of vitamin K which promotes blood clotting.
However, this counteracted the effect of anticoagulants the man was taking because he had a mechanical heart.

Doctors at the Golden Jubilee Hospital in Clydebank eventually realised too many sprouts were to blame.
The case was reported in a festive edition of the Medical Journal of Australia.
It outlines how the man's condition stabilised after the diagnosis.

Consultant cardiologist Dr Roy Gardner said: "Patients who are taking anticoagulants are generally advised not to eat too many green leafy vegetables, as they are full of vitamin K, which antagonise the action of this vital medication."

Jill Young, chief executive of the Golden Jubilee Hospital, added: "Whilst we think this is possibly the first-ever festive admission to hospital caused by the consumption of Brussels sprouts, we were delighted that we were able to stabilise his levels."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-20805966
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 24-12-2012 11:09    Post subject: Reply with quote

Doctors 'save man's life by using alcohol'

UK doctors have saved a man's life using an unconventional treatment - a shot of neat alcohol into the arteries supplying his heart.
Ronald Aldom, 77, from Portishead near Bristol, had an unusual heart rhythm called ventricular tachychardia that can be fatal if left unchecked.
Medics had tried to treat it using standard methods but with no success.
They resorted to using pure ethanol to trigger a controlled heart attack and kill off some of his heart muscle.

The procedure involved passing a catheter into a blood vessel in the groin and guiding it up towards the heart.
Once the catheter identifies which part of the heart the dangerous rhythms are coming from, the ethanol dose can be delivered.
This kills the area of the heart muscle causing the problem allowing the heart's rhythm to return to normal.

This rare treatment has only been conducted a handful of times in the UK.
Cardiologist Dr Tom Johnson, who carried out the procedure at the Bristol Heart Institute, said Mr Aldom was now "much better".
"He wasn't going to leave hospital unless something was done. There was no other option."

Mr Aldom, who is now out of hospital, said: "I think it's wonderful that the doctors tried everything to help me.
"If they hadn't have done this I wouldn't be here now."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-20836084
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PostPosted: 12-01-2013 13:22    Post subject: Reply with quote

20 years old, with the body and brain of a 9 month old.
"She has been examined by some of the most prestigious medical institutions in the U.S., however no formal diagnosis for Brooke’s condition has been given, leading doctors to term her condition Syndrome X."
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2260378/She-just-stopped-growing-Meet-20-year-old-woman-trapped-inside-toddlers-body--doctors-baffled.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490
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PostPosted: 26-01-2013 00:03    Post subject: Reply with quote

'I use a wheelchair but I'm only pretending to be paralysed': The woman who desperately wants to be paraplegic

She has a rare condition called Body Integrity Identity Disorder which means she desperately wants to be paraplegic – paralysed below the waist

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/real-life-stories/woman-in-wheelchair-pretends-to-be-paralysed-chloe-1553850
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 17-03-2013 08:08    Post subject: Reply with quote

Holiday cruise left woman feeling permanently seasick
By Philippa Roxby, Health reporter, BBC News

While Michele-Marie Roberts was enjoying a two-week dream cruise to Hawaii with her husband and two sons, she had no idea that her world would be turned upside down when she stepped on to dry land.
"I walked down the gangplank and collapsed - completely blacked out. I got the flight back home and I was staggering all over the shop.
"I was slurring my speech - on one occasion I blacked out while chopping vegetables," she recalls.

The holiday ended in January 2008 but Michele-Marie still feels as if she is on that cruise ship. She's been seasick for five years.
"It's like the disorientating feeling you get after coming off a waltzer at the fair - all the time. It's horrendous."
When it is at its worst, even lying down doesn't help, she says.

Mal de Débarquement Syndrome (MdDS), as the condition is known, is extremely rare and very little is understood about why it occurs and what can cure it. Few doctors have even heard of it.

Michele-Marie, from Berkshire, was sent for an MRI scan and tested for multiple sclerosis and a range of other disorders before she was finally diagnosed six months after her cruise, thanks to doctors at the Royal Berkshire Hospital who recognised her symptoms.
But not all sufferers are quite as lucky - many can spend years looking for a diagnosis.

Unsurprisingly, feeling sick and in motion every minute of her waking life has taken its toll. She says it ruined her marriage because she could no longer look after or home-school her two sons, who are autistic, leaving her husband to take on the role of full-time carer.

After the divorce, at the age of 49, she had to look for a job for the first time in years, despite feeling physically and mentally drained by the persistent seasickness.
She was employed for a while but the experience was too draining so she decided to set up her own business - a dating agency called Wavelength for single parents of special needs children.

"I have days when I feel sorry for myself and there are days when I wake up and I wonder if it's gone away. But then it says, 'da-da - here I am'."
There are times when the syndrome can feel particularly debilitating, such as when she feels stressed, when shopping in supermarkets and using a computer.
Strip lighting can also aggravate the feelings of rocking and swaying.

Thankfully there are activities that alleviate the symptoms too, she says, including vigorous exercise, swimming and driving. She does at least two hours of exercise every day to help her cope.
"The more motion I am in the better," she explains.
"So I love Zumba, but when I stop it looks like I've consumed all the sherry in the trifle."

But she will never go back on a boat, despite loving the sea, because of the risk that her condition could get even worse.

Michele-Marie believes that she was susceptible to Mal de Débarquement syndrome because she was a women in her 40s who suffered from migraines - something suggested by a research paper from 2009, although the link is not straightforward.
She wants other women to be aware of her story so they can decide if they could be at risk too.

The same study found that MdDS was a disorder of brain plasticity, which means that the neural pathways in the brain are unable to change in response to changes in behaviour or environment.

In particularly rough seas during the cruise, Michele-Marie says that everyone was falling over and suffering from seasickness apart from her. Yet on dry land, she is the one slurring her words and being mistaken for being drunk.

"You think you're going bonkers when you have MdDs. You feel so isolated. The doctors did tests on me and there's very little they can do," she explains.
"I feel I was predisposed to it - and other women should know about it."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-21786689

(Side bars on page)
I've never heard of this syndrome before. But it is common, to a lesser degree, when coming ashore after days at sea, to feel as if the earth is moving. I've experienced it myself, several times. But it normally wears off in a few hours.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 27-05-2013 09:29    Post subject: Reply with quote

Man with 'Walking Corpse Syndrome' believes he is dead
A patient has written a disturbing account of life with a condition which makes him think he is dead - and how he spent his days in graveyards as it was "the closest I could get to death".
By Ben Bryant, and agencies
10:16PM BST 26 May 2013

The British man, identified only as Graham, woke up nine years ago utterly convinced that he was no longer alive even though he was still breathing.
Doctors diagnosed him with Cotard’s Syndrome, which is also known as ‘Walking Corpse Syndrome’ because it makes people think they have turned into zombies.
Graham did not believe them, however, and insisted that his brain was dead.

The unusual condition emerged after Graham, who suffered from severe depression, tried to commit suicide by taking an electrical appliance with him into the bath.
Eight months later he told doctors that his brain had died or was, at best, missing.
He lost interest in smoking, stopped speaking and refused to eat as there was "no point because I was dead".
Only through months of therapy and treatment was he able to overcome the condition and live anything approaching a normal life.

Cotard’s Syndrome is among the most rare diseases in the world and it is thought that it affects just few hundred people at any one time.
It is linked to depression and comes in a variety of forms including some who feel that their limbs are no longer functioning.

Writing in New Scientist magazine, Graham describes how baffled doctors referred him to neurologists Adam Zeman at the University of Exeter and Steven Laureys at the University of Liège in Belgium.

At the time Graham was being looked after by his family because his illness had gotten so bad.
He said: “I didn't want to face people. There was no point.
"I didn't feel pleasure in anything. I used to idolise my car, but I didn't go near it. All the things I was interested in went away.
"I lost my sense of smell and my sense of taste. There was no point in eating because I was dead. It was a waste of time speaking as I never had anything to say.”

The nadir was when he felt compelled to go to his local cemetery as he thought he would fit in.
He said: "I just felt I might as well stay there. It was the closest I could get to death. The police would come and get me, though, and take me back home."

Graham’s recovery started with scans which found that levels of activity in parts of his brain were so low they were more consistent with somebody in a vegetative state.
Mr Laureys said: ‘"I've been analysing (brain) scans for 15 years and I've never seen anyone who was on his feet, who was interacting with people, with such an abnormal scan result.
"Graham's brain function resembles that of someone during anaesthesia or sleep.”


After his own regime of therapy and drugs, Graham is on the road to recovery.
He said that he is not really back to normal but can go out of the house on his own and “feels a lot better” than he was.
He said: "I don't feel that brain-dead any more. Things just feel a bit bizarre sometimes.
"I'm not afraid of death. But that's not to do with what happened – we're all going to die sometime. I'm just lucky to be alive now."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/10081702/Man-with-Walking-Corpse-Syndrome-believes-he-is-dead.html
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 17-06-2013 08:27    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gene mutation means paracyclist has no fat under skin
By Philippa Roxby, Health reporter, BBC News

Baffled doctors are nothing new to 23-year-old budding Paralympic cyclist Tom Staniford, from Exeter.
He has an extremely rare condition that means he is unable to store fat under his skin.

Although he was born a normal weight, he lost all the fat around his face and limbs during his childhood, and yet his body still thinks he is obese, meaning he has type 2 diabetes. His hearing also deteriorated when he was 10 and he has worn hearing aids since.

Staniford's condition had never been identified - until recently, when a research team set about mapping and analysing his DNA to pinpoint the precise gene mutation responsible.
Finally, Staniford has discovered he is one of just eight people in the world with MDP syndrome.

But he says the diagnosis will have little impact on his daily life because he has worked out a routine that allows him to control his diabetes, study for a degree in law and French, and race his bike while staying healthy.
"But it is reassuring to know that there are other people with the condition and that we can lead relatively normal lives," he says.

However, Staniford's cycling abilities are anything but normal. He was the British national paracycling circuit race champion in 2011 and his ambition is to become Paralympic champion at Rio 2016.
Training at high intensity to fulfil that ambition while coping with his condition has not been easy, he says.

"I have just 40% of the muscles of an average male. I struggle to metabolise sugar and carbohydrates efficiently due to the diabetes - and I struggle to recover due to lack of immediate fuel sources, low testosterone etc.
"My muscles have a very narrow margin of efficiency and they're also tight, stiff and inflexible because I don't have fat to perform that role.
"This is why I have to constantly experiment and attempt to find, through trial and error, what works."

When scientists at the University of Exeter got involved, they used the most recent genome sequencing technology to find out what genetic change had occurred in Staniford.
This was only possible after a second person with the same condition was found.

Prof Andrew Hattersley, senior investigator on the study - published in Nature Genetics - at the medical school at Exeter, says this meant they could compare the genomes of the two patients and their families, who were not affected by the disorder.
He says: "We had to look at thirty million base pairs in Tom's DNA, and similar numbers in his family members and the other patient's, to identify the single mutation.

"Identifying the gene responsible has implications both for predicting the long-term impact of the condition on Tom's health and - equally importantly to him - on his sporting career."

The research team, which included scientists from the University of Cambridge, and from India, Italy and the US, found an abnormality in the POLD1 gene on chromosome 19. They found that a single amino acid was missing from an enzyme that is crucial to DNA replication.
"All Tom's features can be explained by this one specific change," says Prof Hattersley.
"And now we have a diagnostic test for it."

He thinks the genetic mutation would have occurred in the sperm of the athlete's father or very early in Staniford's life.
Armed with this knowledge, he hopes to identify therapies that could help people with this syndrome and find out more about how the body works when it lacks fat in crucial places.

Staniford, however, remains very realistic about how gene therapy could help him.
He finds he can manage his diabetes very effectively using a combination of training, diet and experience.
"Spending so much time on the bike, I essentially use my cycling to self-medicate for diabetes. I find that by eating certain foods and doing certain cycling sessions it gives me much more stable insulin control."

One immediate advantage of the diagnosis is that Staniford will be more accurately classified in paracycling competitions.
"In the past, due to so little being known of my own condition and its effects on my functional cycling ability, I have always been placed in a 'harder' class than perhaps my disability should warrant." he explains.

Staniford is not about to dwell on the rarity of his condition or use it as a reason for reassessing his future cycling ambitions, even though there are very few diabetic athletes around.

"Don't we all possess certain characteristics or groupings of 'symptoms' which only a few others share?
"The only real difference is that my symptoms may be slightly off the beaten track, or unusual in their severity.
"I'm unique - just like everybody else on the planet."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-22903537

Hmm.. Some people are more unique than others! Wink
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PostPosted: 26-06-2013 23:04    Post subject: Reply with quote

Foot Orgasm Syndrome

at work warning: page has names of female body parts.

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/seriouslyscience/2013/06/26/the-tale-of-the-woman-who-had-orgasms-in-her-foot/#.UctzHpzhdPd
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PostPosted: 04-07-2013 18:54    Post subject: Reply with quote

Weird condition caused by brain damage:

Quote:
Mindscapes: First man to hear people before they speak

"I told my daughter her living room TV was out of sync. Then I noticed the kitchen telly was also dubbed badly. Suddenly I noticed that her voice was out of sync too. It wasn't the TV, it was me."

Ever watched an old movie, only for the sound to go out of sync with the action? Now imagine every voice you hear sounds similarly off-kilter – even your own. That's the world PH lives in. Soon after surgery for a heart problem, he began to notice that something wasn't quite right.


http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn23813-mindscapes-first-man-to-hear-people-before-they-speak.html#.UdXEM_ksmSo
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