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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 28-03-2013 23:23    Post subject: Reply with quote

Devon tenant Brian Kiddell sells landlord's home online for £90,000

A tenant who sold his landlord's property on the internet for £90,000, has been jailed.
Brian Kiddell, 75, of Topsham Road, Exeter, posed as the owner of the Newton Abbot property.
The owner of the Devon house only found out when he drove past the For Sale sign after the deal had been completed.

At Exeter Crown Court Kiddell admitted nine charges of fraud, theft, and the dishonest use of a dead man's passport. He was jailed for six years.
The court heard that Kiddell rented the house in Prince Rupert Way, Heathfield, Newton Abbot in the name of Paul Stevenson, who had died in 2004, but whose passport he had obtained.

He posed as owner David Ayton, to put the house up for sale.

Mr Gareth Evans, prosecuting, said: "Kiddell had been renting the house for four months when the owner happened, purely by chance, to be driving past and noticed there was a For Sale sign outside the address.
"He contacted his own letting agent and the estate agent and found that it was being sold."
By the time he raised the alarm, Kiddell had completed the sale and made off with the money. Shocked

The court also heard that Kiddell tried to access a bank account under a false name to transfer £18,000 after saying the account holder had died and presenting a fake death certificate.
He claimed to be the dead man's brother but the bank blocked the transfer when the real customer was found alive.

Kiddell carried out several other frauds but was caught after applying for a £25,000 loan in the name of Anthony Russell at Barclay's Bank in Launceston, Cornwall.
When Kiddell, posing as Mr Russell, turned up for an appointment he was arrested by plain clothes police.

Mr Stephen Mejzner, defending, said Kiddell was forced to take part in the frauds by an organised crime gang to whom he owed money.
He was sentenced on Wednesday.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-21964552

There's material here for a TV drama and/or documentary!
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 23-04-2013 13:46    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner2 wrote:
The brass neck of some people is amazing!

Fake bomb detectors sold by businessman, court told

A businessman sold fake bomb detectors to Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Georgia and Niger, the Old Bailey has been told.

James McCormick guilty of selling fake bomb detectors

Millionaire businessman James McCormick, 56, has been convicted at the Old Bailey of three counts of fraud after selling fake bomb detectors.
The Advanced Detection Equipment was based on a golf ball finder device and sold for up to $40,000 (£27,000) in Iraq, Georgia, Saudi Arabia and Niger.
McCormick, of Langport, Somerset, said to have made £50m from sales of the devices, will be sentenced next month.

An Iraqi bomb victim described him as a "morally bankrupt" man.

The models were described by prosecutors as completely ineffectual and lacking any grounding in science.
Police say McCormick showed a complete disregard for the safety of those that used and relied upon the device for their own security and protection

There is no evidence that he tried to sell to the Ministry of Defence, but an Essex policeman organised a demonstration which was watched by an MoD inspector.

McCormick claimed that the detectors could bypass "all forms of concealment".
However Richard Whittam QC, who was prosecuting, said "the devices did not work and he knew they did not work."

Iraq spent more than $40m on 6000 devices between 2008 and 2010.

Haneen Alwan needed 59 operations after she was injured in a bomb blast in January 2009. She was two months pregnant at the time and lost her child.

"When people passed through checkpoints using these devices, they thought they would be safe, but they are useless. The man who sold them has no conscience. He is morally bankrupt. How could he sell them just for money and destroy other people's lives?"
"The devices were used at numerous checkpoints within Iraq during this period. It is clear that both civilians and armed forces personnel were put at significant risk in relying upon this equipment," said Det Insp Ed Heath of the Avon and Somerset Constabulary, the deputy senior investigating officer

"McCormick showed a complete disregard for the safety of those that used and relied upon the device for their own security and protection. He amassed many millions of pounds through his greed and criminal enterprise."

McCormick was remanded on conditional bail and will be sentenced on 2 May.

Watch Newsnight's full report on the fake bomb detector story and the programme's investigation into it at 22:30 BST on BBC Two on Tuesday 23 April 2013.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-22266051
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gncxxOffline
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PostPosted: 23-04-2013 16:38    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is there any such thing as an authentic bomb detector? Or was all this pie in the sky from the start?
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OneWingedBirdOffline
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PostPosted: 23-04-2013 18:02    Post subject: Reply with quote

It does sound a bit suspicious, doesn't it? Esp. when used by people who would have live ammo and perhaps grenades on their persons.
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MythopoeikaOffline
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PostPosted: 23-04-2013 19:13    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've heard of some real technology that can 'sniff' certain types of explosives, but I don't know if any of these devices have been perfected or even deployed.
Generally, it has so far been simpler to train dogs to sniff out explosives. Thinking about it, they probably wouldn't use dogs in Muslim countries because of the 'unclean animal' thing.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 23-04-2013 19:34    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mythopoeika wrote:
I've heard of some real technology that can 'sniff' certain types of explosives, but I don't know if any of these devices have been perfected or even deployed.
Generally, it has so far been simpler to train dogs to sniff out explosives.

Just recently on another thread I posted:
Quote:
Machines for analysing gases have been around in industry for years. Over 40 years ago I was working as a geological technician on oil drilling rigs. A small tube collected the gases given off by the drilling mud and brought them across to our cabin, where they passed through a Gas Chromatograph. We were primarily looking for hydrocarbons that might indicate the drill was entering an oil-bearing layer. In fact, the GC sometimes provided the first indication of the presence of the 'black gold'.

Primitive forms of Breathalysers were around from the late 1920s, and British Police have had roadside breathalysers since 1967.

http://www.forteantimes.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=1312522#1312522

Anything volatile emits molecules into the atmosphere. If a sniffer dog can detect them, then in principle a machine could as well.

I'd be interested to know if McCormick marketed his device using such claims - they'd have sounded pretty plausible, given the similar technology actually in use.
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eburacumOffline
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PostPosted: 26-04-2013 15:52    Post subject: Reply with quote

These fake detectors are still in use in Kenya
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-22306632
Quote:

Kenya police: Bomb detectors not fake

Kenya's police say the devices have prevented grenade attacks in Nairobi

Police in Kenya have sought to reassure the public that their bomb and drug detectors work, after the conviction of a British man for selling fake devices.

They carried out a public demonstration in the capital, Nairobi, in which the detector seemingly located narcotics.

The police refused to divulge where they had purchased their devices from.

But they look identical to the ADE detectors sold by convicted fraudster James McCormick and bear the name of his company, ATSC.


The detectors come with cards which are "programmed" to find items, from ivory to bombs During his trial, McCormick told the court he had sold his devices to the Kenyan police, in addition to the authorities in Iraq, Hong Kong, Egypt and Thailand.

Asked about McCormick's conviction, Nairobi police chief Benson Githinji told reporters:

"Let me assure Nairobians, the machines in use are serviceable and don't fall short... They are in operation and they work."

He said that one of the reasons why there had not been a successful grenade attack in Nairobi recently was because of the machines.

There had been a spate of such attacks since Kenya sent troops into neighbouring Somalia in October 2011 to tackle the al-Shabab militant group.

He did not say how many of the devices had been purchased, or when they were first used, but UK police have told the BBC that 26 were sold to Kenya in May 2004.

During this week's hearing in London, the court was told McCormick's detectors, which cost up to $40,000 (£27,000) each, were completely ineffectual and lacked any grounding in science.

Richard Whittam QC, for the prosecution, said: "The devices did not work and he knew they did not work."

The court heard that the detectors came with cards which were "programmed" to detect a wide array of substances, from ivory to $100 banknotes.

In reality, McCormick's device was based on $20 (£13) golf ball finders which he had purchased from the US and which had no working electronics.
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eburacumOffline
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PostPosted: 26-04-2013 15:54    Post subject: Reply with quote

And in Bagdad
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-22266225
Quote:
Fake bomb detectors still being used in Baghdad
23 April 2013 Last updated at 17:25

A corrupt British businessman has been convicted of fraud after a jury found him guilty of a multi-million pound scam selling bogus bomb detecting equipment around the world.

Iraq spent more than $40m (£26.2m) on 6,000 of Jim McCormick's fake devices between 2008 and 2010.

Despite the authorities in the UK establishing the bomb detectors were useless in 2012, the BBC's Ben Brown discovered they were still in widespread use in Baghdad while filming there in March 2013
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 18-05-2013 00:00    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
'King of Marbella' John Disley jailed over bank fraud
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-lancashire-22570334

John Disley (left), Victoria Quinn, and Jonathan Stowell (right) were jailed over the bank scam

A conman dubbed the "King of Marbella" and his three accomplices have been jailed over a £675,000 bank fraud.

The scam allowed leader John Disley, 46, of Hertfordshire, to lead a lavish lifestyle in Spain, the court heard.

The group bought companies in trouble and used them to withdraw large sums of cash from the Royal Bank of Scotland just before cheques bounced.

From their office near Preston they electronically moved the cash to other accounts, the city's crown court heard.

'More worried about snow'
Disley, whose office was in Little Hoole, claimed he was restructuring the businesses but instead stripped them of assets and used them to set up bank accounts, obtaining cash through fraudulent cheques, the court heard.

When he was arrested he was convinced the scam would not be traced back to him and told detectives he was "more worried about it snowing".

Disley, of Old House Lane, Kings Langley, earned his Marbella nickname from expats in Spain who saw him as a multi-millionaire living a champagne lifestyle, when in reality he was bankrupt.


John Disley used cash from the scam to buy a personalised pool for his Spanish villa
His lavish lifestyle included splashing out £30,000 for a palm tree at his villa.

He was found guilty last month of conspiracy to defraud £675,937 from the Royal Bank of Scotland, as well as £214,000 from a financial services company, between May and December 2010.

Sentencing him to four-and-a-half years in prison at Preston Crown Court, Judge Heather Lloyd said: "Your arrogance was apparent when arrested.

"You did not think for one moment that the prosecution would succeed.

"You gave other people scripts to follow but the evidence against you was overwhelming and the jury saw right through you."

'Intimidating when crossed'
Jonathan Stowell, 41, of Bradshawgate, Bolton, and Stuart Hegarty, 44, of Helston Drive, Nottingham, were convicted of the same charge after the seven-week trial.

Disley's "right-hand woman" and personal assistant, Victoria Quinn, 40, from Accrington, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to defraud in October.

Stowell was sentenced to 15 months, Hegarty was jailed for 12 months and Quinn to two years.

Disley was also disqualified from being a company director for eight years, Stowell for three years and Quinn for five years.

Continue reading the main story

Start Quote

It's not right that criminals like Disley should live beyond their means”

Det Con Keith Allen
Lancashire Police
Judge Lloyd said Disley could be "intimidating when crossed" and described Quinn as a "thoroughly dishonest woman" with a string of convictions for fraud and theft.

Stowell would help Disley find the businesses to buy and exploit, while Hegarty knowingly paid in cheques from an account which had been closed for some time, the court heard.

Royal Bank of Scotland bank manager Russell Alker, 39, of Preston, Lancashire, who worked at a branch in Wigan, was alleged to be an "inside man", but was cleared by the jury of any involvement in the fraud.

Thomas Aldred, 24, of Preston, the ex-boyfriend of Disley's daughter, Laura, was also cleared.

The convictions followed a two-year investigation by the Lancashire Constabulary Financial Investigation Department, during which inquiries were carried out across the country.

Det Con Keith Allen said: "Disley believed he was above the law.

"He portrayed himself as a legitimate multi-millionaire businessman when in fact he was a bankrupt who made his living by asset-stripping companies which were in financial difficulty.

"It's not right that criminals like Disley should live beyond their means, essentially at the cost of law-abiding members of the community."

A proceeds of crime hearing is scheduled for next March.
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 20-05-2013 10:54    Post subject: Reply with quote

Full text at link.

Quote:
In Virginia's Fairfax County, Robbing Banks for the CIA
By Tom Schoenberg
http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-04-18/in-virginias-fairfax-county-robbing-banks-for-the-cia#p1

April 18, 2013 Facebook Tweet LinkedIn Google Plus Email
In a white-walled interrogation room in a small Virginia police station last June, two detectives were trying to get Herson Torres to crack. Surveillance video tied him to two attempted bank robberies in the area during the past week. The skinny 21-year-old didn’t have a criminal record and seemed nervous, but he wasn’t talking. The detectives showed him pictures of his brother and father. They told Torres he could be sent to prison for as many as 25 years.


H. Torres

“If I tell you, you’re not going to believe me,” Torres said. He was crying as he told them an incredible story about being recruited by the Defense Intelligence Agency to participate in a secret operation testing the security of Washington-area banks. He said he’d been assigned to rob a half-dozen banks over four days. And he told them about Theo, the man who hired him and gave all the orders—even though Torres had never met him.

Angry, his interrogators accused him of making up a ridiculous story. Still, Torres persuaded them to look at the text and e-mail messages on his cell phone; he also gave them the password to his Facebook (FB) account and urged them to retrieve a copy of the Defense Intelligence Agency immunity letter from his glove compartment. The police locked up Torres on a charge of attempted robbery and examined the evidence. By the end of the night, they weren’t sure what was going on, but they suspected Torres might be telling the truth.


Torres’s unlikely entry into the covert world of retail bank security testing had begun seven days earlier, he said. He had returned home from unloading trucks at Target (TGT) when his phone lit up with a text message from an old friend. “Hey, I got this job for you where you’re going to get paid 25K,” Carolina Villegas wrote. “Doing what?” Torres asked. “Robbing banks,” she texted.

STORY: Miami Heist: The Brink's Money Plane Job's Messy Aftermath
Torres started laughing. “Is this a joke?” he wondered. Soon Villegas was on the phone explaining that it was a government job. And it was legal.

The thought of making $25,000 was seductive to Torres, who was earning $11 an hour at Target. Since graduating from high school in 2008, Torres, who goes by the nickname Geo, hadn’t changed much. He spent most of his time hanging out with friends, collecting Batman comic books, and working part-time jobs. Twenty-five thousand dollars would be enough to start community college and move out of his parents’ house.

Three hours after talking to Villegas, Torres was climbing into her gray Jeep Cherokee in a Dick’s Sporting Goods parking lot in Bailey’s Crossroads, Va. He hadn’t seen her since high school, though the two had been chatting on Facebook recently. Villegas was a supply specialist in the U.S. Army Reserve and also worked as a cashier at a Carter’s baby clothing store, according to Torres, police, and the military. (Villegas declined to comment for this story.) When Torres arrived, Villegas was talking on her phone while writing down text messages. She was wearing a black glove on her right hand. Her Army fatigues and combat boots were in the back seat.

VIDEO: Fake Cops, Armed Men: The Most Famous Heists Ever
Villegas introduced Torres to the man on the phone, Theo. He didn’t offer a last name. Theo said he worked for the government and was recruiting Torres to test the defenses of Washington-area banks. The plan was simple: Theo would tell him which bank to target, and Torres would give a manager a note demanding money. Armed security officers, threats to call the police, or a wait that exceeded five minutes would be cause to flee. If he left with money, he’d be paid $25,000. Successful or not, he was guaranteed $2,500 for taking part. Torres would deliver any money recovered to a location near Richmond. If arrested, Torres should stay silent. Federal authorities would get him out in 24 hours.

“Is this real?” Torres asked. Theo was reassuring: The entire operation was government-approved. Torres was even vetted before being approached, Theo said, mentioning a misdemeanor theft charge against Torres for stealing from a J.C. Penney store when he was 15.

Torres said he was in. To his surprise, the operation started immediately. He put on the hooded sweatshirt Villegas had asked him to bring, and she drove him to a strip mall three miles away. The hoodie would hide his face and cover the ambigram-style “Breathe Music” tattoo on his forearm.

VIDEO: Was Belgium's $50M Diamond Heist an Inside Job?
Torres was sweating as he entered the SunTrust (STI) branch in Alexandria, Va. As Theo instructed, Torres wore a single black glove to avoid leaving fingerprints. Keeping his head down, he handed the manager the note: “I need your help. I need money. My family is being held hostage and a bomb will go off at 4:30 if you don’t help. Don’t call the police or the FBI.” ...

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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 21-05-2013 22:05    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
'Sugar daddy' serial conman jailed for seven years
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-tees-22617609

Price fleeced £172,533 from his victims

A conman who fleeced more than £170,000 out of women he met on a website for "sugar daddies" has been jailed.

Jonathan Price, 41, whose latest address was near Darlington, used the website to trick women and their families into giving him money.

The court heard how he posed as a super-wealthy businessman and also pretended he was dying to gain £172,533 from his victims.

He was jailed for seven years at Teesside Crown court on Tuesday.

Judge Howard Crowson said Price was "selfish" and had "preyed" on the vulnerability of victims who were seeking love and companionship.

The court heard how after convincing his victims he had millions in offshore accounts, he managed to borrow thousands from them and their parents by claiming he had cash flow problems and that he would repay them once the issues were resolved.

He would then vanish after claiming to be terminally ill with a brain tumour and move in with another woman, who he had already been developing as a potential victim.

Price claimed to have a white Rolls Royce, to have been a Paratrooper and even in the SAS, the court heard.

Peter Sabiston, defending, previously told the court: "He is unsure because of the lies he has told, what is true and what is fantasy. He does seem to lead a life of fantasy."

'A safe bet'
He fleeced £24,000 from the parents of a woman in her 30s from Bournemouth for life-prolonging cancer treatments he pretended he needed, before bankrupting a 38-year-old woman in London after spending about £20,000 on her credit card.

While he was with her, Price had started to target a chemist from County Durham to whom he proposed to after chatting to her online.

The pair got married but later divorced after Price defrauded her out of £72,000 and her parents out of a further £7,000.

She had his baby last year.

The court heard how Price would produce false bank statements to convince the women and their families he had a fortune abroad.

He also tricked a businessman into becoming his personal financial manager, and fooled estate agents and a boat dealer.

Mr Sabiston told the court Price realised he may never see his child again, and accepts he has "damaged some people very badly and caused a lot of hardship to people he was very close to".
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 21-05-2013 22:17    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Four men jailed over 'Red Hand Defenders' blackmail plot
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-22609775

Belfast Crown Court was told the gang were under police surveillance when they collected the cash

Four men have been jailed over a blackmail plot in which a couple were threatened with paramilitary attack if they did not hand over £15,000 in cash.

Bullets were posted to them, claiming to be from "the Red Hand Defenders".

The gang, which included a convicted killer, typed their demands on a toy typewriter, Belfast Crown Court heard.

Gary Fulton, Philip Blaney, and Mark Briggs were jailed for five years, while Daniel Hamilton was jailed for two years and eight months.

Fulton, Blaney, and Briggs had pleaded guilty to two counts of blackmail while Hamilton admitted aiding and abetting blackmail.

The court heard that the unnamed couple - known only as Witnesses A and B - had been targeted by two hand-delivered letters containing bullets at their home and business addresses on dates between 21 February and 24 March 2011.

The letters demanded that they pay £15,000 or face "action with extreme prejudice by the Red Hand Defenders".

'Barbie typewriter'
The court heard that Fulton, from Gillespie Court in Comber, County Down, and Briggs and Blaney - who are neighbours from Westland Road, Portadown - used Hamilton as a "conduit" to target the couple.

Hamilton from the Old Mill Manor, Laurelvale, knew the couple and pleaded guilty at an early stage.

Outlining the case, a prosecution lawyer said that Witness A agreed to pay the gang after receiving a number of further demands threatening that his house and business would be attacked.

However, he had also sought the help of police.

During a subsequent police raid on Blaney's home, a Barbie electric typewriter was discovered, which the police strongly believed was used to type out the gangs' demands.

The prosecution lawyer described how the first set of threats were followed up by a petrol canister being placed in a lorry owned by Witness A.

PSNI surveillance
During a mobile phone call the following day, Witness A was asked how he liked his "present" and was warned that the next petrol canister would be "ignited".

A meeting between Witness A and Hamilton was then arranged, under police guidance.

Under PSNI surveillance, the pair met at Rushmere Shopping Centre in Craigavon, County Armagh, where Hamilton was handed a bag containing £5,000.

Surveillance officers watched Hamilton driving off and travelling to Blaney's home on Westland Road, Portadown.

Hamilton and Blaney were then observed walking from the house to a car, where they handed articles to Briggs. Shortly afterwards, Fulton emerged from a nearby vehicle and the gang then went back towards Blaney's house while Hamilton waited outside.

Uniformed police then swooped on the gang.

Chased
Blaney ran from the scene and tried to dump a backpack containing the money on a nearby rooftop.

However, he was chased by officers and all four men were subsequently arrested.

The court heard that the gang had targeted the couple for blackmail because, aside from their legitimate business interests, they had cultivated a substantial cannabis farm.

Witness A and B have subsequently been convicted over the drugs offence, the court was told.

In mitigation, the court heard Hamilton had pleaded guilty at the earliest opportunity and beyond this incident was not believed to be involved in criminality.

The judge was told Briggs had turned to drugs after the early deaths of his parents and later break-up with his long-term partner while Fulton came from a "respectable family background" and now expressed his "regret" at becoming involved in the plot.

Blast bomb
Blaney's defence lawyer said although his client had a criminal record he was now "seriously considering his lifestyle choices".

Blaney had previously served a jail sentence for the manslaughter of a Portadown grandmother who was killed in a loyalist blast bomb attack in 1999.

The police have welcome the blackmail convictions and sentences.

Det Supt Philip Marshall, from the PSNI's Organised Crime Branch, said it was the culmination of a complex investigation.

"I would like to pay tribute to the investigators involved and to the continued support from the victims in this matter."

He said blackmail can be a difficult crime to combat but that police have systems in place to ensure that those responsible are apprehended.

"Today's sentencing demonstrates that the police and partners within the criminal justice system will bring those responsible for terrorising people to court and that those who are made amenable can expect to receive substantial sentences."
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IamSundogOffline
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PostPosted: 22-05-2013 16:39    Post subject: Reply with quote

ramonmercado wrote:
Full text at link.

Quote:
In Virginia's Fairfax County, Robbing Banks for the CIA
By Tom Schoenberg
http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-04-18/in-virginias-fairfax-county-robbing-banks-for-the-cia#p1



What an incredible story! Would make a great thriller!
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 07-06-2013 08:11    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fake Microsoft callers scamming thousands
Telephone scammers who pretend to be Microsoft representatives have left thousands of Britons out of pocket after gaining access to their PCs.
By Olivia Goldhill
3:27PM BST 06 Jun 2013

The cold callers claim to be from Microsoft IT support and warn homeowners that they have a problem with their PC, but then install viruses and steal data once they've been given permission to log on.

Victims are also charged for the service, as the fake Microsoft representatives tell homeowners to buy an annual support contract or protection plan to help prevent system crashes.

The investigation by consumer watchdog Which? found that 18 per cent of those targeted had their credit cards used fraudulently and more than half of victims had problems with their computer after following instructions from the cold callers.

The average amount lost each time was £745 and according to Microsoft figures, one in five people have received one of these calls since 2010. Elderly people are a main target of the scheme, with half of victims aged 55 years old or over.
Microsoft's chief security adviser Stuart Aston said: "It's a dreadful crime. It targets vulnerable, often elderly people, and it can cost them a large amount of money."
He said the schemes could help criminals build up a small fortune from their victims' losses.

Matthew Bath, editor of Which? Computing said: " If you have ever been a victim of fraud or data theft, then you will know how violated you feel. Your information, such as bank accounts and personal details, are digitally vacuumed up and used by scammers to line their pockets.
"One of the most blatant is the 'Microsoft IT support' phone con. Victims are phoned by a criminal pretending to be a representative from Microsoft. They will claim that there is a problem with your PC and that they can fix it for you.
"Give permission and they will log onto your PC, often installing viruses, stealing data and then charging you for the privilege.
"And it's all lies. No reputable company will phone you up saying your PC needs fixing. They simply don't know the health of your PC. They prey on your fear that something might be wrong. It has to stop."

The callers make use of customers' implicit trust of the Microsoft brand to carry out their scam, and Which? Computing said that their name had also been used to target victims.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/microsoft/10103649/Fake-Microsoft-callers-scamming-thousands.html

I've had a few of these calls - I always tell the caller to 'Go away' (or something stronger!)
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 25-06-2013 08:12    Post subject: Reply with quote

One I missed earlier:

Fraud warning after Devon and Cornwall burglaries
9:00am Sunday 28th April 2013 in News .

Police are issuing a warning after people have been defrauded of thousands of pounds following burglaries at premises across Devon and Cornwall.
The most recent occurrences were on 18 April when members of staff at doctors’ surgeries in Liskeard and Newton Abbot had their wallets stolen.

In the days following the thefts, the victims received bogus phone calls which have led to fraudulent activity.
In both cases the caller, claiming to be from their bank, told the victim that arrests had been made and their property had been recovered.

The caller then requested the victim’s bank pin codes to verify their account allowing them to make large withdrawals and purchases using the victim’s details.

After initial enquires, police have identified a series of crimes with similar circumstances at business such as hotels, a golf club and a hospital in such areas as Liskeard, Tiverton, Exeter (4), St Austell, Ottery St Mary and Chulmleigh.

PC Phil Tucker explained: “We believe this to be a professional outfit operating across the Force area and not likely to be anyone known to the victims. We would emphasise people to challenge unknown people even if they appear to be staff.”
“Police are advising people to be vigilant when dealing with unsolicited calls.”

Banks and Building Societies will never ask for PIN numbers or sensitive information to be disclosed over the phone. If in any doubt take the contact details and phone the police.

www.actionfraud.org is a website that offers information and advice about the common and current frauds/scams that occur. It also offers advice on how to deal and prevent it.

Anyone who has any information is asked to please call police on 101 quoting crime ref. BD/13/546.

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/10376547.Fraud_warning_after_Devon_and_Cornwall_burglaries/?ref=mr
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