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The Shipwrecks and Treasure Thread
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MonstrosaOffline
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PostPosted: 26-02-2013 20:45    Post subject: Reply with quote

USCG hearings into HMS Bounty sinking.
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FelixAntoniusOffline
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PostPosted: 26-02-2013 21:07    Post subject: Reply with quote

Much thanks for this Monstrosa, a most interesting & thought provoking report.
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rynner2Online
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PostPosted: 26-02-2013 21:42    Post subject: Reply with quote

I posted about this sinking on the Weird Weather thread.

But it turned out there was also a Fortean element involved - the woman who drowned was a descendent of Fletcher Christian...

Story starts here:
http://www.forteantimes.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=1271971#1271971
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PostPosted: 28-02-2013 21:13    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can just hear that Jamaican accent in the quotes, man.

Quote:
Teen finds buried treasure in Kingston

KINGSTON, Jamaica, Feb. 28 (UPI) -- A Jamaican teenager said he uncovered buried treasure dating back to the 1860s while working to clear a vacant lot in Kingston.

Michael Taylor, 19, was using a sledge hammer to demolish a concrete column in the lot Wednesday discover what appeared to be a vault, he told The Gleaner, Kingston, Jamaica.

Taylor called over fellow workers who helped him open the vault. Inside it, they found a vial containing silver coins, a medallion and a parchment paper.

"We tried to take up the paper but it just crumble. We saw seven coins and the pendant and we say this is really something major," Taylor said.

The coins date back to as early as 1860 and as late as 1902, the newspaper said. The medallion features a man holding a Bible and the words "Ignace de Loyola/AD Majorem dei Gloriam."

"It is amazing to know that we find something like this, 'cause none of us never born yet when whoever bury this treasure. Is like part of history. Is like it telling us something of what happened in the past," Taylor said.

Read more: http://www.upi.com/Odd_News/2013/02/28/Teen-finds-buried-treasure-in-Kingston/UPI-96921362069795/#ixzz2MEMV67tB
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rynner2Online
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PostPosted: 15-03-2013 09:43    Post subject: Reply with quote

Falmouth based deep ocean explorers set for expansion
9:00am Friday 15th March 2013 in Falmouth/Penryn

Odyssey Marine Exploration, a pioneer in the fields of deep-ocean shipwreck and offshore mineral exploration, is funding further exploration and recovery activity.
The company has sold 15 per cent of Oceanica Resources, S de R L, a newly-organised subsidiary engaged in seafloor mineral exploration, for $15 million to Mako Resources, LLC, an independent investment group.

Odyssey who use Falmouth as a base port for their ship Odyssey Explorer, is planning to continue the silver bullion recoveries from the Gairsoppa and Mantola, which are scheduled to resume in May of this year. The company recently executed a charter agreement to again secure the specialist offshore vessel Seabed Worker as the proven operating platform for these recoveries.

Silver bullion weighing 17,000 ounces was landed at the docks from the Seabed Worker last summer along with other artefacts removed from the Gairsoppa. Torpedoed in 1941, Gairsoppa lies three miles down on the seabed of the Atlantic some 300 miles south west of Ireland.

During last year’s salvage operations at the Gairsoppa wreck-site, a total of 1,218 silver ingots were recovered. They are expected to yield approximately $44 million at current silver prices.

Mantola was located approximately 100 miles from the Gairsoppa in a depth of 2,500 metres. Outward bound from London to Calcutta with general cargo and shipment of silver she was torpedoed by a U-boat on February 8 1917. Based on 1917 silver values Odyssey has calculated that this would equate to 600,000 ounces of silver.

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/fpfalmouth/10285836.Falmouth_based_deep_ocean_explorers_set_for_expansion/
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rynner2Online
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PostPosted: 13-04-2013 18:51    Post subject: Reply with quote

Isles of Scilly shipwreck site could be lost ship of Sir Walter Raleigh
Saturday, April 13, 2013 Western Morning News
By Toby Meyjes

A shipwreck uncovered off the Isles of Scilly last summer could have belonged to Sir Walter Raleigh and been lost when a storm scattered his vessels as they headed for the West Indies.
The wreck, which has been named the Lizzy by the divers who discovered it, is thought to have possibly sunk in 1617 and been one of two ships lost out of a fleet of 30 shortly after they left Plymouth.

The exciting possibility is one of two theories of the wreck's identity put forward by local shipwreck diver Todd Stevens who, along with Robin Burrows and their team, have slowly uncovered the remains since last summer.

If correct, the ship could have been the Flying Joan, one of the fleet on one of the last voyages led by Sir Walter Raleigh before he was executed at the Palace of Westminster in 1618.

Mr Stevens, 50, who also discovered the famous wreck of the HMS Colossus off the Isles of Scilly, labelled the idea of the discovery "amazing".
He is now awaiting a visit from English Heritage to hopefully help further identify the wreck site.
He said: "Since we first found the Lizzy, I have always said that the evidence we have on the seabed leads me to believe it to be the wreck of an armed pinnace.
"This would be a small, single-masted ship without a bowsprit and consequently a gun in the bow instead.
"The ship Sir Walter Raleigh lost here in a storm in 1617 was indeed an armed pinnace. The wreck fits in age and style."

The process of discovering the Lizzy, named for its guns dating to the late Tudor period, began in 2008 when Mr Stevens and his team conducted a magnetometer survey around the islands to detect anomalies, which they would later attempt to identify over the following years.

In the meantime, Mr Burrows had developed a side-scan sonar which in 2012 identified two 5ft-6ft objects laying in the middle of the St Mary's Roads. The items, which were in 14-metre-deep water, were later discovered to be guns and, along with other characteristics of the wreck, have pointed towards it possibly being the Flying Joan or, less likely, a privateer vessel lost in the Civil War.

"It's amazing that people don't know what's underneath them," added Mr Stevens. "It would have to be quite an old ship to have been involved in the Civil War, the guns would have had to have been about 60 years old, but at the time they would have been desperate for ships."
The wreck is a relatively small ship made of oak, about 40ft-50ft long and 15ft wide.

Mr Stevens explained there was much debris scattered on the seabed around it, but unfortunately very little can be linked definitively to the wreck. To the left of the site the team discovered a swivel gun and a red clay pipe dating to 1630 or earlier. Numerous English, French and Spanish pottery fragments were found, all dating to the Tudor period.

Also discovered was a bronze pulley sheave, similar to that on the famous Mary Rose wreck and a bigger version on later wreck sites, and a complete bung hole from the late-15th century.

The wreck is the seventh to be found in and around St Mary's in recent years and although some evidence points towards it being the wreck of the Flying Joan, Mr Stevens is keen to stress it is only a possibility. As he said, it is a "mystery waiting to be solved".

Read more: http://www.thisiscornwall.co.uk/Isles-Scilly-shipwreck-site-lost-ship-Sir-Walter/story-18694840-detail/story.html#ixzz2QN2UlJ5k
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rynner2Online
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PostPosted: 10-05-2013 20:54    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shipwrecked gutta percha blocks wash up in South West

About 40 large blocks of a rubber-like substance, believed to be from a shipwreck in the Atlantic Ocean, have washed up on European coasts.
The pieces of gutta percha have been found on beaches in Cornwall, Devon, northern France and the Netherlands in the last year.

The Porthcurno Telegraph Museum in Cornwall said the blocks bore the name of a 19th Century plantation.
The material was used to insulate telegraph cables on the seabed.
Marc Cragg from the museum said: "Gutta percha is from Indonesia and is very similar to rubber.
"It has been a central part of telegraph systems for the last 100 years or so."

His colleague Rachel Webster said: "Many of the cables which were insulated with it remain in situ on the seabed."


Mr Cragg said: "It looks like there was a shipwreck 80 miles (130km) or so off the coast of Brittany in the Western Approaches."

He added that the gutta percha, which would have been stored as cargo, could have been released during a salvage operation.
"If you look at the distribution, it would make sense," Mr Cragg said.

The museum said the blocks, which were about 12in (30cm) by 14in (35cm) had the letters "TJIPETIR", which was believed to be the name of a rubber plantation in the Dutch East Indies in the 19th Century.
In recent months staff have been working to find out how many blocks have washed-up.

It added that gutta percha was used to make golf balls, teddy bear noses and decorative items such as picture frames and jewellery.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-22478533
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rynner2Online
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PostPosted: 17-05-2013 08:27    Post subject: Reply with quote

Deep sea treasure hunters return to Falmouth after silver bullion mission5:00pm Thursday 16th May 2013 in News .

Wreck hunters are back in town ready to salvage silver bullion from the depths of the Atlantic. Odyssey Marine’s research vessel Odyssey Explorer docked here yesterday after operating near the Isles of Scilly as the company continues searching and examining wrecks.

Odyssey has confirmed that next week the specialist salvage ship Seabed Worker will resume the salvage of silver bullion from the steamship Gairsoppa. Torpedoed in 1941, the ship lies three miles down on the seabed of the Atlantic some 300 miles south west of Ireland.

Odyssey Marine’s CEO Gregg Stemm said in 2012: “Our team has proven their ability to efficiently execute complex operations at a depth of 4,700 metres (15,600 feet) to complete both the deepest cargo salvage and largest recovery of precious metals ever accomplished. We’ve proven that we can make precise cuts, gain access to interior areas of a steel shipwreck, and recover cargo from a shipwreck deeper than the Titanic.”

To date, 1,218 Gairsoppa silver bars have been recovered and sold. An additional £300,000 was realised from the sale of gold that was extracted from the silver smelting process. The total proceeds from the deep-ocean project are more than £27 million.

Silver bullion weighing 17,000 ounces was landed at Falmouth Docks last year by Seabed Worker along with other artefacts removed from the steamship Gairsoppa.

Odyssey said: “The Seabed Worker is expected to depart port and resume silver recovery operations at the Gairsoppa site. Research indicates an additional 1,599 insured silver ingots remain on the site, which could equate to about 1.8 million ounces of silver, along with the potential for additional uninsured silver.

“Upon completion of the recovery operations, we will begin recovery operations on the SS Mantola which was carrying 600,000 ounces of silver. We recently obtained research indicating the likely location of the room where bullion would have been stored on that ship.”

The SS Mantola, a 450-foot British cargo vessel, set sail from London in February 1917, carrying passengers and cargo – including a shipment of silver – to Calcutta, India. On February 8, 1917, she was struck by a torpedo from the German U-boat commanded by Kapitanleutnant Raimund Weisbach. The 165 crew members and 18 passengers abandoned the ship.
All but seven crew members, who drowned when a lifeboat overturned, were rescued by the HMS Laburnum.

Weisbach was the watch officer on U20, under Kapitanleutenant Schwieger’s command, who fired the torpedo that sank the liner Lusitania in 1915.

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/10424254.Deep_sea_treasure_hunters_return_to_Falmouth_after_silver_bullion_mission__PICTURE/?ref=mr
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rynner2Online
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PostPosted: 30-05-2013 07:17    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Mary Rose: A Tudor ship's secrets revealed
By Eleanor Williams, BBC News

More than 30 years after it was raised from the seabed - and almost 500 years since it sank - the secrets of Henry VIII's flagship, the Mary Rose, are being revealed to the public - along with the faces of its crew.
Just yards from where it was first constructed from 600 oak trees near Portsmouth's naval docks in 1510, the wreck of the Tudor warship now stands on view in its new £35m home.

Where once stood a proud, cutting-edge ship built for war, now lies a reconstructed array of wooden decks and pillars, withered by their hundreds of years at the bottom of the Solent.
Standing nearby are some of the men who shared a grave with the ship for hundreds of years, their faces now reconstructed and displayed for the first time.

Viewed through windows on three separate floors, the preserved wreck stands opposite some of its 19,000 artefacts recovered from the depths.

Within the exhibition the recreated decks, dimly lit interiors and groaning sounds of the sea outside all combine to give the sense of being on board the 16th Century vessel.
The crew's quarters are all visible, while rows of cannons line the main deck, pointing out of the open gunports ready to be fired at enemy ships.

It is a Tudor time capsule - dubbed "Britain's Pompeii" by historian David Starkey - and its custodians cannot wait to show it off.

"What we're aiming to achieve here is a mirror image of the ship and to show artefacts where they belonged," explains Nick Butterley, exhibition co-ordinator.
"So many things in this gallery you can immediately look at and understand what they are. That's one of the real beauties of the collection, how realistic and normal it feels."

Every artefact on show here is an original piece found with the wreck. Some of the cannons were still sticking out of the gunports when it was discovered in 1971.

The Mary Rose was raised from the seabed of the Solent in 1982, and has been on display before, but it is only now that insights into life on board are being shown to the public.

Forensic scientists, more used to working with murder victims, have recreated the faces of seven of the about 500 men who died when the ship sank in 1545.
The new Mary Rose Museum has been dedicated to them, and it is through them the story of the ship is now being told.

Curators had no list of crew names, just numbers. Only the names of the vice admiral, Sir George Carew, and the master, Roger Grenville, are known.

Maritime archaeologist Alex Hildred was part of the team who excavated and raised the wreck and has since studied the human remains to discover more about the men and boys - whose ages range from 12 to 40 - found on board.
"You've got a really good glimpse of Tudor males at a moment in time," she says. "It's a healthy, living population, you are not looking at a churchyard.
"They were pretty well fed once they were on the ship - we know that from the diet. But there had been severe famines in the 1520s, so some of their bones have got evidence of vitamin deficiency, such as rickets or sometimes scurvy from the fact that they suffered as children.
"They've also got a lot of healed fractures - which is what you'd expect on a warship - a number of broken noses, one arrow wound and some arthritis. These guys were used to lifting heavy things."

The human remains found are displayed in galleries at the bow and stern of the ship, along with thousands of artefacts.
"This is where we personalise the collection, trying to show that these objects belonged to real people who lived and sadly died on the ship," explains maritime archaeologist Christopher Dobbs, giving the BBC a guided tour.

Forensic artist Oscar Nilsson explains to Robert Hall how he created a model of one of the sailors who drowned on the Mary Rose
"One thing that's so powerful about the Mary Rose collection is that we found a number of chests in the ship and they tell us about an individual person, because they contain the objects that belonged to a person."

He says the master carpenter's chest, for example, contained three plates, a tankard, a sundial, a book and even a backgammon set - indicating "quite a wealthy person".
"We also, just outside the carpenter's cabin, found the skeleton of a dog," he adds.
"It's these tiny insights that we've got into Tudor life, as well as the obvious things like guns and rigging, that really make our display so exceptional."

When the Mary Rose was built, it was part of a new generation of modern carvel-built ships - planks laid side to side - which featured gunports with lids, allowing heavier guns to be carried.
The warship fought its first battle in 1512 against France after King Henry VIII joined Pope Julius II's Holy League against the French the previous year. It fought many more over the next 34 years.

But Mary Rose's life as a serving Navy ship came to an abrupt end on 19 July 1545, when it sank during the Battle of the Solent while, once again, leading the attack on the French invasion fleet.

Francis I was attempting an invasion of England with 30,000 soldiers and more than 220 ships - much larger than the more well-known Spanish Armada 43 years later.
The English had about 60 ships and 12,000 soldiers, but managed to fight off the French who eventually retreated the day after the Mary Rose sank.

Only 35 men survived disaster, according to contemporary records. Many would have been trapped under the anti-boarding netting and drowned.
Legend has it that Henry VIII watched in horror from Southsea castle along with the wife of Vice Admiral Sir George Carew.
As the ship sank, the cries and screams from the drowning men and boys could be heard back on land. The loss of the ship is said to have affected the king deeply.

Accounts on what happened that day differ, but one survivor claimed the ship had just fired its guns on one side and was turning to fire from the other when the wind caught its sails and plunged the open gunports below the water, which sank it.
French historians claim its forces were responsible for sinking the Mary Rose in battle.

For the next 300 years the Mary Rose - like a snapshot of Tudor military life - lay undisturbed on the seabed.
Even though many items from the wreck were raised by early pioneering divers John and Charles Deane in 1836, the site was then lost again for another 100 years
.

It was finally located again in 1971 and, since then, divers have made 27,000 dives to the wreck site outside the entrance to Portsmouth Harbour.
One chest got archaeologists particularly excited when they discovered it had a secret compartment. Mr Dobbs says they thought it may contain something valuable the wealthy owner was trying to hide.
"It was like a time capsule within a time capsule, within a time capsule," explains Mr Dobbs. "But it only had a pin in it."
"Maybe this once was used to hold together some important papers that have not survived. We will never know."

But there are many more secrets the team is still hoping to reveal and the new museum is being heralded as a new beginning for the Mary Rose story.
Many of the items found have still not been identified, but as artefacts go on display the curators hope they are identified by experts in various fields who share their knowledge.
"We had the bishop of Portsmouth here last week and he saw this book cover and pointed out it was probably the ship's bible cover," Mr Dobbs adds.
"We are learning more as we go along."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-22639505

Much, much more on page.

I watched the raising of the Mary Rose live on TV. A few years later I was in Portsmouth after a yacht delivery, and saw the early stages of the restoration project. I'd love to see this new exhibition.
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PostPosted: 30-05-2013 07:32    Post subject: Reply with quote

Somewhere in my attic I have the Observer's Mary Rose commemorative edition. Will have to dig it out! Very Happy
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rynner2Online
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PostPosted: 30-05-2013 08:51    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another report (with video and pics)

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/destinations/europe/uk/10071199/Inside-the-new-Mary-Rose-museum.html

Quote:
Wildfire. That’s what would have blazed onto enemy decks from the masts of the Mary Rose, the great warship commissioned by King Henry VIII when he came to the throne. It was flung, or possibly shot, using ‘fire arrows’: spears wrapped with a collar of gunpowder and oil that would fuse, burn and explode. We know this because they have one – or three, actually – on display on one of the ‘decks’ of the new £27 million Mary Rose Museum in Portsmouth.
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PostPosted: 04-07-2013 21:49    Post subject: Reply with quote

There was an article in The Herald today about a boat discovered yesterday off the coast of Scotland riddled with bullet holes and with nobody aboard, and no sign of what had happened to the crew. They called it a modern day Mary Celeste. Can I find anything at all about this online? Nope. Seems it's disappeared altogether.
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rynner2Online
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PostPosted: 04-07-2013 21:53    Post subject: Reply with quote

gncxx wrote:
There was an article in The Herald today about a boat discovered yesterday off the coast of Scotland riddled with bullet holes and with nobody aboard, and no sign of what had happened to the crew. They called it a modern day Mary Celeste. Can I find anything at all about this online? Nope. Seems it's disappeared altogether.

Was it still afloat? What size boat? Which coast of Scotland?
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PostPosted: 04-07-2013 22:02    Post subject: Reply with quote

OK, just checked the paper, and it was a dinghy found between Muck and Ardnamurchan by the Tobermory RNLI. They seemed to think it had floated all the way from America (!).
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PostPosted: 04-07-2013 22:22    Post subject: Reply with quote

gncxx wrote:
OK, just checked the paper, and it was a dinghy found between Muck and Ardnamurchan by the Tobermory RNLI. They seemed to think it had floated all the way from America (!).

Well, I've sailed through there many times, but that was at least 4 decades ago, so I've nothing to add!
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