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Celebs and saucers
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coalyOffline
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PostPosted: 21-02-2011 15:11    Post subject: Reply with quote

Then you get 3, (especially this one!) 4 and 6,(More naivity due to the time)... which are clearly either taking the piss, or mentally ill! Confused
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eburacumOffline
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PostPosted: 22-02-2011 19:59    Post subject: Reply with quote

the loonygraph wrote:
Alien life and UFOs: 10 top 'believers'
NASA research has found that half of all stars in the universe have Earth-like planets orbiting around them, raising fresh hopes of finding alien life.
NASA have found no such thing, unless you define 'Earth-like' in very broad terms. In fact no definite Earth-like planets have yet been found.
Quote:
Numerous public figures from eminent scientists to politicians have stated their belief in the existence of alien life forms and UFOs.
Two entirely different things, as Linesmachine points out.
Quote:
Here we take a look at some of the most notable claims:
1. Professor Stephen Hawking
Hawking has some very sensible speculation about alien life, but does not mention UFOs.
Quote:
2. Lord Rees
The Astronomer Royal has some very sensible speculation about alien life, but does not mention UFOs.
Quote:
3. Lachezar Filipov
An idiot.
Quote:
4. Edgar Mitchell
Mitchell has never seen a UFO or an alien, and most of his claims are based on hearsay- which hearsay, according to some sources, is based on misunderstandings and an unshakeable 'will-to-believe' without any actual evidence.
Quote:
5. Jimmy Carter
His sighting seems to have been a misidentification of Venus.
Quote:
6. General Douglas MacArthurThe Korean and Second World War soldier, said in 1955 that "the next war will be an interplanetary war. The nations of the earth must someday make a common front against attack by people from other planets. The politics of the future will be cosmic, or interplanetary".
An interesting statement, but self-evidently completely wrong. The next war was against Vietnam, followed by many other terrestrial conflicts.
Quote:
7. Monsignor Corrado Balducci
Also a leading Demonologist and Exorcist. Our world would be much less culturally rich without people like him; but he believes in numerous impossible things before breakfast.
Quote:
8. Air Chief Marshal Lord Dowding
More hearsay from another daft old coot.
Quote:
9. Ronald Reagan
Aha! A first-hand experience - from a daft old coot.
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10. Mikhail Gorbachev The USSR's last head of state: "The phenomenon of UFOs does exist, and it must be treated seriously"
Actually quite a sensible statement, on the face of it. The phenomenon exists, so it should be taken seriously. But no evidence of a link between ET and UFOs can be established -not yet, anyway.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 22-02-2011 21:13    Post subject: Reply with quote

eburacum wrote:
Quote:
5. Jimmy Carter
His sighting seems to have been a misidentification of Venus.

I've heard this allegation before, but can you give any sources for it?

Naturally, I want dates, times and places, and original referenced reports!

(I could search the internet for such stuff myself, but I feel it's only fair that anyone who propagates such allegations should be prepared to back them up with evidence himself. Scepticism works both ways, you know! Wink )
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eburacumOffline
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PostPosted: 22-02-2011 22:03    Post subject: Reply with quote

try
http://www.debunker.com/texts/carter_ufo.html

Sheaffer's thesis rests on the apparent fact that Carter totally misremembered the date and location. On the face of it this seems quite possible. Memory is a terrible guide in these cases.
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gncxxOffline
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PostPosted: 22-03-2011 18:51    Post subject: Reply with quote

Full story:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20110321/music_nm/us_sammyhagar_aliens

Quote:
"Red" rocker Sammy Hagar says abducted by aliens
Mon Mar 21, 7:31 am ET

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – No doubt Sammy Hagar, a former lead singer for Van Halen, has enjoyed a lot of far out experiences in life, but on Monday, the rocker told perhaps his farthest out tale to MTV. He was abducted by aliens.

Or, at least, his brain was.

In an interview for his new book, "Red: My Uncensored Life in Rock" at mtvhive.com, Hagar lets go of what even he admits might make him "sound like a crazy person" to some readers.

He and the reporter are talking about dreams he claims to have had about UFOs, and when asked whether he believed he had been abducted, Hagar answers: "I think I have."

The reporter seemed surprised. "What? Really? I was kidding. You seriously believe that?" he asks.

Hagar laughs and goes on to explain that a passage in the book described as a dream in which he is contacted by aliens from outer space in California was, in fact, reality.

The tale describes how the beings tapped into his mind through a wireless connection.

"It was real," Hagar told the reporter, according to the story on MTV's Hive website. "They were plugged into me. It was a download situation ... Or, they uploaded something from my brain, like an experiment."

Hagar goes on to describe another experience at the age of four where he believes he saw an alien space ship in broad daylight hovering over a country field where his family lived...


Well that's one way to sell your book. Now we must know what was so vital about Mr Hagar's mind that the aliens needed to delve into it. It could answer a loooot of questions.
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sherbetbizarreOffline
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PostPosted: 23-03-2011 18:45    Post subject: Reply with quote

More with Hager:

http://www.roadrunnerrecords.com/blabbermouth.net/news.aspx?mode=Article&newsitemID=155644
Quote:
"It was real, (aliens) were plugged into me. It was a download situation. This was long before computers or any kind of wireless. There weren't even wireless telephones. Looking back now, it was like, 'Fuck, they downloaded something into me!' Or they uploaded something from my brain, like an experiment."
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MoookstaOffline
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PostPosted: 27-04-2011 22:15    Post subject: Reply with quote

SOURCE: THE GUARDIAN

Quote:

David Bowie, Muse and the Klaxons: talents so huge it's only logical that aliens would want them for research

When aliens tire of abducting, internally investigating, memory-wiping and giving a three-day hangover to the prime specimens of our species – ie meth-addled hicks driving drunk near air force bases at midnight – their second most popular group of test subjects tend to be rock musicians. Particularly those who overdid it in the 60s and have books to flog. Last month was typical, revealing ex-Van Halen singer Sammy Hagar to have been a victim of the Venusian Butt Blender since age four. Rock history, however, is dotted with extra-terrestrial encounters, inter-dimensional communications and getting, like, really freaked out by blimps.

An absolutely-sober-honest Bernard Sumner says he saw the mothership hovering over Glastonbury's Sacred Space one year. The Troggs' Reg Presley became so obsessed with crop circles in his post-fame years that he wrote a book about it. The autobiography of the Kinks' Dave Davies tells of being contacted – by smell, no less – by five alien intelligences in a Virginia hotel. George Clinton and Sun Ra have purported to be aliens among us, and only partly as a metaphor for racial discrimination.

It might be reasonable to assume that all these stars were receiving scrambled messages from Space Station DRUGS. But with so much evidence orbiting rock's stratosphere, can they all be wrong?



The article then goes on to describe the UFO experiences of Hagar (again), Bowie, The Klaxons, Lemmy, Matt Bellamy and Jim Sullivan. (Sullivan's story could easily transfer over to the "People who just disappear" thread given he "just disappeared".) The article sits safely on the fence with all it's reports.
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YithianOffline
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PostPosted: 27-08-2011 09:07    Post subject: Reply with quote

eburacum wrote:
the loonygraph wrote:

Quote:
8. Air Chief Marshal Lord Dowding
More hearsay from another daft old coot.


No, not a daft old coot. A very intelligent and brave man to whom we should be very grateful. Nonetheless, his over-credulity is, for me, brought into question by his corresponding beliefs in fairies, and I think, Spiritualism. Once you become a serial-believer (as it were), the chance of your being right against the odds in each individual belief is diminished significantly; cf. David Icke, among others.

That said, as an long-serving and experienced airman and commander of airmen, his opinions should be given some enhanced degree of credence when discussing UFOs in particular; pilot sightings have constituted some of the best and most well-substantiated data in a field awash with speculation, misapprehension, wishful-thinking, and outright fraud.
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kamalktkOffline
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PostPosted: 27-08-2011 12:04    Post subject: Reply with quote

Moooksta wrote:
the Venusian Butt Blender

Laughing
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eburacumOffline
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PostPosted: 27-08-2011 17:12    Post subject: Reply with quote

theyithian wrote:
eburacum wrote:
the loonygraph wrote:

Quote:
8. Air Chief Marshal Lord Dowding
More hearsay from another daft old coot.


No, not a daft old coot. A very intelligent and brave man to whom we should be very grateful.
He may have been intelligent and brave in his time, but that seems to have evaporated during his latter years.

Quote:
Nonetheless, his over-credulity is, for me, brought into question by his corresponding beliefs in fairies, and I think, Spiritualism. Once you become a serial-believer (as it were), the chance of your being right against the odds in each individual belief is diminished significantly; cf. David Icke, among others.
Absolutely. There's no reason to take a retired Air Chief Marshall seriously when he believes in fairies.

Quote:
That said, as an long-serving and experienced airman and commander of airmen, his opinions should be given some enhanced degree of credence when discussing UFOs in particular;
Not at all; he was simply reporting hearsay, in a credulous fashion.

Quote:
...pilot sightings have constituted some of the best and most well-substantiated data in a field awash with speculation, misapprehension, wishful-thinking, and outright fraud.
There is a very real possibility that pilots are more likely to misreport a distant phenomenon as a near one, because they are concerned with avoiding collisions. So pilot reports can't be taken at face value either.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 03-11-2013 11:19    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shaun Ryder on UFOs: 'It's not that I want to believe – it's impossible not to'
As singer with the Happy Mondays Shaun Ryder used to do a lot of drugs. But that doesn't explain the encounters with aliens he has turned into a new TV show, he insists
Simon Hattenstone
The Guardian, Saturday 2 November 2013

Shaun Ryder was 15 when he first saw one. He'd just started as a messenger boy at the post office, and was walking to the bus stop on Hilton Lane, Little Hulton. It was 6.45am, pitch black when he looked up into the sky. "At first it was still, and then it went, 'Voooooooom!' And then again: 'Voooooooom!' Classic zig-zag, hovered, then went off at 10,000 miles an hour. Like Star Trek. Boom. Gone. Yeah!"

Another bus stop a few months later in 1978. This time he's at Irlams o' Th' Height in Salford, it's around 5pm. "Hundreds of lights going across the sky really slow, and I'm thinking, 'God, are we being invaded?' The next day in the papers it said: 'Mysterious lights in the sky – lights at Salford rugby ground have gone mad.' And that was bullshit because when the lights at rugby grounds start moving around, it's nothing like these."

Ever since, Ryder has been obsessed with Ufology and extraterrestrial forms of life. The former Happy Mondays and Black Grape frontman gets narked with people who assume he was off his head when he saw his UFOs. Fair enough, he has spent much of his life off his head, but he insists that any time he's seen anything otherworldly he's been clean and sober.

Ryder, 50, defined the Madchester era of ecstacy-inspired dance music in the 1980s. He ranted his brilliant nonsense lyrics ("You're twistin' my melon man/ You know you talk so hip man/ You're twistin' my melon man") to an inspired, jingly-jangly rock-funk-northern-soul-house-hiphop backdrop, and somehow managed to combine pop stardom with crack-dealing and drug-fuelled psychosis. Then, in 2010, he found populist redemption in the Australian jungle with Ant and Dec and became an unlikely national treasure. Before that, television producers were terrified of what he might come out with before the watershed. He was regarded as a liability. After I'm a Celebrity, they couldn't get enough of the newly cuddly Ryder. With all the drugs he'd ingested, he should have been dead; but here he was back with spanking new teeth, a family-friendly smile, and great patter. He was invited to go on numerous reality shows, but turned them down. So telly people asked what they could do to get him back on air. UFOs, he said. And aliens.

Two years after he started investigating UFOs, Ryder is back as an author and documentary film-maker, having travelled the world looking for spooky sightings. His conclusion? He's more convinced than ever that we are not alone.

Ryder makes a convincing presenter – warm, engaging, a bit bonkers, spooked, occasionally sceptical, never cynical. He has travelled to Chile, where more UFOs have been spotted than anywhere else in the world, hooked up with legendary abductee Travis Walton, and met a perfectly normal Yorkshire family who tell him about the dazzling UFO that almost blinded them on the way back from a meal out at The Little Chef.

I ask Ryder if he went out there determined to prove that his childhood experiences were real. He looks at me with stary eyes. "It's not that I want to believe, it's just impossible not to." His voice is getting louder. "We're not the only life in the universe. We're just not. It's ridiculously impossible. If you look at the way kids are being taught now … when I was a kid at school, you was taught there was no life out there – that was it. But now kids are being taught there's water, so where there's water there will be life forms or whatever. So it's not that I want to believe, that's how it is."

...

He [...] talks about the road trip he went on with Travis Walton. In 1975 Walton was a logger when he and his crew came across a luminous flying saucer in a remote part of Arizona. The terrified crew raced to their wagon and got the hell out. When they realised they had left Walton behind, they went back to look for him. There was no sign of him. They went into town and reported the incident to the deputy sherriff. For days the whole town searched. Nothing. Five days later he reappeared and said he had been abducted by aliens. Over the years he and the crew have passed numerous polygraph tests. Walton, a man with heavy, bloodshot eyes and a lugubrious moustache, is still haunted by his expereince. "He looked like he's got post-traumatic stress disorder, like he'd walked into Vietnam, and spent two years there and come out," Ryder says. "Just imagine, even if one appeared in front of you, it would traumatise you properly. You'd go grey. Your whole world would change. Everything. It's just day one again. So you're going to look traumatised. And you spend some time with him and you just know."

Ryder and Walton make for an unlikely team, but they strike up a melancholy rapport. As a 29-year-old, Ryder says, Walton believed he'd been kidnapped and experimented on by a malign force. But now, like so many people who have come into contact with extraterrestrials, he believes they were kind; that they probably saved his life. "Now he reckons he was hit by some sort of forcefield that probably stopped his heart. These guys then took him inside and give him some medical treatmentand then let him go. That's how he looks at it now. As he's got older, he's changed how he feels about it." That's the thing, Ryder, says – for decades, everybody assumed extraterrestrials are the enemy, but it's obvious that they're not. "These guys have got technology that's millions of years in advance of us, and if you think about it, they could have took us out just like that, and they haven't. They're certainly not hostile. We wouldn't be here if they were."

Ryder is far from convinced by everybody he met. Some Ufologists are just chancers out there for the fantasy ride. He knows they've not seen the real thing because they are too glib about it. "They say: 'Yes, I've been abducted, wahey! Wahoo! Some of the people I've met are mad as a box of frogs."

When he was young, did his interest in UFOs make him want to experience more out-of-body experiences through drugs? He answers in a typical round-the-houses Ryder way. "Well, see, here's the weird thing. From being a little kid, I've always been interested in space. Star Trek and Close Encounters – not Star Wars." He spits out "Star Wars" with contempt. "Skies, stars, the moon landing – even as a six-year-old I was glued to that. So I've always been interested in that. And then when I had my first acid trip, did it open my brain even further? Of course it did." Did his fascination with space make him interested in science at school? He laughs. "No, I was a thick kid, I didn't even learn me alphabet til I was 20-odd, I was too busy doing something else. I had a platinum fucking disc before I learned me alphabet. I grew up in the 60s and 70s, where it was still acceptable to say, 'Well, you're not academic, so that's fine, you'll do it some other way.' Nowadays it's like everybody's got to be academic. My kids are – they can spell, they can punctuate. My 11-year-old can spell anything. My lad Oliver is 19 and he's going to do music law."

It's amazing that he was illiterate and is now an author. Ah, Ryder says, well, if he's being strictly honest, the writing's not really down to him, that's his ghostwriter, the journalist Luke Bainbridge. In fact, Ryder says, the first time he looked at the proofs of What Planet Am I On?, the book accompanying the series, he got a bit of a shock, because Bainbridge had captured his voice too accurately. "Here's the thing," he says. "We're doing a book, and the TV show is PG – it can be shown in the day to kids on the History channel. So you want a book to accompany the TV series. So I get a draft of the book and it's, 'fucking this, fucking that, fucking dick, fuckin twat,' and I'm like, 'Luke! You can't!' I'm not very proud of me grammar, of me fucking vocabulary, but with a book here to accompany the TV series, don't be 'Fuck that fuckin' fuckin' fuckin' alien, this fuckin' here, that cunt there'. You know what I mean?" So you had to de-fuck it? He grins. "Aye, I had to de-fuck it." Cool

etc...

Shaun Ryder on UFOs starts on History on Sunday 10 November, 8pm.

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/nov/02/shaun-ryder-ufos-impossible-not-to-believe
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Pietro_Mercurios
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PostPosted: 03-11-2013 11:30    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rynner's post about Shaun Ryder's belief in saucers moved to Celebs and Saucers thread.

Yes it's a documentary, but it's primarily about ageing top pop celeb. Shaun Ryder's belief in flying saucers.

P_M Laughing
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gncxxOffline
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PostPosted: 03-11-2013 17:29    Post subject: Reply with quote

Let's hope Shaun's UFO show is as funny as his Most Haunted excursion. I don't think I get that channel, though.
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MythopoeikaOffline
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PostPosted: 03-11-2013 18:45    Post subject: Reply with quote

gncxx wrote:
Let's hope Shaun's UFO show is as funny as his Most Haunted excursion. I don't think I get that channel, though.


I don't 'get' it either.
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Ronson8Offline
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PostPosted: 03-11-2013 22:07    Post subject: Reply with quote

I do, nah nah.
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