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Gold Bricking, Grifting, Hustling, Cons, Conmen and Frauds
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SpookdaddyOffline
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PostPosted: 30-06-2013 18:26    Post subject: Reply with quote

Spookdaddy wrote:
gncxx wrote:
A friend of mine was out driving in the countryside - I was in the passenger seat - when he stopped for a foreign man apparently broken down at the side of the road. He tried to persuade us to give him money in exchange for a ring, but we fobbed him off by telling him to phone the operator for the number of a nearby garage.

He seemed genuinely stuck, though there was no way we were giving him cash, but after reading the above I wonder. Anyone hear of a roadside variation?


I have heard of a variation which involves someone supposedly in car related trouble claiming that they've lost their credit cards and offering, apparently out of desperation, a gold ring in exchange for cash. I think this variation might also be mentioned somewhere in the link.

Sounds very much like your scenario...


There's apparently been a mini-epidemic of this scam along and close by the A515 (Lichfield area, up through Ashbourne and into the Peak District).

Drivers beware.
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gncxxOffline
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PostPosted: 30-06-2013 21:38    Post subject: Reply with quote

I encountered it in Southern Scotland, so they're certainly getting about. Wonder if it's the same bloke?
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PostPosted: 01-07-2013 07:12    Post subject: Reply with quote

gncxx wrote:
I encountered it in Southern Scotland, so they're certainly getting about. Wonder if it's the same bloke?


It is being associated with the activities of certain members of - how shall I put it - the non-statically housed mobile minority.
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rynner2Online
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PostPosted: 26-07-2013 14:47    Post subject: Reply with quote

eburacum wrote:
And in Bagdad
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-22266225
Quote:
Fake bomb detectors still being used in Baghdad
23 April 2013 Last updated at 17:25

A corrupt British businessman has been convicted of fraud after a jury found him guilty of a multi-million pound scam selling bogus bomb detecting equipment around the world.

Iraq spent more than $40m (£26.2m) on 6,000 of Jim McCormick's fake devices between 2008 and 2010.

Despite the authorities in the UK establishing the bomb detectors were useless in 2012, the BBC's Ben Brown discovered they were still in widespread use in Baghdad while filming there in March 2013

It seems McCormick wasn't the only one:

Gary Bolton guilty of selling fake bomb detectors

A businessman has been found guilty of making and selling fake bomb detectors.
The Old Bailey heard the devices made by Gary Bolton, 47, were nothing more than boxes with handles and antennae.
The prosecution said he sold them for up to £10,000 each, claiming they could detect explosives. The trial heard that the company had a £3m annual turnover selling the homemade devices.
Bolton, of Redshank Road in Chatham, Kent, had denied two charges of fraud. Sentencing has been adjourned.

Richard Whittam QC, prosecuting, told the court Mr Bolton knew the devices - which were also alleged to be able to detect drugs, tobacco, ivory and cash - did not work but supplied them anyway to be sold to overseas businesses.

They were made at Bolton's Kent home and at the offices of Global Technology Ltd.
Mr Whittam said one company X-rayed a device and found nothing inside the box. Shocked
He said tests on the detectors, carried out as far back as 2001, had suggested they performed no better than random searches for explosives.

Jurors found Bolton guilty of a charge of making an article for use in the course of fraud and one of supplying an article for use in the course of fraud between January 2007 and July last year.

Bolton claimed that the devices worked with a range of 766 yards (700m) at ground level and as far as two and half miles (4km) in the air and said they were effective through lead-lined and metal walls, water, containers and earth.

But "double-blind" tests on a Mole device as early as 2001 showed it had a successful detection rate of 9%, with Bolton sent the test results.

Sentencing was adjourned to a later, unfixed date and Bolton was released on conditional bail.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-23461638
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PostPosted: 09-08-2013 09:26    Post subject: Reply with quote

Man who created own credit card sues bank for not sticking to terms
When Dmitry Argarkov was sent a letter offering him a credit card, he found the rates not to his liking.
By Andrew Trotman
4:41PM BST 08 Aug 2013

But he didn't throw the contract away or shred it. Instead, the 42-year-old from Voronezh, Russia, scanned it into his computer, altered the terms and sent it back to Tinkoff Credit Systems.

Mr Argarkov's version of the contract contained a 0pc interest rate, no fees and no credit limit. Every time the bank failed to comply with the rules, he would fine them 3m rubles (£58,716). If Tinkoff tried to cancel the contract, it would have to pay him 6m rubles.
Tinkoff apparently failed to read the amendments, signed the contract and sent Mr Argakov a credit card. Shocked

"The Bank confirmed its agreement to the client's terms and sent him a credit card and a copy of the approved application form," his lawyer Dmitry Mikhalevich told Kommersant. "The opened credit line was unlimited. He could afford to buy an island somewhere in Malaysia, and the bank would have to pay for it by law."

However, Tinkoff attempted to close the account due to overdue payments. It sued Mr Argakov for 45,000 rubles for fees and charges that were not in his altered version of the contract. Cool

Earlier this week a Russian judge ruled in Mr Argakov's favour. Tinkoff had signed the contract and was legally bound to it. Mr Argakov was only ordered to pay an outstanding balance of 19,000 rubles (£371).

"They signed the documents without looking. They said what usually their borrowers say in court: 'We have not read it',” said Mr Mikhalevich. Twisted Evil

But now Mr Argakov has taken matters one step further. He is suing Tinkoff for 24m rubles for not honouring the contract and breaking the agreement.
Tinkoff has launched its own legal action, accusing Mr Argakov of fraud.

Oleg Tinkov, founder of the bank, tweeted: "Our lawyers think he is going to get not 24m, but really 4 years in prison for fraud. Now it's a matter of principle for @tcsbanktwitter."
The court will review Mr Argakov's case next month.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/borrowing/creditcards/10231556/Man-who-created-own-credit-card-sues-bank-for-not-sticking-to-terms.html
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rynner2Online
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PostPosted: 14-08-2013 10:46    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cornwall couple stole £1.1m from hospital and spent it on Turkish villa.
WMN by David Wells.
Wednesday, August 14, 2013.

A couple who splashed out on a Turkish villa and home improvements at their country pile using £1.1m stolen from hospital bosses have been jailed for a total of ten years.
Andrew Baker, 65, and his wife, Anne, 61, installed cascading waterfalls and fountains in the grounds of their sprawling 2.5 acre Grade II listed estate in Cornwall.
Manderley, built in the 17th Century near Launceston, is a popular venue for couples to hold lavish weddings, boasting its own golf course, exotic bird aviary and koi carp lake.

The Bakers also invested almost £100,000 in a luxury villa in Bodrum, Turkey, and owned two Jaguars and an Aston Martin.

Belfast-born Mrs Baker swiped the cash during a ‘breathtaking’ 13-year con while she worked as a radiology department manager at the Princess Grace Hospital in Marylebone, central London.
Using her maiden name, Fitzpatrick, she pocketed £1,142,101.02 by submitting a string of bogus invoices to a fictional radiologist, Dr Baker, for consultancy services.
The ‘well-oiled’ fraud – which allowed Mrs Baker to take home four times her monthly salary – took place between 1998 and 2012, when the hospital was run by HCA International.

Mr Baker, who met his current wife in 1971 after divorcing a former partner, knew ‘full well’ what his wife was up to and was a key beneficiary of the loot, Southwark Crown Court heard.
He also transferred £85,000 into two Turkish bank accounts and stashed £25,000 in a gun cupboard at his home.

Jailing Mr Baker for six years and his wife for four years, the judge, Mr Recorder David Aaronberg QC said: ‘It beggars belief to suggest that (Mr Baker) thought this was all legitimate income. He tried to fool the jury and they didn’t fall for it.

‘It was very easy for Mrs Baker, in a position of trust, to create a fictional doctor, to submit invoices in his name. She was in a gross breach of trust over more than 13 years.
‘Previous good character only goes so far when it comes to offending behaviour of this kind.’

The judge told Mr Baker: ‘I take the view that you are equally culpable, you chose to contest this matter and you deceived the jury and the court with your explanations which were patently untrue.’

Mrs Baker, wearing glasses, an orange tartan-style jacket and an orange and white patterned shirt, and her husband, sporting a moustache, burgundy polo shirt and brown jacket, showed no emotion as sentence was passed.

Mr Baker claimed he had ‘no idea whatsoever’ about his wife’s wrongdoing, insisting he had obtained the cash legitimately from his late father and the sale of a flat in Putney, southwest London.
He also said his wife had received a bonus of £132,000 when she retired from the hospital in 2008.
But a jury of seven women and five men convicted Mr Baker of two counts of money laundering following a week-long trial.

Anne Baker admitted false accounting and money laundering prior to her husband’s case.
She authorised forged invoices around once a month, with annual amounts varying between £80,000 and £179,000.

The couple, who run A&A Venues, raked in a fortune hosting events at the newly-transformed Manderley, which features a 30ft pond with a ‘large cascading waterfall‘, a pitch and putt golf course, an outdoor swimming pool, exotic bird aviary and extensive gardens.
The Bodrum villa was purchased in September 2007 before £85,000 was transferred to Guaranteed Bank accounts which had Andrew Baker’s name ‘all over them’.
A further £88,882 was spent on building work at Manderley, with even more cash ploughed into landscaping projects.

Prosecutor Hugh Forgan told jurors that their genuine earnings were ‘dwarfed’ by their ill-gotten gains.
’Mr Baker turned the house in Cornwall into something rather splendid,’ said Mr Forgan.
‘The defendant knew he could afford it because he knew full well what his wife was up to.’

Mrs Baker is now bankrupt and continues to insist her husband was oblivious to her deception.

Justin Rivett, defending Mrs Baker, claimed she had turned to crime because she found it ‘very difficult to make ends meet’.
’She accepts full responsibility for her actions,’ he added.
‘Initially she hadn’t set out to defraud her employers over a long period of time but events just simply carried on.
‘The fraud was not of a sophisticated nature.
’She spent a lot of money and most of it did go on Manderley but it was a large property and expensive to maintain.
‘They did not go on a large number of expensive foreign holidays.’

Priya Malhotra, defending Mr Baker, a qualified civil engineer who has worked on contracts for the US and British military, said he was not the main player in the fraud.
‘It is squarely on the shoulders of his wife.’

Andrew Baker, of Manderley, South Petherwin, Launceston, denied two counts of money laundering.
Anne Baker, of the same address, admitted two charges of money laundering and false accounting.

A statement released by HCA Hospitals and the Princess Grace Hospital said: ‘HCA welcomes the jury’s verdict that Mr Baker is guilty of money laundering. Mr and Mrs Baker conducted systematic and ongoing criminal acts and both were complicit in the planning and cover-up of their actions.
‘HCA operates with rigorous financial procedures but criminals will always seek ways of circumventing and misleading. Like any company, we will continue to review and improve systems to ensure similar cases cannot happen again.
‘We would like to thank the Met Police for its diligence and professionalism in bringing Mr and Mrs Baker to justice.’

Detective Constable Julie Jode, of Westminster CID, said: ‘I am pleased that Andrew Baker has been found guilty of money laundering. The overwhelming evidence against his wife, Anne Baker, led her to plead guilty.
’She abused her position of authority by fraudulently taking money that did not belong to her and Andrew Baker was aware of this and directly benefited from her illegal actions. They both enjoyed a decadent lifestyle through criminal gains at the expense of HCA Hospitals.

http://www.cornishman.co.uk/Cornwall-couple-stole-1-1m-hospital-spent-Turkish/story-19651619-detail/story.html
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PostPosted: 19-10-2013 08:09    Post subject: Reply with quote

Towcester property swindle couple jailed

A married couple from Northamptonshire who posed as wealthy high fliers have been jailed for a multi-million pound property swindle.
Richard Jerome posed as an international financier and created a £3.5m fraud in which he tried to buy a luxury home.
He and his wife Hazel, of Watling Street Towcester, posed as rich ex pats who had returned from Barbados.
Mr Jerome was jailed for six years and his wife to two years and three months.

Ex minicab driver Mr Jerome, 65, who was living off his £125 a week state pension and his wife, a former Milton Keynes primary school teacher, were sentenced by Judge Erik Salomonsen after being found guilty of a dozen counts of fraud.
Judge Salomonsen told Jerome: "You are a confidence trickster, you are a menace. You are a fraudster whose motivation is profit without working for it."

The Jeromes were finally brought down when estate agents and surveyors learned about their true identity from newspaper cuttings from their conviction at Huntingdon Crown Court in 2009 when Jerome served just a quarter of a 15 month jail term.
The court heard Mr Jerome was committing other frauds while awaiting that trial.

Prosecutor Peter Combe said the Jeromes worked together as a team with him "taking the lead and doing the talking" and his wife telling vendors about their "fantastical lifestyle".

Mr Jerome, who also claimed to be a policeman, targeted rich professional single women along the way.
He used aliases to go on dating websites to attract rich women telling them he was a multi millionaire with global business interests and a £1m a year income.
He duped an experienced woman financier into investing $100,000 and a headmistress he also dated after meeting on the web into handing over £10,000.

During a trial at Exeter Crown Court, a jury heard they made cash offers of more than £3.5m on a £310,000 cliff top home in East Looe, Cornwall, the £750,000 former home of writer R F Delderfield in Sidmouth, Devon, as well as a £2m farm property near Daventry, Northamptonshire, and a £560,000 house in the same area.

They aimed to persuade the owners to let them move in while the deal was being closed as funds were transferred from abroad - but there was no money - and the couple became middle class squatters who refused to budge or pay rent.

They had previously been convicted for doing the same thing as they squatted in high value homes around the UK. One of their victims then was a leading criminal barrister and her late husband.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-beds-bucks-herts-24588817
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rynner2Online
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PostPosted: 19-10-2013 10:05    Post subject: Reply with quote

A worrying case:

'Our £130,000 bill from identity theft'
A stolen passport landed one British couple with a huge demand from the German taxman, who won't back down.
By Jessica Winch
7:38AM BST 19 Oct 2013

A British businessman is facing financial hardship after suffering a serious case of identity fraud, a crime that experts warn is a growing problem across Britain.

Adrian Richards, a project manager at a construction firm who lives in London, is currently liable for a £130,000 unpaid tax bill in Germany and has had to hire solicitors to fight a £34,000 court order.
The nightmare stems from the theft of Mr Richards's passport in 2003. Fraud experts describe it as one of the worst cases they have encountered.

Identity fraud is when a criminal takes someone's personal details and uses them to obtain credit or make a purchase fraudulently.
The same stolen identity can be used in applications for loans and credit cards, for example, as well as multiple benefit claims and tax evasion.
The result can be immediate financial loss and a negative credit rating, which can take months to resolve – even longer if it takes time for the fraud to be detected.

According to figures from Cifas, a British fraud database, 123,600 cases of identity fraud were reported in 2012, up from 77,500 in 2007. Identity fraud now accounts for more than half of all fraud in Britain. The National Fraud Authority, a government body, puts the annual cost of identity fraud at £3.3bn.

"The numbers aren't huge but they are growing," said Neil Munroe, external affairs director of credit agency Equifax.
"A clever fraudster can build up a very strong profile of you and it can reach the stage where the question is: who is the fraudster?" Shocked

Mr Richards, 47, has been chased by the German tax authorities, communicating though HM Revenue & Customs, since 2010, with the order for unpaid VAT initially dropped but then renewed.
"I've never had any business in Germany," he said, "and it's a desperate situation. I don't know the German tax system or how to appeal and HMRC just seems to play postbox."

Earlier this year Mr Richards faced a £34,000 court order after his passport – with a different photograph – was used to set up a communications company in the Isle of Man. The company was fined for breaching codes of practice and the order was delivered to Mr Richards's home.
"The court order was signed for by my 14-year-old son on a Saturday morning, which I had to deal with – or turn up at the Royal Courts of Justice," said Mr Richards. "It threatened my property."
He sought legal representation and the order was withdrawn, but the process cost him £450 in legal fees.

Mr Richards said he believed that the tax bill from Germany was part of the same fraud.
He may now have to employ a German solicitor at a cost of €200 (£170) an hour to tackle the bill. "The reality is that unless I get this cleared up I'm liable for a vast amount of money," he said. "To pay this fine, I'd have to remortgage my house.
"The scary thing is this passport is still valid [the expiry date was extended by the criminal] and who knows what else lies around the corner?"

HMRC said it was not its responsibility to intervene on Mr Richards's behalf. "We can support UK residents in how to contact the member country, but cannot get involved in details of whether the tax is correctly applied," said a spokesman. "If the taxpayer disputes the debt, they have to take that up with the member country and follow the country's own appeals process."
A spokesman for the German tax authority said it could not comment on Mr Richards's case because of privacy laws.

Alan Woodward, professor of computer science at the University of Surrey, said: "Identity theft is becoming simpler and an increasing problem. The burden of proof is on the person whose identity has been stolen.
"The debts get passed to debt collection agencies and assume a life of their own."
Figures from Cifas showed that there were 947 reported frauds using forged or stolen passports between January and September this year, up from 545 in 2012.

Prof Woodward said the move to biometric passports would make it harder for thieves to tamper with them. More than 40 million biometric passports have been issued since their introduction in 2006.

etc...

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/consumertips/10388791/Our-130000-bill-from-identity-theft.html
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rynner2Online
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PostPosted: 16-11-2013 08:51    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner2 wrote:
A worrying case:

'Our £130,000 bill from identity theft'
A stolen passport landed one British couple with a huge demand from the German taxman, who won't back down.
By Jessica Winch
7:38AM BST 19 Oct 2013

A British businessman is facing financial hardship after suffering a serious case of identity fraud, a crime that experts warn is a growing problem across Britain.

Adrian Richards, a project manager at a construction firm who lives in London, is currently liable for a £130,000 unpaid tax bill in Germany and has had to hire solicitors to fight a £34,000 court order.
The nightmare stems from the theft of Mr Richards's passport in 2003. Fraud experts describe it as one of the worst cases they have encountered.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/consumertips/10388791/Our-130000-bill-from-identity-theft.html

At last, the good news:

Germany's taxman backs down in UK's worst case of identity theft
Telegraph story brings victory for Adrian Richards in three-year battle against tax authorities
By Jessica Winch
7:16AM GMT 16 Nov 2013

A British man who faced a crippling tax bill in Germany as a result of identity fraud has finally won his case with the authorities.

In a victory for the Telegraph, which first ran the story on October 19, the German tax authorities have confirmed that they are no longer pursuing unpaid VAT totalling more than £110,000 from Adrian Richards.

Mr Richards, 47, has battled with the authorities since 2010 over the unpaid tax bill, which resulted from an alarming case of identity fraud. "Hopefully, this is the end of it," Mr Richards said. "It is a great relief."

The project manager at a construction firm in London had his passport stolen in 2003. Earlier this year, he faced a £34,000 court order after his passport, with a different photograph, was used to set up a communications company in the Isle of Man that was fined for breaching codes of practice.

The legal process following the court order uncovered the doctored passport, which led Mr Richards to believe his battle over unpaid VAT in Germany was also the result of identity fraud. He wrote to HM Revenue & Customs in July to explain the case but continued to receive demands for the unpaid tax.

Experts described Mr Richards's case of identity fraud – where a criminal takes someone's details and uses them to make a purchase or obtain credit – as one of the worst they had encountered.
Jim Gee, director of counter fraud services at accountancy firm BDO, said: "This case shows three things. First, the positive power of the press – without the Telegraph's intervention I have no doubt that it would not have been resolved.
"Second, the importance of getting specialist advice when faced with such a problem. And, finally, it shows the seriousness of identity fraud and the importance of the Government taking it seriously and standing up for British citizens."

According to figures from Cifas, a British fraud database, 123,600 cases of identity fraud were reported in 2012, up from 77,500 in 2007. Identity fraud now accounts for more than half of all fraud in Britain.

It was understood that Mr Richards owed more than £130,000 to German tax authorities. HMRC has since admitted this was its error and confirmed the correct figure was £113,028.

Following our article, the British tax office wrote to the German tax authorities in October asking them to close the case after "further investigations" suggested that they were pursuing the wrong person. In a letter seen by the Telegraph, an HMRC official wrote: "Further investigations in our office suggest that we are pursuing the wrong person for the above debt so I have written to Germany asking them to agree that I can close this case."

The German tax authorities swiftly dropped the case, accepting Mr Richards was a victim of identity theft.

Mr Richards said: "It is very frustrating that we have had to go through all this. It took the interest of a number of parties for [HMRC] to take a view on the situation. As soon as it stepped in, the German authorities withdrew their claim." He is now considering a formal complaint.

Cathy Richards, 51, said: "Adrian is very organised and has folders dating back to when this first started. It just got progressively more difficult.
"Despite [HMRC] saying they couldn’t intervene, they obviously have. It has cost us time, money and stress. You wonder if it happened to someone else, would they have been able to afford a solicitor."

An HMRC spokesman said: "Our process is that we send a copy of the dispute to the member state and ask if it is valid or not. We cannot get involved in the detail of whether or not the tax is correctly applied as per our agreement with Germany."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/consumertips/tax/10450034/Germanys-taxman-backs-down-in-UKs-worst-case-of-identity-theft.html
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PostPosted: 14-12-2013 10:11    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why your 'free' sample could cost you £90
Trading Standards warning over scam
9:33am Friday 13th December 2013 in News

A series of complaints has led to Cornwall Council Trading Standards warning internet shoppers to be careful when responding to “pop-up” or other special offers when on the internet.

Complaints received show that customers who have responded to the offer of a free sample of face cream for “only £4.95” to cover postage and packing, to be paid by credit or debit card, have later been hit with charges of up to £90 drawn directly from their bank account.

When charges have been questioned, the traders state that their terms and conditions detail the free sample must be returned within 14 days or a monthly subscription kicks in.
The company looks as though it operates from Scotland; however the originator is based in the USA.

Julia Groves, Cornwall Trading Standards authorised officer, said: “We are encouraging anyone who has responded to such offers for products, including face cream and slimming tablets, to report the matter to the Citizens Advice Consumer Centre on 08454 04 05 06 and Action Fraud at 0300 123 2040 or by visiting their website at http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/

“We are reiterating to consumers not only at Christmas time but at all times of the year, not to respond to offers which seem too good to be true as invariably they are.
“Experience tells us that victims of these sorts of scams face a great deal of time spent on recovering their money through the card provider. At the very least you should carefully read any terms and conditions and know the physical whereabouts of any traders that you deal with.”

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/10875752.Why_your__free__sample_could_cost_you___90____Trading_Standards_warning_over_scam/?ref=mr
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PostPosted: 21-12-2013 19:18    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
'Jet-set' teenager Reece Scobie admits more cons
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-tayside-central-25465663

Scobie is already serving a prison sentence for committing similar offences

A teenage conman who lived a jet-set lifestyle on stolen credit cards has admitted a further series of frauds.

Reece Scobie, who was 19 at the time, is currently serving a 16-month sentence in Scotland for fraudulently funding a globetrotting lifestyle.

He has now admitted a further nine charges, which included using stolen credit cards to book trains, flights and hotel accommodation.

Sentence was deferred at Southwark Crown Court in London.

The court heard Scobie, from Rait in Perthshire, used popular websites, such as trainline.com and ebooker.com to fund and travel the globe.

Kieran Moroney, defending, said that Scobie was currently appealing his conviction for his previous fraud offences which netted more than £70,000.

Travel agent
Judge John Price told Scobie: "You are serving a sentence in Scotland, you are appealing against that sentence and we don't know what is going to happen with that so I am going to grant you technical bail to get you back to Scotland and to help you get things sorted out as quickly as we can.

"As soon as you are released in Scotland you must notify this court of your date of release".

Scobie was jailed at Perth Sheriff Court in October after being compared to Leonardo Di Caprio's conman character in the film Catch Me If You Can.

The court was told Scobie's con started within weeks of him being taken on as a trainee travel agent by Thomson Travel in the St John's Shopping Centre in Perth.

He was able to access accounts and passwords allowing him to book flights and accommodation.

Among the trips he took were business class flights to Singapore and Los Angeles.

He also booked round the world trips, taking in locations such as Dubai, Auckland, Atlanta, New York and Vancouver.

He was eventually caught while on a trip to Los Angeles.
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PostPosted: 09-01-2014 07:08    Post subject: Reply with quote

'Dead' con woman Juliet Clarke tricked boyfriends

A woman who claimed to have terminal cancer - and later pretended to be dead - to con money from her boyfriends, has been given a suspended jail sentence.
Juliet Clarke also tried to dupe one man after he ended their relationship, by claiming she had given birth to his premature twins.

The 31-year-old, of Lawhitton near Launceston, Cornwall, admitted three counts of fraud.
Judge Paul Darlow jailed Clarke for 10 months, suspended for two years.
She was also ordered to pay £2,000 compensation to the men she defrauded.

Prosecutor Jenny Cater earlier told the hearing at Plymouth Crown Court that Clarke dated her first victim for six months in 2011.
She convinced him she was dying and borrowed money from him while waiting for a fictional £250,000 inheritance from her grandmother.
After they split up, he noticed that she had taken nearly £2,000 from his bank account, but when he tried to contact her, Clarke sent him a string of messages pretending to be her father and claiming she had died.

The second victim was a soldier Clarke met via the internet while he was serving in Afghanistan.
She told him she was suffering from ovarian and cervical cancer and asked if she could borrow money for the funeral of a non-existent uncle, claiming various members of her family had died and she was due to inherit £34,000.

The court heard when he finished their relationship, Clarke tried to get money from him by saying she was pregnant with twins.
She claimed a photograph from a 2007 New York Times pregnancy guide showed her swollen stomach and when he started to become suspicious, she said she had given birth to premature twins.
Clarke sent emails announcing the birth of twins with a photo of two premature babies and said she had named the boys Daniel Lee and Ethan Mark.

But the court heard no births were registered, Clarke had never been pregnant - and had been sterilised some years before. Shocked

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-25655463

All rather sad, really...
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ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
Total posts: 20926
Location: Dublin
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PostPosted: 09-01-2014 13:00    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sad indeed. Given the effort involved she didn't make a lot from the cons. She might well have psychological problems.
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rynner2Online
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25754
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 19-01-2014 18:40    Post subject: Reply with quote

£100,000 painting stolen from Kensington home in scam

A £100,000 painting, items of jewellery and bank cards have been stolen from the London home of an 89-year-old woman.
A telephone caller told the victim her bank cards had been used in a crime and advised her to call her bank.
But he did not hang up and she was then told someone would come on Saturday and collect her cards and valuable items.

A man came to her South Kensington home and took the painting, 'The Comet of 1858' by Samuel Palmer, and jewellery.
The victim has described the man as being in his 30s, about 5ft 10in tall, with dark hair and an English accent.

A Met spokesman said: "Neither your bank nor the police would ever ring you and state that they are coming to your home to pick up your card, so never hand it over to anyone who comes to collect it."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-25802145
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ChrisBoardmanOffline
Great Old One
Joined: 17 May 2011
Total posts: 740
Location: Alton, Hampshire
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 20-01-2014 13:56    Post subject: Reply with quote

Does buying a Man Utd ticket class as getting ripped-off these days?
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