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kroboneOffline
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PostPosted: 28-04-2005 18:22    Post subject: Extinct bird found in Arkansas Reply with quote

A woodpecker thought to be extinct for 60 years is re-discovered:

Quote:
A group of wildlife scientists believe the ivory-billed woodpecker is not extinct. They say they have made seven firm sightings of the bird in central Arkansas. The landmark find caps a search that began more than 60 years ago, after biologists said North America’s largest woodpecker had become extinct in the United States.
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rossba1Offline
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PostPosted: 28-04-2005 20:07    Post subject: Reply with quote

this has put me in a very good mood! What a fantastic rediscovery. The ivorybill is a magnificent creature. There is even film of it (though blurry) on the Science website (im not sure if its public access but if someone shows me i can try and mount the .mov file)
The history of its supposed extinction is interesting and sad. The last patch of wood in mississippi where it was found in the 20s was sold to the Singer corporation who cut down all the trees- despite knowing that it was the last habitat for the bird. That was the last we knew of it till some of the same species were spotted in Cuban forest. They were never properly studied or conserved (US/cuba tension etc.). Until today the only evidence it had existed were skins, bones and some nice video footage from the 20s. It was one of the few "extinct" species to have the dubious honour of being recorded on film. Fantastic news that it is still here!
edit: On a related note I was in Louisiana in 2003 and went on a Bayou tour run by a proper cajun family. The guy that run the boat was about 80 years old and it was just him, my family and me on the boat. We asked him if he thought there were any ivorybills left. His reply: "yes, but they're very rare". I didnt think to ask him if hed ever seen one
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lopaka3Offline
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PostPosted: 28-04-2005 20:39    Post subject: Reply with quote

And just to clarify for anyone who saw the headline and maybe read just a paragraph or two...this is a huge-ass bird (by woodpecker standards) we're talking about...as big as/bigger than a crow. Curiously (or not) the places where one would hear speculation about its' possible existence was in the I'on Swamp in South Caroilna, the Big Thicket (Texas) and Louisiana. Arkansas is well within its' historical range, but I hadn't been aware that the mature bottomland forest that it requires was still found there in any quantity. (unless this new evidence shows that they can adapt to secondary growth situations, which would be really exciting.)
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Anonymous
PostPosted: 04-05-2005 18:53    Post subject: Reply with quote

source
Three Snails Thought Extinct Discovered
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - Three snails listed as extinct have been rediscovered in the Coosa and Cahaba rivers, the Nature Conservancy announced Tuesday.

Jeff Garner, the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources' mollusk biologist, rediscovered the cobble elimia and the nodulose Coosa River snail on a dive in the Coosa River.

Stephanie Clark, a University of Alabama postdoctoral student from Australia, stumbled onto a Cahaba pebblesnail on a trip to the Cahaba River in Bibb County.

The findings, being announced by the Nature Conservancy, were reported Tuesday by The Birmingham News.

Alabama is known to be the nation's top spot for extinct and imperiled mollusks, the snails and mussels in river beds. Many were lost as dams were built along the Coosa River from 1917 to 1967, when it became a series of reservoirs.

In recent years, scientists have discovered some species hiding in the streams between reservoirs where the Coosa retains some of its original habitat.

Garner went diving below Lake Logan Martin and found two species that had not been spotted since the dams changed the river. Clark was accompanying a graduate student to the Cahaba River National Wildlife Refuge when she found the Cahaba pebblesnail that had not been spotted since 1965.

Garner, who has found several other species believed to be extinct, knew what he had immediately.

"One of these I found is pretty distinctive," Garner told the News. "I've always said it was my favorite snail — I hated it was extinct. It sort of has teardrops around the periphery."

Clark, who began postdoctoral research at the University of Alabama last year, didn't know what she had found at first.

"Behold, there was this oddball snail under a rock," Clark said. "I didn't know that I'd found an extinct one straightaway, but I knew I'd found something that I hadn't seen before."

The Cahaba pebblesnail — round, yellow, only about a quarter of an inch long — had not been spotted since 1965.


edited by TheQuixote: created hyperlink
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PostPosted: 08-06-2006 15:25    Post subject: Most-Legged Millipede Reappears After 80 Years Reply with quote

Quote:
World's leggiest animal makes rare reappearance

Thu Jun 8, 2006 10:14 AM BST14

LONDON (Reuters) - An extremely rare species of millipede, and the one that comes closest to having 1,000 legs, has made its first appearance in 80 years.

The Illacme plenipes species had not been seen since it was first spotted in a biodiversity hotspot in California in 1926.

But Paul Marek and Professor Jason Bond of East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina recently discovered 12 of the elusive thread-like creatures that measure about 33 mm (1.3 inch) in length.

"It has the most number of legs of any animal on the planet," Marek said in an interview. "It is also an extremely rare species that has not been seen for 80 years."

The scientists found the millipedes during trips to California. Another quirky characteristic of the creatures is that they only live in a moist, wooded area measuring less than 1 sq km (0.6 sq miles) in San Benito County, California.

Marek and Bond, who were funded by the National Science Foundation, found four males, three females and five juveniles. The females had up to 666 legs, slightly fewer than the known record holder, according to the research published in the journal Nature.

The males had between 318 and 402 legs. Scientists do not know why, despite their name which means 1,000 feet, the maximum number of known appendages on a millipede is 750.

Marek said the discovery of the rare creatures highlighted the need to preserve biological diversity.

© Reuters 2006.
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PostPosted: 08-06-2006 15:27    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quick, sign him up for England! Laughing
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Timble2Offline
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PostPosted: 08-06-2006 15:33    Post subject: Reply with quote

escargot1 wrote:
Quick, sign him up for England! Laughing



No use, he'd still be putting his boots on at the end of the match....Very Happy
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PostPosted: 08-06-2006 20:48    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's TWO coats, please.
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Anonymous
PostPosted: 08-06-2006 21:04    Post subject: Reply with quote

erm....up to 666 legs.


I say no more!
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PostPosted: 09-06-2006 12:17    Post subject: Traces of Okapi Found For First Time Since 1959 Reply with quote

Quote:
Rare giraffe-like animal "rediscovered" in Congo park

Fri Jun 9, 2006 1:08 AM BST

By Ed Stoddard


JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - Delighted conservationists said on Friday that they had found conclusive proof of the existence of a rare giraffe-like creature in Congo's Virunga National Park that has defied the odds of survival in a region battered by savage conflict.

First discovered in what is now Virunga in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo in 1901, the shy forest-dwelling okapi had not been found in the park since 1959.

It was known to be present elsewhere in the Congo, but there were concerns it had gone extinct in the place of its discovery because of violence and lawlessness.

But a recent survey of the area by conservation group WWF and the Institut Congolais pour la Conservation de la Nature (ICCN) found 17 okapi tracks and other evidence of its presence.

No sightings of the elusive animal, which resembles a cross between a giraffe and a zebra with a striped behind and legs and a long neck, were made but its tracks were taken as absolute proof of the creature's recent activity in the park.

It is only found in the secluded forests of eastern Congo and is considered the giraffe's closest living relative.

"The rediscovery of okapis in Virunga National Park is a positive sign," said Marc Languy, of WWF's Eastern Africa Regional Program.

"As the country is returning to peace, it shows that the protected areas in this troubled region are now havens for rare wildlife once more," he said.

The animal's eastern Congo home has been the scene of incessant conflict including a brutal civil war that erupted in 1998 and then escalated to engulf several other African states at a cost of millions of lives.

The Congo hopes to put the bloodshed and chaos behind when it holds its first free elections in four decades next month, but marauding rebels and militia continue to fight on in the remote east.

"Except for mountain gorillas, which have shown an increase in population due to important conservation efforts, most wildlife in the park (Virunga) have heavily suffered from poaching," said WWF.

"The population of hippopotamus, for example, has dropped from 29,000 in the mid-1970s to less than 1,000 today," it said.

© Reuters 2006.
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PostPosted: 29-06-2006 10:32    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
The Times June 29, 2006


Alien giant that crept out of the woodwork
By Simon de Bruxelles





::nobreak::A GIANT beetle thought to have died out in Britain has been discovered crawling round a carpenter’s workshop.

The 16.5cm (6½in) giant capricorn beetle was at first mistaken for a toy by the man who found it, Ben Perrot.

“I thought someone had left it there to give me a fright,” he said. “It looked like something you would get from a toy shop but then it started to move.”

Mr Perrot called in colleagues who helped him to put the beetle into a glass jar.

Experts have confirmed that the beetle is a giant capricorn, which was believed to have disappeared in this country in the early 18th century. Cerambyx cerdo is still found in France and other parts of the Continent, but it is classified as extremely rare across its range.

The body of the adult, which lives for only a few weeks, measures 5cm, but its antennae stretch a further 11cm. These are used by males to detect the pheromone scent emitted by females.

The beetles make a screeching noise by rubbing their legs together to warn off predators and have large, powerful jaws capable of biting through wood. They can give a nasty nip if handled.

The giant capricorn was thought to have died out in Britain when the demand for timber meant that fallen oak trees were cut up and used rather than left to rot. The beetles spend two years as larvae burrowing through wood until they emerge to look for a mate.

Mr Perrot, from Llanelli, Carmarthenshire, spotted the beetle on a plank of wood as he was making a piece of furniture. “I’d never seen anything like it before,” he said. “It looks like something out of a science fiction film or like a monster from Doctor Who. I wasn’t too worried about it because it was a beetle, but I wouldn’t have liked it if it had been a spider.”

The creature was being studied yesterday by Ian Morgan, an entomologist, who said that it was an exciting discovery. “This is the first time in centuries that it has been seen here in Wales,” he said. “It is a male and he was found in timber labelled English oak. I realised it was something special as soon as I saw it. It is very rare and is the largest long-horned beetle in Europe.

“This type of long-horn beetle was supposed to have been extinct in the

UK since 1700. The beetle depends on very large oaks for its grubs to feed on over a long period. It is illegal to kill it anywhere.”

Workers at the furniture factory have set up a tank for the beetle to live in and plan to donate its body to the National Museum of Wales when it dies.

The wood from which the beetle emerged was a piece of English oak that had been supplied by Barrett timber merchants in Carmarthen.

Tony Giles, manager of the furniture workshop, said: “It tried to run off across the table but we popped him in a jar. We didn’t have a clue what it was at first so we looked him up on the internet and called in an expert.

“We found more than one so some breeding seems to have taken place. The origin of the wood is difficult to pinpoint because recycled oak gets mixed with fresh stuff.

“The experts say that these beetles have not been around for a long time, but it’s hard for a layman to understand how they can know that. Who can say what is crawling around out there?”

Maxwell Barclay, curator of beetles at the Natural History Museum in London, believes that the beetle — or its parents — originally hitched a ride on imported timber.

There has been no conclusive evidence of the presence of the capricorn beetle living in wood in Britain more recently than the Bronze Age.

He said: “It’s an extremely exciting find. The fact that it is a fully grown beetle means that will have lived most of its entire life in the UK, although it is doubtful that it is a native species.

“It was probably imported in with a batch of Hungarian oak and moved to the native oak in the timber yard. The fact that it was found alive at such a mature stage of it’s growth may be an indicator of climatic change. Its presence raises the exciting prospect of it becoming a native beetle once more.”

CREEPIEST CRAWLIES

A giant capricorn was found in Warwickshire last year but is thought to have come in on imported timber

Britain’s largest beetle is the stag at 7.5cm

There are 350,000 known species of beetle, 20 per cent of all animals


http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-2247986,00.html
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PostPosted: 29-06-2006 11:05    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
'Extinct' quail sighted in India

A quail believed to have been extinct for nearly 80 years has been seen by a prominent ornithologist in the north-eastern Indian state of Assam.


The Manipur Bush-Quail was seen earlier this month by Anwaruddin Choudhury, a wildlife specialist.

Bird experts say that Mr Choudhury is highly respected and that they believe he saw the quail even though he was unable to photograph it.

Experts say the sighting is one of the most exciting in India in recent years.

"This creature has almost literally returned from the dead," the Wildlife Trust of India's conservation director, Rahul Kaul, told the BBC.

"Although there was always a chance that such a bird could be seen again because of the large expanse of territory it could inhabit in the north-east of India, it's still a very exciting development.

"Now I hope other 'extinct birds' may re-appear, such as the Himalayan Quail - thought to be extinct for 125 years - and the Pink Headed Duck which also had not been seen for a long time," Dr Kaul said.

The grey-and-black streaked quail was spotted by Mr Choudhury in Assam's Manas national park.

It used to reside extensively in eastern India and what is now Bangladesh.

Correspondents say it was last seen in 1932 in what is now the north-east Indian state of Manipur.

"I'm thrilled to be part of history by sighting this shy little bird after 74 years. It's a rare privilege," Mr Choudhury told the AFP news agency.

"The bird appeared like a flash in front of our jeep and after some time it slowly moved inside the thick undergrowth.

"I knew the moment I saw the bird it was the Manipur Bush-Quail. I've been on the lookout for this species for a very long time."

The 25cm (10-inch) bird was formally identified in Manipur by British civil servant Allan Octavian Hume in 1880 when Britain ruled India.

The bird bred in grassland areas, and was usually seen in small groups of four to 12.

Story from BBC NEWS:

Published: 2006/06/28 14:29:53 GMT

© BBC MMVI
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PostPosted: 27-09-2006 12:58    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Ancient sea creature rediscovered after 25 years


Paleontologist Dr. Michael Caldwell was surprised to find the fossil of a new species of marine reptile beneath a ping-pong table.
University of Alberta scientists have named a new species of ancient marine reptile, fondly called the Ping Pong Ichthyosaur after the spot the prehistoric creature called home for the last 25 years.

Embryos found within the body of a pregnant fossil also mark the most recent record of a live birth and the physically smallest known ichthyosaur embryos.

"It was pretty amazing to realize this valuable discovery had sat under a ping-pong table for 25 years," said Dr. Michael Caldwell, paleontologist at the U of A. "But I suppose that after 100 millions of years in the dirt, it's all relative."

A few decades ago, graduate students and a technician from the Faculty of Science collected several ichthyosaur specimens - the marine animals resembled dolphins and fish - from the Loon River Formation at Hay River, NWT. Somehow the bones ended up in several boxes underneath a ping-pong table in the science undergraduate lab. When Caldwell arrived in 2000, he started renovations, found the boxes and immediately started inquiring about the fossils. Allan Lindoe, the technician of the original dig, was still in the faculty and explained the history.

Working with Erin Maxwell, an undergraduate student at the U of A at the time, Caldwell soon learned the bones were from the Lower Cretaceous period, or about 100 million years old. This finding was significant since it bridged a huge gap - the previous set of pregnant ichthyosaur specimens was dated 80 millions earlier. The Loon Lake collection was also the most northern record of ichthyosaur remains from Canada.

"What was really interesting was that, at this point in history, the ichthyosaur goes extinct," said Caldwell. "So anything from this time is going to be really important. When we opened it up, we found material in three-dimensions and very finely preserved. Then, it turned out that one was pregnant with two embryos. It was amazing."

"What it shows is that the Canadian version of extinction of the ichthyosaur has more diversity that anyone thought. Even in their declining years there were a lot more species that we thought."

Over the course of ichthyosaur evolution, the limbs were modified as paddles while the pelvis and hind limbs were reduced in size. These changes over time make it improbable that these aquatic animals could have crawled out onto land to lay eggs. The finding of these pregnant ichthyosaur fossils makes it "very clear they gave live birth and didn't lay eggs," said Caldwell.

Ichthyosaurs, like most reptiles, continuously replaced their teeth throughout their lives. So while pregnant, most female ichthyosaurs were also completely toothless, giving up the calcium for their own teeth and bones to their developing embryo. "Considering an ichthyosaur could be carrying 12 embryos at one time, that is a lot of calcium needed," said Caldwell.

The Loon River Formation material is distinctive enough to warrant the erection of a new genus and species of ichthyosaur. Caldwell and Maxwell, who is now completing her PhD in palaeontology at McGill University, named it Maiaspondylus lindoei, after the technician who helped discover it.

The research is published in the current issue of the journal Palaeontology.

Source: University of Alberta


http://www.physorg.com/printnews.php?newsid=78499384
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 18-10-2006 14:43    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Photo in the News: Extinct Dwarf Buffalo Discovered


http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/10/images/061017-dwarf-buffalo_big.jpg

October 17, 2006—An extinct species of pygmy water buffalo that once lived in the Philippines has been discovered—thanks to people's need to do household chores.

Filipino mining engineer Michael Armas found an unusual set of fossils about 40 years ago as he was excavating a hillside on the island of Cebu (Philippines map) looking for phosphate, a naturally occurring compound used in detergents and fertilizers. He took the fossils home with him, where they sat in a jar for several years.

Eventually the bones were delivered to the Field Museum in Chicago, Illinois. People often bring bones to the museum hoping they've made a rare find, museum curator Lawrence Heaney told the Cleveland Plain Dealer.

"Most of the time it's pork chops from somebody's dinner, that sort of thing," Heaney said. But this time the delivery bore fruit.

The bones, the scientists found, belonged to a species of water buffalo that probably lived between 10,000 and 100,000 years ago. The tiny bovine, seen in color in this artist's conception, stood up to 2.5 feet (0.7 meter) tall and weighed about 350 pounds (160 kilograms).

The extinct creatures were similar to a modern species of small water buffalo that lives on the nearby Philippines island of Mindoro. That animal—the middle outline in the drawing—reaches about 3 feet (0.9 meter) tall. It is related to the Asian water buffalo—the topmost outline—an even larger modern species that stands about 6 feet (1.8 meters) tall and can weigh up to a ton.

"Finding this new species is a great event in the Philippines," Angel Bautista, of the National Museum of the Philippines, said in a press release. "Only a few fossils of elephants, rhinos, pig, and deer have been found here previously. We have wonderful living biodiversity, but we have known very little about our extinct species from long ago."

And the find carries special significance, the Field Museum's experts suggest, because it could offer insight into a phenomenon called island dwarfing, a process in which large species confined to isolated islands tend to grow smaller due to fewer resources.

Island dwarfing is one of the competing explanations for the famous "hobbit" human fossils found in 2003 on the Philippines island of Flores. The fossils represent a distinct species of human that stood only 3.3 feet (1 meter) tall and lived at the same time as modern humans, some 13,000 years ago, the hobbits' discoverers say.

—Victoria Gilman


http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/10/061017-dwarf-buffalo.html
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PostPosted: 19-10-2006 15:42    Post subject: Reply with quote

That is a mighty small cow.

Do you think it will fit in my rabbit hutch?
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