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World's oldest people
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Anonymous
PostPosted: 05-12-2002 21:52    Post subject: 125 Year Old Woman Reply with quote

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/2543879.stm
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Anonymous
PostPosted: 06-12-2002 19:36    Post subject: Reply with quote

"No single subject is more obscured by vanity, deceit, falsehood or deliberate fraud than the extremes of human longevity" - Guinness Book of Records.
Dare I say it - she's probably not that old at all. I don't mean to be rude or offhand, but, in a polite and courteous way, it's probably just a mistake, especially in a country like Mali, where people are not well nourished as a rule. I've just looked up my atlas, and the life expectancy of a woman in Mali is 48 years. This is not to say it's impossible, but it's probably economical with the truth.
Not so many years ago there was a stir about the longevity of people in a place called Vilcabamba, in Ecuador. There were said to be dozens of people over 100 in one town, including one Albertano Roa, aged 119, who was still smoking, drinking, and digging the garden. Frankly it turned out to be tosh.
An interesting point here is that there is no reliable scientific way of dating any part of the human body. So without a birth certificate and other evidence, well, I'm afraid it's apocryphal.
Then again, I could be wrong.

Big Bill Robinson
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Anonymous
PostPosted: 29-09-2003 16:31    Post subject: World's oldest man dies again Reply with quote

TOKYO, Japan (AP) -- Yukichi Chuganji, a retired silkworm breeder documented as the world's oldest man, has died at his home in Japan at age 114.

Chuganji was pronounced dead from natural causes Sunday evening, his 65-year old nephew, Tadao Haji, said on Monday.

Bedridden in recent years, Chuganji had been living with his 72-year-old daughter Kyoko in the city of Ogori, about 890 kilometers (550 miles) southwest of Tokyo.

He had just finished drinking some apple juice when his family noticed he wasn't looking well, Haji said.

"As always, he had been thanking everyone for taking such good care of him and for cooking his meals," Haji said of Chuganji's last day.

Chuganji was born March 23, 1889 in the farming town of Chikushino on Japan's southernmost main island of Kyushu. He worked as a silkworm breeder and adviser after graduating from technical school in the early 1900s.

He liked to eat beef and pork with his meals of rice and miso soup. He would drink milk everyday but didn't consume alcohol.

Kyushu is also home to the world's oldest person, a 116-year-old woman named Kamato Hongo.

There are an estimated 15,000 Japanese over the age of 100, and women make up about 80 percent of the total.

Japan's life expectancy is the longest in the world for both sexes -- 85.23 years for women and 78.32 for men in 2002. The country's traditional fish-based, lowfat diet may be the secret to the long lives, researchers say.
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Mighty_EmperorOffline
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PostPosted: 17-10-2003 14:53    Post subject: Rollies the secret of a long life? Reply with quote

Quote:
Man Smokes His Way to 122 Years -- Maybe


TUK YOUNG (Reuters) - In a creaking bamboo hut deep in the Cambodian countryside a very, very old person -- possibly the world's oldest -- smokes a large, hand-rolled cigarette which he swears is the secret of his longevity.



But unfortunately for Sek Yi, whose relatives say he is 122, he will never be able to win a world record for his tiny corner of southeast Asia because all his documents were destroyed by Pol Pot's ultra-Maoist Khmer Rouge (news - web sites) in the 1970s.

"We wish him well, but, sadly, we have to have strict verification for all our records," said a spokeswoman for Guinness World Records in London.

Having survived the horrors of the "Killing Fields," in which an estimated 1.7 million were executed or died of torture, disease or starvation, Sek Yi and his equally wizened wife, Long Ouk, 108, can only muse on the causes of their extreme longevity -- a mixture of tobacco and prayer.

"When I was young I used to chew betel, but people made fun of me saying I was like a woman, so I took up smoking," Sek Yi told Reuters in a barely audible croak.

"To live a long time, young people should go to the pagoda often and lead a pure life," his wife said. "Every time I pray I ask the Lord Buddha to look after my children and help them live long."

The couple now have just one final wish -- to visit the famed 800-year-old Angkor Wat temples, Cambodia's national treasure.

"They had planned to go to Angkor several times, but something always happened, like war or fighting, which prevented them going," said 13th daughter Siek Yiet, 62.

According to Guinness World Records, the world's oldest living person is Kamato Hongo, a 116-year-old Japanese woman. Guinness says the greatest fully authenticated age to which any human has lived is the 122 years and 164 days of Frenchwoman Jeanne Calment, who died in 1997.


http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=573&ncid=757&e=1&u=/nm/20031017/od_nm/old_dc
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Mighty_EmperorOffline
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PostPosted: 20-10-2003 21:24    Post subject: Or not!! Reply with quote

Oh well he didn't last long Sad

And view the power of recycling older reports!!

Quote:
Cambodian tiger hunter dies at maybe 122

Mon Oct 20, 3:05 AM ET


PHNOM PENH (Reuters) - A Cambodian tiger hunter and martial arts exponent believed to be the world's oldest person has died peacefully in his sleep after a brief illness, his relatives say.



Having survived the horrors of the "Killing Fields" genocide in the 1970s, Sek Yi, whose relatives believe he was 122 years old, was revered across the deeply impoverished southeast Asian nation on account of his unusually advanced years.

Unfortunately all his documents were destroyed by Pol Pot's ultra-Maoist Khmer Rouge (news - web sites) guerrillas, forever denying him the possibility of setting an official world record.

"If you wish to pay your respects, please come today," one of his many granddaughters told Reuters. "He died peacefully on Sunday morning after a few days of illness."

Sek Yi will be buried on Monday afternoon near his creaking bamboo hut in the tiny village of Tuk Young, nestled near the border with neighbouring Vietnam around 200 km east of the capital, Phnom Penh.

In an interview with Reuters five days before he died, Sek Yi and his equally wizened wife Long Ouk, 108, attributed their longevity to a combination of tobacco and prayer.

"When I was young I used to chew betel, but people made fun of me saying I was like a woman, so I took up smoking," he said in a barely audible croak.

Guinness World Records says the world's oldest living person is Kamato Hongo, a 116-year-old Japanese woman.

The oldest fully authenticated age to which any human has lived is the 122 years and 164 days of Frenchwoman Jeanne-Louise Calment, who died in 1997.


http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=857&ncid=757&e=10&u=/nm/20031020/od_uk_nm/oukoe_life_cambodia_oldest
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mejane1Offline
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PostPosted: 20-10-2003 23:10    Post subject: Reply with quote

The human Schodinger's cat... neither alive nor dead until someone checks.

Whatever the truth, he obviously lived in interesting times... poor sod.

Jane.
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PostPosted: 20-10-2003 23:20    Post subject: Reply with quote

Everytime there is a report of the oldest man or woman they are always asked to what do they attribute their old age to.

Instead of saying the obvious answer " I failed to die for longer than anyone else" they mention some generally insignificant aspect of their diet or any other regular activity that comes to mind. Probably the first thing that comes into their head - usually a daily activity like eating orr drinking......This is then leapt upon by the reporter as a newly discovered elixir of longevity....


Really they should do proper scientifc trials -

Anyone know where we can find several hundred 120 year olds?


Last edited by Rrose_Selavy on 20-10-2003 23:22; edited 1 time in total
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YithianOffline
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PostPosted: 21-10-2003 00:51    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rrose Selavy wrote:

Anyone know where we can find several hundred 120 year olds?


A graveyard? The Galapagos Islands - though most of those chaps have shells...
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Anonymous
PostPosted: 31-10-2003 15:42    Post subject: Reply with quote

World's oldest person snuffs it again:

A Japanese woman believed to be the world's oldest person has died aged 116.
Kamato Hongo died in hospital on Friday, one of her grandsons said.

Mrs Hongo, who lived on the island of Tokunoshima in southern Japan, had been bed-ridden for some time.

She had seven children and at least 27 grandchildren.

The world's oldest person is now believed to be 114-year-old Mitoyo Kawate, a Japanese woman living in Hiroshima.

Japanese longevity

Mrs Hongo was well-known throughout Japan for her habit of sleeping for two days and then staying awake for two days.

Her grandson Tsuyoshi Karauchi, who lived with her, told the BBC last month that sleeping was a favourite pastime for his grandmother.

"We even feed her in her sleep," he told the East Asia Today programme.

Mr Karauchi said his grandmother, like a lot of other elderly people, ate miso soup, rice and vegetables.

Asked about the secret of her longevity, he said: "She was brought up in a good environment, ate healthy local food. She survived the war but apart from that it's been a peaceful happy life."

She has never smoked, he said, "but she did start drinking about 20 years ago in her 90s".

Japanese have the longest life expectancy in the world. Their diet of fish and green vegetables is thought to contribute to their longevity.

Economists are predicting a crisis in the state pension system within a few years, because the benefits being paid out far exceed payments being made into it.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/3230083.stm
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oll_lewisOffline
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PostPosted: 15-11-2003 02:30    Post subject: Worlds oldest person dies Reply with quote

Quote:
World's oldest person dies at 114
The world's oldest person has died in Japan at the age of 114.
Mitoyo Kawate died of pneumonia at a hospital in the southwestern city of Hiroshima, Japanese officials said.

She was recognised by the Guinness World Records as the oldest person on 31 October, shortly after the death of fellow Japanese Kamato Hongo, aged 116.

It was not immediately clear who is now the world's oldest person, but it is believed that a 113-year old US woman may have taken the crown.

According to the Guinness World Records, Charlotte Benkner of North Lima, Ohio, will celebrate her 114th birthday on 16 November.

The website of the London-based organisation also records the oldest man whose birth can be fully authenticated as Joan Riudavets Moll, a 113-year-old man from Spain.

It says that the family of Hava Rexha, an Albanian woman believed to be 123 years old, has also claimed the title.

But after her death earlier this month, the Guinness World Records could not complete the authentication of her birth documents.

Japanese longevity

Mitoyo Kawate was born on 15 May 1889 - less than a month after Adolf Hitler and in the same year as the Eiffel Tower was completed in Paris.


Kawate, who had four children, was a farmer in Hiroshima until she turned 100, a spokesman for Hiroshima city, Masatoshi Yamada, was quoted as saying by the Associated Press news agency.

The spokesman said she is survived by a son and a daughter, but did not provide any details about her grandchildren.

Kawate especially liked custard cakes and singing, a caretaker from a nursing home where she had been living for the last 10 years said earlier this month.

After her death, Japan's oldest woman was now 113-year-old Ura Koyama from the southwestern city of Fukuoka, a Japanese Health Ministry official said.

Japan leads the world in longevity, with the life expectancy averaging 85 years for women, and 78 years for men.

The country's traditional diet of fish and green vegetables is thought to contribute to their longevity.

Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/asia-pacific/3268151.stm

Published: 2003/11/13 18:57:09 GMT

© BBC MMIII
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Anome_Offline
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PostPosted: 15-11-2003 10:49    Post subject: Reply with quote

I thought the oldest person in the world died a couple of months back. How come she keeps dying?
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oll_lewisOffline
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PostPosted: 15-11-2003 16:58    Post subject: Reply with quote

thats why they're the worlds oldest person, presumeably...

"oh, I appear to have shuffled off this mortol coil..."

"yay, now we can finally collect great-great-grannys inheritance !"

"AHA! thats your game, I wasen't really dead I was just pretending you ungreatful sods! ye'll nay get a penny outa me! I outlived yer money grubbing forefathers I'll out live ye an all!"
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PostPosted: 18-01-2004 01:13    Post subject: "Namibia's oldest granny dies 'at 126'" Reply with quote

From the Namibian newspaper. Note that while the article claims she is 126, her birthdate is given as Xmas Day 1878, which would have made her 125 when she died. - Zane

Wednesday, January 14, 2004 - Web posted at 7:23:34 GMT

Namibia's oldest granny dies 'at 126'

CHRISTOF MALETSKY
NAMIBIA'S oldest person, Anna Visser, died on Thursday in the Sacred Heart Hospice at Mariental.




She was said to be about 126 years old.

Her grandchildren at Asab, in the south of Namibia, were yesterday making arrangements for her funeral which is scheduled to take place on Saturday.

According to birth records in the possession of the family, granny Visser, also known as Ouma Fransman, was born on Christmas day in 1878 at farm !Khai //Gamites [Kouewater] in the Keetmanshoop district.

Three years ago, when she still lived with her grandchildren at Asab, President Sam Nujoma paid a special visit to Visser and donated N$5 000 to the country's then most senior citizen.

According to the Guinness World Records the oldest person, a Japanese man, was around 115 years old.

Although Ouma Fransman was born at !Khai //Gamites, she spent her childhood at Keetmanshoop, Sasaos and at Gochas.

She was about 15 years old when the war between the Namas and the Germans broke out.

Ouma Fransman was captured along with her mother and sister and taken to Keetmanshoop where they were detained in a concentration camp.

She will be laid to rest on Saturday along with Adam Isaacks, a son of her grandchild, who died in a car accident.
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PostPosted: 19-01-2004 02:26    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Sunday January 18, 12:51 PM

Could this be the world's oldest woman?

MOSCOW (Reuters) - A Chechen great-great-grandmother born in 1881 could be the oldest woman in the world, Russian state television reports, saying she pipped the current record holder by eight years.

Pasikhat Dzhukalayeva has nine grandchildren, 18 great-grandchildren, and seven great-great-grandchildren who call her 'Granny Asi'.

"I do not know why I have lived so long. I have buried five brothers and sisters, and four children," the wrinkled Dzhukalayeva, who moves around in a wheelchair, told Rossiya television. She showed off a passport giving her year of birth.

If 122 as claimed, Dzhukalayeva would have been in her thirties during World War One and Russia's 1917 revolution, and already in her sixties when Soviet dictator Josef Stalin deported most of the Chechen people to Central Asia in 1944.

The most long-lived person with reliable documentation is believed to have been France's Jeanne-Louise Calment, who died at 122.

According to the Guinness Book of Records, the world's oldest living woman is U.S. citizen Charlotte Benkner, who was born in Germany in late 1889 -- a mere 113 years ago.

According to Guinness, the oldest living man is Joan Riudavets Moll from Spain, who was born less than a month after Benkner in 1889, the year Adolf Hitler was born.


http://uk.news.yahoo.com/040118/325/ejpkj.html
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Mighty_EmperorOffline
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PostPosted: 21-01-2004 16:39    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting stuff about his family:

Quote:
The world's oldest man

Giles Tremlett meets Joan Riudavets, aged 114, and still going strong

Wednesday January 21, 2004
The Guardian

The oldest man in the world is standing up in his front room, slightly bent over and sagging at the knees, dressed in his winter best. Joan Riudavets, 114 last month, is wearing a flat cap and tie, his multiple layers of jerseys topped with a blue Lacoste cardigan. Joan believes guests should get the warmest possible welcome. And that, whatever the doctor says, means standing up and shaking hands. "I'm fine," he says in Spanish, politely waving away the offer of an arm.

His daughter, Paca, arrives back from the shop in Es Migjorn, the village on the island of Menorca where Joan has lived, in the same street, since he was born. "He is meant to stay sitting down when I go out. He does not always obey," she apologises.

Joan, however, is sticking to one of the few bits of advice he gives those who seek the secret of his longevity: "Keep moving, keep going forward." He insists, in fact, that he does not feel old enough to be breaking records. "They say I am the grandfather of the world," he chuckles. "I could not really believe it when they told me. My body does not hurt me at all. I am 114 years old but I still do not know what a headache feels like. Look! My pulse is steady. I can still hold a pen and write perfectly well."

He chats animatedly, gesticulating and clenching his hands. His words get gargled on the way up his throat, and can be difficult to capture. From time to time he loses the thread of conversation, but he is, mostly, on the ball.

Joan made it into the record books last September, when Yukichi Chuganji, of Japan, died at the age of 114 years and 139 days. His contemporaries, also born in 1889, included Charles Chaplin and Adolf Hitler. The Eiffel Tower was finished the same year, Queen Victoria sat on the British throne and Jack the Ripper was still on the prowl.

His recipe for lasting so long has little to do with diets or exercise routines and lots to do with the inner self. "Live calmly and treat other people well," he advises as we tuck into glasses of sweet, strong muscatel wine and Paca's pastisets , doughy, home-made biscuits. He has always drunk a bit, like this, but only in moderation. He gave up smoking in 1922, when he was 33. "I was never one of those who smoked all the time anyway. "

He may not consider it important, but Joan is a walking advertisement for the Mediterranean diet. "I eat anything," he says. "Chickpeas and beans, fruit and vegetables, meat and fish. But, whatever it is, I like it well cooked."

Joan would like to have been a football player. But, like so many other things, the game had not been invented when he was born. Or, rather, it had not come to Menorca. He was 12 when Real Madrid was founded. "Es Migjorn was the first place in Menorca to include football in its summer fiestas," he recalls proudly. "But that was in the mid-1920s." Joan was in his mid-30s.

Much of what we take for granted had not been invented when Joan was born. Radio, commercially produced cars, aeroplanes, even zips, had not made it off the drawing board, let alone to a remote Mediterranean island. He remembers the island's first car. "It went too fast and crashed, turned right over," he laughs.

Electricity, however, remains his choice for the greatest invention introduced to Es Migjorn during his life. "I had read about it and seen it in Menorca's capital, in Mahon. But that really changed everything," he said. It also provided him with a new form of entertainment - switching the neighbours' supply off.

Joan never learned to drive, but was the proud owner of a bicycle. On an island the size of Menorca, only 50 km long, that is all you need. "I always liked movement," he explains, his arms jigging backwards and forwards. "I loved cycling and I liked swimming and dancing too. I liked dancing the fandango best."

His greatest love of all, though, has been music. "I learned to play guitar and the violin when I was young. It was my best pastime. When there was no work to be done, that was what I liked doing."

He started working in the family's shoe-making workshop as a child and retired in the 1950s. In those days, he explained, you did what your father told you. "We never lacked work. We have been very fortunate," he says.

He still remembers half a dozen men from the village being called up to go to the war in Cuba in 1898 - just as Britain was about to embark on the second Boer war. Spain lost that one, and the last of its American colonies. "Some never came back. And those who did were ill for the rest of their lives," he said. "The family of one of them spent six years in mourning. And then he suddenly reappeared. Maybe he did not know how to write."

Joan was one of the few villagers who learned to write. He would like to have studied more and become a doctor or teacher. "I liked school," he said. "But I had to work with my father." He was an obedient son. "One reason I learned to read was that I woke up one morning and there was a book in my room. I took that as a sign from my father that he wanted me to learn."

His biggest regret, even now, is that he never met his mother. She died 15 days after he was born, aged 24. There was no photograph of her. "I have always regretted that, and more so as time goes by," he says. The Riudavets are unusually long-lived. Pere, a brother, lives a few doors down the same street. He is a mere stripling at 103. "He's stone deaf," explains Paca. "But he could probably run down the street if he wanted to." The youngest brother lives in Mahon. At 98, he hardly counts as old by family standards.

Scientists from Boston have visited with their syringes, looking for genetic secrets to the Riudavets' longevity, though none has come to a conclusion. The Guinness Book of Records keeps files on some 40 registered supercentenarians, aged over 110. The names of record-holders, and those in pursuit, are constantly being renewed.

When Joan became the world's oldest man in September, he was still only its fourth oldest person - a record traditionally held by a woman. But, within a few weeks, the Japanese winter had killed off both 116-year-old Kamato Hongo and 114-year-old Mitoyo Kowate. That left only Charlotte Benkner from Ohio, just 25 days older than Joan, as the world's oldest person; then she, too, died.

Joan has become something of a celebrity, even a tourist attraction. His favourite visit, though, was from the local schoolchildren. "They asked me what I did all day. I told them I was a layabout, but that they should study," he said. He was not joking. Joan spends 15-hour stretches in bed most nights. He likes lying there, going through his memories. "It's where I feel best," he says.

Doing the right thing, or behaving properly, have been lifelong concerns. "I have always to tried to think well of people. I have never lied, or at least not with intent," he says.

Even now, as death approaches, his biggest worry is that everybody should be "satisfied" with him. "I think a lot about the things I should do well so I can leave my family happy and satisfied. I do not want them to be discontent with me," he says.

I wonder what those scientists will find in his genes. Perhaps they are looking in the wrong place. Joan's secret, I suspect, lies in the heart.


http://www.guardian.co.uk/g2/story/0,3604,1127420,00.html
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