Forums

 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages 
Animal escapes
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Fortean Times Message Board Forum Index -> Cryptozoology - general
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Mighty_EmperorOffline
Divine Wind
Joined: 18 Aug 2002
Total posts: 19943
Location: Mongo
Age: 43
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 27-02-2004 21:32    Post subject: Animal escapes Reply with quote

We often here the out of palce animal explanation being escapes of exotic animals so here is a thread to track this kind of news:

Quote:
14-Foot Python Still Missing In Neighborhood

Snake Has Not Eaten In 3 Months

POSTED: 4:04 pm EST February 17, 2004
UPDATED: 11:17 am EST February 19, 2004

Residents in Fruitland Park, Fla., are keeping small pets inside and watching their children after a 14-foot reticulated python snake escaped from its cage and remains missing Thursday in their neighborhood, according to Local 6 News.

Viki Miller said that her son's pet snake -- which has not eaten in three months -- pushed its way out of its cage, the knocked out a window screen and vanished into the Ridge Road area neighborhood.

Homeowners in the area said they are scared knowing a large snake is on the loose.

Local 6 News reported that the nature of the snake is that it is aggressive and could strike if cornered.

"She's big enough -- she can take you (reporter) down," Miller said. "She has the strength of five men."

The Lake County Sheriff's Office is not actively searching the area but planned to patrol the area.


http://www.local6.com/news/2853583/detail.html

Emps
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website 
hedgewizard1Offline
Work in progress
Joined: 05 Oct 2003
Total posts: 1129
Gender: Unknown
PostPosted: 01-03-2004 04:21    Post subject: Reply with quote

Today's Gainesville Sun had an interesting article on the various exotic pets that have become permanent residents of south FLorida. There's a population of Nilem monitors in Cape Coral, Burmese pythons in the Everglades (the piece featured a picture of a gator cruising off with one that was going to be lunch), as well as any number of fish and birds and at least 3 species of monkeys.

This beastie in Fruitland Park is probably going to just go native. Or else something got it already. Not only are gators a threat, but there are huge wild pigs in that area as well.
Back to top
View user's profile 
naitakaOffline
Realistic action figure
Joined: 21 Aug 2001
Total posts: 437
Location: Fort Rouille, New France
Gender: Unknown
PostPosted: 01-03-2004 18:02    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lively llama takes it on the lamb

http://www.thesudburystar.com/webapp/sitepages/content.asp?contentid=59809&catname=Local+News

While Greater Sudbury [Ontario] police officers see a lot in the course of their duties, at 2:30 a.m. Saturday they sure didn’t expect to see a llama running near the Lively turnoff.

Sylvie, a nine-month-old llama, was wandering on Regional Road 55 near Hillcrest St., amazingly unharmed.

After catching her, an officer led the lost llama to the nearby Walden Animal Clinic.

While the clinic has taken in its share of lost dogs, cats and wild animals, it had never taken in a lost llama before.

The llama spent the morning in a pen outside the clinic before its owner Sirpa Clendenning discovered she was missing and called the clinic.

Llama and owner were reunited by 11 a.m., none worse for the wear.

She believes someone, perhaps a child, set her pet loose from its shed next to her bungalow on Lloyd Street.

“Kids are always coming up here to see her,” she said.

Clendenning bought Sylvie about five months ago from a farm in Warren.

“I’ve always wanted a llama,” she said. “They’re very intelligent.”

They’re also incredibly friendly and make humming noises when happy. While llamas don’t bite — they only have bottom teeth in their small jaws — they can spit as far as 15 feet.

Clendenning walks all her animals each day, holding the leashes of her two dogs in one hand and the llama in the other. She has even taken her pack from their house on Lloyd Street to get a coffee at the Tim Hortons’ drive-through window.

The dogs get a timbit [small doughnut]. The llama doesn’t.
Back to top
View user's profile 
Mighty_EmperorOffline
Divine Wind
Joined: 18 Aug 2002
Total posts: 19943
Location: Mongo
Age: 43
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 01-03-2004 20:05    Post subject: Reply with quote

hedgewizard wrote:

Today's Gainesville Sun had an interesting article on the various exotic pets that have become permanent residents of south FLorida. There's a population of Nilem monitors in Cape Coral, Burmese pythons in the Everglades (the piece featured a picture of a gator cruising off with one that was going to be lunch), as well as any number of fish and birds and at least 3 species of monkeys.

This beastie in Fruitland Park is probably going to just go native. Or else something got it already. Not only are gators a threat, but there are huge wild pigs in that area as well.


I had a look on their web site:

www.toledoblade.com

but couldn't find much.

I did find this similar report:

Quote:
Article published Saturday, February 28, 2004

14-foot python survives Colburn Street blaze


For the second time in a week, Toledo firefighters came across something surprising while searching buildings after blazes. On Monday, it was a marijuana-growing operation. Yesterday, it was a nearly 14-foot-long Burmese python.

The household pet, found in an enclosed container, survived a fire that began about 11:40 a.m. in the lower unit of a duplex at 958 Colburn St.

The flames spread from the occupied lower unit to the vacant upper unit. It also damaged a neighboring house at 956 Colburn. Damage to both structures was estimated at ,000.

Rodney Ray; his girlfriend, Heidi Kirk, and three children live in the unit where the fire began. They are receiving help from the Greater Toledo Area Chapter of the American Red Cross.


http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20040228/NEWS07/40228001/-1/NEWS
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website 
hedgewizard1Offline
Work in progress
Joined: 05 Oct 2003
Total posts: 1129
Gender: Unknown
PostPosted: 01-03-2004 20:44    Post subject: Reply with quote

Did some tracking, it was a story from the NY Times that the Sun carried. Here it is (to save you all from having to register for their website):

Forget the Gators: Exotic Pets Run Wild in Florida
By ABBY GOODNOUGH

Published: February 29, 2004

IAMI, Feb. 28 — Burmese pythons are wrestling alligators in the Everglades. African monitor lizards, ill tempered and up to seven feet long, are splashing through canals in Cape Coral. Vervet monkeys hang around a car rental lot near Fort Lauderdale; South American monk parakeets wreak havoc on power lines; Cuban tree frogs have colonized everywhere, gobbling native frogs as they go.

The southern end of Florida, the most tropical state outside Hawaii, is teeming with exotic beasts. As if alligators, panthers and other native creatures were not enough, the steamy swamps, murky waterways and lush tree canopies here are a paradise for furry, scaly, clawed, fanged and otherwise off-putting things that have no business roaming this side of the equator.

"This stuff doesn't happen in New Jersey, it doesn't happen in Ohio, but in South Florida it happens constantly," said Todd Hardwick, whose trapping business, Pesky Critters, gets 60 calls a day from people with peacocks on their roofs, caimans in their driveways and iguanas in their tool sheds. "Miami-Dade County is probably ground zero for exotic animals that are on the loose and doing very well."

More imported animals are flown to Miami than any other American city but New York and Los Angeles. Breeders, dealers and owners of exotic pets abound. And when pet lovers find their boa constrictor or spinytail iguana has outgrown its cage, or they move or meet a mate who will not abide anteaters, piranhas or prairie dogs, South Florida presents the perfect dumping ground.

"Any place the public perceives as a large, wild, junglelike environment, that's where you'll see them," said Mr. Hardwick, who said he once caught a 22-foot reticulated python under a house in Fort Lauderdale, where it had retreated after swallowing a raccoon. "Miami is a fast, disposable society, which means whatever is the hot pet today will be my catch of the day next week."

Witness the Nile monitor lizard, dagger-clawed, blue-tongued and voracious. Monitors have multiplied so quickly in the maze of man-made canals around Cape Coral, a fast-growing city on the southwest coast, that a scientist at the University of Tampa won grants last year to study their ecological impact. Thirty-nine monitors have been caught and killed in the region since summer, said Kenneth Krysko, a University of Florida herpetologist assisting with the project.

"There's no question they are expanding their range," Dr. Krysko said. "They are scaring the heck out of residents, there's no question about that." He said the lizards end up abandoned because many pet dealers do not warn buyers how big and difficult they get.

"Any child can go to a pet store and buy a hatchling for $10," Dr. Krysko said. "It's really sad, because this is such a beautiful lizard, just a magnificent species. But no one realizes the ability this animal has to tear off your cat's head with one twist."

Scientists say the lizards do not pose a danger to humans unless they are cornered.

Cape Coral residents also worry that monitors are eating the eggs of burrowing owls, an endangered species that nests in the ground and is abundant, and beloved, in the area. But Dr. Krysko said it was too early to tell, since scientists have not yet examined monitors' stomach contents (the captured lizards are in deep freeze for now).

While Florida has become hypervigilant about the spread of invasive plants and trees like Brazilian pepper and Australian pine, it has been slower to address the problem of non-native animals, said Skip Snow, a wildlife biologist at Everglades National Park.

"When you're talking about things that move around, it's harder to detect them and harder to do something about it," he said. "There has not been an organized campaign to remind people it's not just against the law but terrible for the environment to release these things."

Nor is the pet industry a reliable partner in controlling exotic animals, because many dealers are not knowledgeable, said Jim Stinebaugh, a federal wildlife inspector at Miami International Airport.


Here are some links on other exotics in our lovely state:

http://floridafisheries.com/Fishes/Exotic%20List.html

http://wld.fwc.state.fl.us/critters/exotics/exotics.asp

This second site is really the best. Enjoy!
Back to top
View user's profile 
TheQuixoteOffline
Joined: 25 Sep 2003
Total posts: 4085
Gender: Female
PostPosted: 04-08-2004 17:45    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

Skunk searchers thrown off scent

A search for a skunk is underway in the south Wales valleys - but sniffing him out will be a problem.

Alexander, the 12-week-old south American skunk, escaped through a window of his new owner's house.

But he has been "descented", so is unable to give out the skunk's traditional defensive odour.

Pet shop worker Jonathan Manley from Tonypandy, Rhondda, is desperate for Alexander to come home and is appealing for sightings of him.

Mr Manley, 23, said that Alexander slipped through an open window in the house after managing to climb onto a work top.

Quote:

Alexander is still very nervous and won't come to people but it would be good to know where to start looking
Jonathan Manley


"We have only had him for about four weeks and he is still very shy," explained Mr Manley.

"So I let him out to try and tame him a bit and he managed to climb up onto the surface and got out of an open window.

"We live in the mountains and after he got into the garden he must have got out into the wild."

Alexander, who is described as a black and white "fluffball" is a bit smaller than the size of the average cat.

"My daughter Georgia who is three is missing him a lot and keeps asking where her skunk has gone," said Mr Manley.

"He will survive in the wild because he lives on fruit and veg but I am really worried that a fox or a dog will get him.

"I really hope that dog walkers or horse riders will look out for him for us.

"The only problem is that Alexander is still very nervous and won't come to people but it would be good to know where to start looking.

"He has been descented so smells a bit like a ferret."

Mr Manley said that he has always been fascinated by the creatures and had hoped to be able to take Alexander around local schools to show children.

"We really would like to get him back.

"They are unusual pets but they are becoming more popular now and there are more people breeding them," added Mr Manley.

If anyone spots Alexander please contact Mr Manley on 01443 421 349




BBCi News 04/07/04
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website 
naitakaOffline
Realistic action figure
Joined: 21 Aug 2001
Total posts: 437
Location: Fort Rouille, New France
Gender: Unknown
PostPosted: 04-08-2004 23:21    Post subject: Reply with quote

Subway workers discover large snake on platform

Quote:
It wasn't exactly a thing that went bump in the night. It was more like a hiss. But it took two shocked Toronto Transit Commision maintenance men by surprise.

Even though the subway doesn't run past 2am, that doesn't mean there's not a lot of activity on the tracks. Crews go through the stations into the wee hours, cleaning up the system and making sure everything's ready for the morning rush.

They're used to the usual garbage - discarded food, newspapers, and even the occasional rat in the tunnels.

But the pair traipsing through the Spadina station early Wednesday weren't expecting a huge orange and black snake with diamond shapes on its back, slithering through the northbound platform.

They're not sure where the creature came from, but they didn't let it get too far. They quickly scooped it up in a bag and called for animal control to come and pick it up.

But this snake in the grass -or rather, the bag - had other plans. While the workers were waiting for the experts, the slithering serpent somehow escaped from its makeshift prison, and was last seen disappearing somewhere into the great outdoors in the Annex. Perhaps it reached its stop, after all.


http://www.pulse24.com/News/Top_Story/20040804-005/page.asp
Back to top
View user's profile 
Mal_AdjustedOffline
Hardware Fault
Joined: 06 Aug 2003
Total posts: 1759
Gender: Unknown
PostPosted: 04-10-2004 14:33    Post subject: Lurcher's Houdini routine Reply with quote

Hi

(not exactly exotic animals but still animal escape story!)

source:
---------------------------

Ananova:
14:18 Monday 4th October 2004
http://www.ananova.com/news/story/sm_1127288.html?menu=news.quirkies

quote:
----------------------------

Lurcher's Houdini routine

A dog has been breaking out of his kennel at Battersea Dogs' Home and
releasing his pals for midnight feasts.

The lurcher, called Red, learnt to free himself and his companions to
carry out night raids on the kitchen at the animal shelter in south London.

His escapades came to light when staff set up cameras to discover how the dogs came to be running amok when they arrived in the mornings.

Video pictures showed Red escaping and opening the bolts on the other dogs' kennels. His kennel has now been made more secure.

Becky Blackmore, of Battersea Dog's Home, told GMTV: "It is really amazing because lurchers aren't particularly renowned for their intelligence.

"It is amazing that he has worked out how to get out of his own kennel but then also that he goes and lets all his friends out.

"They had lots of food, lots of fun and games and caused loads of mess."

---------------------

endquote

Mal F
Back to top
View user's profile 
f4nceOffline
Grey
Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Total posts: 12
Gender: Unknown
PostPosted: 06-10-2004 05:55    Post subject: Reply with quote

Suppose it's time to pop my forum cherry here. This is hardly a first-rate scientific account, but...

I used to work at an animal research institute. Nothing of distinction, just animal care and eventual Health and Safety tyranny. Anyways, it was common knowledge around the institute that a group of macaques (monkeys) had escaped into the forest directly east of the facility two decades back. Only a few had been reclaimed, and it's believed that there still may be a healthy tribe of primates living in the Manzano mountains east of Albuquerque. No need for concern, but if anyone living nearby reads this, I can only advise you to hide your bananas, grease up your swingset (deters monkeys like nothing else!) and try to avoid reciting Rupyard Kipling at the top of your lungs in the middle of the night.

You never know who may heed your call.
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website 
LividBullseyeOffline
moomin hunter !
Joined: 08 Mar 2002
Total posts: 1554
Gender: Unknown
PostPosted: 08-10-2004 01:31    Post subject: Reply with quote

f3nce wrote:

I can only advise you to hide your bananas, grease up your swingset


Eek Eek . Something lost in the translation possibly?.
Back to top
View user's profile 
PeniGOffline
Proud children's writer
Joined: 31 Dec 2003
Total posts: 2991
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Age: 53
Gender: Female
PostPosted: 08-10-2004 02:06    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don't British kids get swing sets? Triangular frames with swings and sometimes other similar play equipment hung from the crossbar. F3nce is recommending ways to reduce the damage monkeys can do to your property. I can see where they'd have a wonderful time on a swing set, but if you grease the poles so they can't climb, don't they just jump into the swings and climb the chains? You can't really grease those, 'cause the kids would get it all over their hands.
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website 
LeaferneOffline
Defrost indoors
Joined: 07 Feb 2004
Total posts: 4785
Location: Graceland, mama
Age: 44
Gender: Female
PostPosted: 08-10-2004 02:14    Post subject: Reply with quote

Behold the swing set!

Just remembered that we used to have one in our back yard. Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website 
f4nceOffline
Grey
Joined: 20 Aug 2004
Total posts: 12
Gender: Unknown
PostPosted: 09-10-2004 20:25    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I can see where they'd have a wonderful time on a swing set, but if you grease the poles so they can't climb, don't they just jump into the swings and climb the chains?


Observation has shown that primates are far from monogamous, so I've found that it's simply best not to interfere with their natural swinging tendencies...
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website 
LividBullseyeOffline
moomin hunter !
Joined: 08 Mar 2002
Total posts: 1554
Gender: Unknown
PostPosted: 09-10-2004 20:38    Post subject: Reply with quote

f3nce wrote:

Observation has shown that primates are far from monogamous, so I've found that it's simply best not to interfere with their natural swinging tendencies...


Quite right, if anyone tried to interfere with my tendencies I'd get more than a touch annoyed..................ahh.........the other primates.........see what you mean.............mines the long black leather coat,third hook from the left..............Wink
Back to top
View user's profile 
Mighty_EmperorOffline
Divine Wind
Joined: 18 Aug 2002
Total posts: 19943
Location: Mongo
Age: 43
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 21-10-2004 16:53    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Five Wildebeests Escape From Ind. Zoo


Oct 19, 10:20 PM (ET)

FORT WAYNE, Ind. (AP) - Zookeepers, police and animal control officers followed five runaway wildebeests through a residential area Tuesday after they escaped from the Fort Wayne Children's Zoo.

Animal handlers were herding the zoo's seven wildebeests toward a barn where they are kept during the winter when five of the animals bolted, according to a press release from the zoo. The animals broke through a gate and jumped over a 4-foot-high fence and emerged onto a city street.

Wildebeests, which are native to eastern Africa, weigh between 300 and 400 pounds and can run up to 50 mph.

Zookeepers and officers in vehicles and on bicycles followed the wildebeests down the street, through a trailer park and an apartment complex.

Two of the animals that broke their front legs were euthanized after they were recaptured, zoo veterinarian Joe Smith said. The others were cornered in a back yard near a church.

Officials then shot the animals with tranquilizer darts and returned them to the zoo, according to the news release.

The wildebeests are a featured attraction at the Children's Zoo's African Veldt exhibit.


http://apnews.excite.com/article/20041020/D85QSMM80.html
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website 
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Fortean Times Message Board Forum Index -> Cryptozoology - general All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
Page 1 of 6

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group