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The Bermuda Triangle
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Jerry_BOffline
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PostPosted: 16-03-2004 11:55    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, that depends if there are indeed any 'facts' behind these 'mysteries'...

A scientist trying to come up with some explanation for the Traingle is perhaps just as mislead as others into thinking that anything that's alleged to have happened in that area has actually taken place.
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DarrenDawsonOffline
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PostPosted: 16-03-2004 15:12    Post subject: Another angle to all this, ref ship not planes disappearing Reply with quote

If memory serves, there have been reports of 'mega waves'.

These measure apporx 60-70ft but may well be larger. They seem to originate far out to see and have rarely been seen. Indeed many scientists dimissed the old seamen's tales as myth.

However I recoall an article on the bbc or newscientist website that told the tale of Germany's 2nd largest aircraft carrier. This was sunk without trace a year or so ago by one of these mega waves.

My proposition is couldn't they take out low flying planes and obviously any sea vessels in their path?

Also what do they do to the atmoshere above them in term of pressure wave fronts etc. (or it it the pressure that creates the waves? can't remember).

Just my two pennies.

As for the flight in question. imo it was pilot error/mechanical failure that caused then to go missing.

btw methane out gassing from the sea bed is killing off masses of fish stocks off the coast off Africa. The effect would definately change the properties of the water and could well sink a ship due to the change in water density.
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Philo_TOffline
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PostPosted: 16-03-2004 15:46    Post subject: Reply with quote

AndroMan wrote:

There was some footage from the 1990's of a North Sea Oil rig tilted over and nearly swallowed up by just such a release of gas on the programme. It get's a mention in the article below. So there is some evidence of sinking due to a methane 'blowout'.

New Scientist: 'Swallowing Ships' 29 November 00

There was a picture to go with the article:


AndroMan:
Now to be totally honest, IIRC, that oil rig triggered the release itself due to its drilling operations. This wasn't a spontaneous release of methane from the seabed.
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Anonymous
PostPosted: 02-07-2004 22:50    Post subject: Reply with quote

Was discussing the Triangle with someone at lunch and before I could get the full statement out he said precisely what I was thinking. The conversation went something like:

(basic chit chat about travel and flying, with a seque into "hope you don't fly over the Bermuda Triangle")

Me: Well, I gather there's far more boats have "disappeared" in that area than planes. What I don't understand is why people don't think of the simplest explanation, which is, given the history of the area..

Him (breaking in excitedly): pirates! Most of those boats were probably pirated. Didn't Peter Benchley write a novel about that? {edit: yes. The Island } I'd bet that all the things that made that area a hotbed for pirates a long time ago still apply.

Me: Yep. Sea lanes busy enough to keep the flow of goods and money coming; slow enough that a boat being pirated wouldn't be like to be seen....Oh yeah.

A good conversation (since it validated my viewpoint Very Happy )


Interesting that few if any of the books or documentataries on that region mention this as a possible reason. As for planes, the Triangle is right were planes coming out of a busy section of the US east coast fly. It is part of a flight corridor. Hel-lo! Statistically there will be more downed planes there just as, statistically, a busy freeway has more accidents per mile than a lonely old country road. Cool
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Anonymous
PostPosted: 06-07-2004 16:36    Post subject: Bermuda Triangle - Last Words? Reply with quote

Hi,
I've been asked if I can find out something about the BM. Apparently one story has the pilot of a plane uttering a strange word over his radio and then nothing else was heard. This word was apparently completely unknown even after extensive research. The person who asked me said that he thinks a paranormal mag used this word as its title.
Any ideas what it could be?


Last edited by Guest on 06-07-2004 16:58; edited 1 time in total
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MrRINGOffline
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PostPosted: 06-07-2004 16:50    Post subject: Reply with quote

CHECK HERE - it may have a mention on this...
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SoundDust
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PostPosted: 06-07-2004 16:54    Post subject: Reply with quote

there's one I can think of, but it wasn't the Bermuda Triangle, the word was "STENDEC" repeated over and over.

I'll try and find details
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SoundDust
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PostPosted: 06-07-2004 16:55    Post subject: Reply with quote

It was in the Andes . . .

Horizon did a programme on it, the transcript is here

Quote:

On August 2nd 1947, a British civilian version of the wartime Lancaster bomber took off from Buenos Aires airport on a scheduled flight to Santiago. There were 5 crew and 6 passengers on board the plane - named "Stardust". But Stardust never made it to Santiago. Instead it vanished when it was apparently just a few minutes from touchdown. One final strange morse code radio message - "STENDEC" - was sent, but after that nothing more was heard from the plane.
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Anonymous
PostPosted: 06-07-2004 17:08    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cheers Jima. Spot on Smile
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soaringspiritOffline
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PostPosted: 11-07-2004 11:17    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well they found the aircraft....but I still have'nt seen a convincing explanation of STENDEC, although it being an anagram for descent is interesting.confused
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Mighty_EmperorOffline
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PostPosted: 22-09-2004 03:02    Post subject: Reply with quote

Spotted this (nice keywords!!):

''Can a Single Bubble Sink a Ship?''
Deming D.
Journal of Scientific Exploration, 1 June 2004, vol. 18, iss. 2, pp. 307-312

Quote:
Abstract:
Anomalies are the source of all scientific investigation and discovery. The mysterious disappearance of ships at sea has long been recognized as a standard type of anomaly. A new theory proposes that the catastrophic release of giant methane bubbles from the ocean floor can possibly account for the disappearance of some ships. The theory is both novel and plausible. However it has limited applicability.

Keywords: ANOMALIES; BERMUDA TRIANGLE; CHARLES FORT; THOMAS KUHN; METHANE
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Jerry_BOffline
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PostPosted: 22-04-2005 12:50    Post subject: 'The Flight 19 Appreciation Group' website Reply with quote

I just found out about this:

http://www.flight19appreciationgroup.org/
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rynner2Online
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PostPosted: 13-09-2009 22:46    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bermuda Triangle plane mystery 'solved'

Two of the so-called Bermuda Triangle's most mysterious disappearances in the late 1940s may have been solved.

Scores of ships and planes are said to have vanished without trace over the decades in a vast triangular area of ocean with imaginary apexes in Bermuda, Florida and Puerto Rico.

But a new examination for a BBC series provides plausible explanations for the disappearance of two British commercial planes in the area, with the loss of 51 passengers and crew.

One plane probably suffered from catastrophic technical failure as a result of poor design, while the other is likely to have run out of fuel.

Sixty years ago, commercial flights from London to Bermuda were new and perilous. It would require a refuelling stop on the Azores before the 2,000-mile flight to Bermuda, which at that time was the longest non-stop commercial overseas flight in the world.

The planes would have been operating at the limit of their range. Today planes arriving at the tiny Atlantic island deep sufficient reserve fuel to divert to the US East Coast 700 miles away, in case of emergency.

And the planes of the post-war era were far less reliable than today's airliners.

British South American Airways (BSAA), which operated the route, had a grim safety record. In three years it had had 11 serious accidents and lost five planes with 73 passengers and 22 crew members killed.

On 30 January 1948, a BSAA Avro Tudor IV plane disappeared without trace. Twenty five passengers and a crew of six were on board The Star Tiger. No bodies or wreckage were found.

The official investigation into the disappearance concluded: "It may truly be said that no more baffling problem has ever been presented.

"What happened in this case will never be known and the fate of Star Tiger must remain an unsolved mystery."

But there are a number of clues in the official accident report that reveal the Star Tiger had encountered problems before it reached the Azores.

The aircraft's heater was notoriously unreliable and had failed en route, and one of the compasses was found to be faulty.

Probably to keep the plane warmer, the pilot had decided to fly the whole trans-Atlantic route very low, at 2,000 feet, burning fuel at a faster rate.

On approaching Bermuda, Star Tiger was a little off course and had been flying an hour later than planned.

In addition, the official Ministry of Civil Aviation report considered that the headwinds faced by Star Tiger may have been much stronger than those forecasted. This would have caused the fuel to burn more quickly.

"Flying at 2,000 feet they would have used up much more fuel," said Eric Newton, one of the Ministry of Civil Aviation's most senior air accident investigators, who reviewed the scenario for the BBC.

"At 2,000 feet you'd be leaving very little altitude for manoeuvre. In any serious in-flight emergency they could have lost their height in seconds and gone into the sea."

Whatever happened to the plane, it was sudden and catastrophic - there was no time to send an emergency signal.

The Avro Tudor IV was a converted warplane that was eventually taken out of passenger service because of its poor safety record. Only BSAA continued to fly the aircraft.

Gordon Store was chief pilot and manager of operations at BSAA. In an interview with his local newspaper last November, he said he had no confidence in the Tudor's engines.

"Its systems were hopeless… all the hydraulics, the air conditioning equipment and the recycling fans were crammed together underneath the floor without any thought. There were fuel burning heaters that would never work," he said.

etc...

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/8248334.stm
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rynner2Online
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PostPosted: 03-08-2010 16:58    Post subject: Reply with quote

TV tonight:

Bermuda Triangle: Mystery Revealed

Revealing documentary following scientists as they embark upon a world-first dangerous expedition beneath the sea to uncover the secrets of the notorious Bermuda Triangle. Laden with sonars and satellite surveys, the divers attempt to investigate the triangle from the bottom up, and they make some startling discoveries along the way. SUB
Documentary

Today on FIVE from 8:00pm to 9:00pm
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rynner2Online
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PostPosted: 03-08-2010 21:38    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not a very informative programme, although the undersea topography was good to see.

Waffling on about the North Atlantic Gyre was a bit irrelevent - the fastest part of this is the Gulf Stream, which flows up past Florida, as has been well known for centuries. And a strong current combined with storm winds can create bad situations.

There were errors of fact too - a sailing ship was described as a 'three masted brig', but there ain't no such animal - a BRIG by definition is a two-masted vessel. (If the pics they showed of the Marques were correct, then the vessel was a brigantine.)

And the stuff abut solar flares failed to address why they should impact the 'Bermuda Triangle' more than other places.

The idea that the infamous Flight 19 crashed in a swamp in Florida also didn't discuss why five planes should go down there without any survivors.

I'd like to bang a few heads together!
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