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Growing Old - Death Approaches!
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Are you growing older?
Yes, I am
54%
 54%  [ 72 ]
No, I'm getting younger
18%
 18%  [ 25 ]
Sorry, I don't understand the question
16%
 16%  [ 22 ]
I'm a Mod; I think adding silly polls to chat threads is pointless
9%
 9%  [ 13 ]
Total Votes : 132

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rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 26542
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 07-12-2013 13:02    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner2 wrote:
...the fabric of the left leg just tore in my fingers, along an old crease!
My only other pair of trousers that fit are a similar vintage, so it was on to the internet to buy some new trousers.

I got an email yesterday to say my order had been dispatched, and today a package came through my door. But clearly it wan't big enough to contain 3 pairs of trousers. Then I realised it wasn't even addressed to me, but to a neighbour down the hall!

I popped the package through her door, thinking that I'd have to wait till Monday now for my parcel. But half an hour later, a knock on the door, and it was the parcel delivery I was expecting! Which was nice!

And a nice coincidence to get two parcels in one day (even if one was in error) when I normally average two a year!
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rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 26542
Location: Under the moon
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PostPosted: 29-12-2013 10:52    Post subject: Reply with quote

This could go in other threads too, but growing old is at the heart of it:

Tycoon Robert Wilson gives away $800 million fortune before jumping to death
Jenn Selby Friday 27 December 2013

A renowned Wall Street tycoon gave away his entire $800 million fortune before falling to his death in a suicide jump this week.
Hedge fund multi-millionaire Robert W. Wilson, 87, leapt from the 16th floor of his luxury San Remo apartment building (pictured above), a prestigious address in New York’s Upper East Side which has been the residence of Steven Spielberg, Demi Moore, Glenn Close, Dustin Hoffman, Bono, Steve Martin, Bruce Willis and Steve Jobs in the past.

According to the New York Police Department, he left a note at the scene. He had suffered from a stroke just a few months before.
“He always said he didn’t want to suffer and when the time came, he would be ready,” close friend Stephen Viscusi told the New York Post.
"His plan was to give all his money away. He told me recently, 'I only have about $100 million to go.'"

He has since been praised as a "legend" by his peers, after pledging his entire worth to charity some years before he ended his life.
He gave the last $100 million of his money to not-for-profit environmental advocacy group the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF).

Fred Krupp, the president of the EDF, said of the group’s biggest benefactor: "Robert W. Wilson was a Wall Street legend who became a prominent philanthropist.
"Bob had a passion to get things done in the world. Widely read and blessed with a keen intellect, he had the ability to predict where the world was going, a talent that informed his investments and, in later years, his philanthropy."

Krupp went on to indicate that Wilson was building up a hugely lucrative Wall Street portfolio "with the aim of bestowing his fortune during his lifetime".

"Initially skeptical of the science of climate change, he quickly came to regard it as a critical challenge. He wanted carbon pollution cut in an efficient and sensible way, knowing that for a solution to be environmentally sustainable, it must also be economically sustainable."

"Bob helped EDF grow with a pivotal $100 million challenge grant that inspired scores of others to increase their own giving," Krupp continued. "I am personally grateful to Bob for his leadership and support over many years."

Other beneficiaries of Wilson’s money include the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, the World Monuments Fund, the Nature Conservancy and the Wildlife Conservation Society, each of which received $100 million before Wilson passed away.
"I realised that Catholic schools were closing all over the country, and Bill Gates probably didn’t have enough money to save them," Wilson told Bloomberg News in 2010 when asked about his decision to donate such a large sum to the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York.

Wilson was married to his only wife Marilyn for 35 years before they divorced. He is survived by his brother William, 88. He had no children.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/news/tycoon-robert-wilson-gives-away-800million-fortune-before-plunging-to-death-in-suicide-9027278.html

RIP
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MythopoeikaOffline
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PostPosted: 29-12-2013 10:59    Post subject: Reply with quote

What a guy!
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skinnyOffline
Roaring Fortean
Joined: 30 May 2010
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Location: Adelaide
Age: 43
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PostPosted: 29-12-2013 11:06    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dun Punkin ~ Episode 1: Boys Will Be Boys

Set in a 'Retirement Home' amd featuring the Blockheads (a 70s rock band fronted by diamond geezer Ian Dury).

edit: my mistake, not Davey Payne in this video - possibly Derek Hussey.

The music is fantastic.


Enjoy. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PYX5UERTKoQ&feature=youtu.be


Last edited by skinny on 29-12-2013 11:21; edited 2 times in total
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chris138Offline
Cretin
Joined: 12 Sep 2013
Total posts: 155
Location: County Antrim
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PostPosted: 29-12-2013 11:08    Post subject: Reply with quote

Over the last few months I have started to notice a decline in my hair-line on one side only at the front. No-one else notices, but no doubt they will soon.

This is the most horrible thing ever. I don't know the reasons for this but why does mother nature do this? I live in N. Ireland and need my hair, it's bloody cold!
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MythopoeikaOffline
Joined: 18 Sep 2001
Total posts: 9785
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PostPosted: 29-12-2013 11:41    Post subject: Reply with quote

chris138 wrote:
Over the last few months I have started to notice a decline in my hair-line on one side only at the front. No-one else notices, but no doubt they will soon.

This is the most horrible thing ever. I don't know the reasons for this but why does mother nature do this? I live in N. Ireland and need my hair, it's bloody cold!


Get a prescription for Propecia (finasteride).
There is a downside to using it though, so check it out before asking the doc...
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Pietro_Mercurios
Heuristically Challenged
Gender: Unknown
PostPosted: 29-12-2013 11:42    Post subject: Reply with quote

chris138 wrote:
Over the last few months I have started to notice a decline in my hair-line on one side only at the front. No-one else notices, but no doubt they will soon.

This is the most horrible thing ever. I don't know the reasons for this but why does mother nature do this? I live in N. Ireland and need my hair, it's bloody cold!

Mostly, hair-loss is triggered by high levels of testosterone. This is not necessarily a bad thing. There are treatments.

Here's a nice article that might cheer you up.

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20121210-are-bald-men-more-virile

Of course, if I've totally misread the situation and you are actually female, then scrap all that.

Here's a nice article which explains the problem of female hair-loss a bit more fully.

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2012/feb/06/female-hair-loss-causes-treatment

Hope that helps.
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CarlosTheDJOffline
Dazed and confused for so long its not true
Joined: 01 Feb 2007
Total posts: 2006
Location: Sussex
Age: 38
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 29-12-2013 11:50    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don't worry about it, mine started to recede at 19 so I whipped it all off and never looked back.

I'm just growing a massive beard to compensate Wink
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chris138Offline
Cretin
Joined: 12 Sep 2013
Total posts: 155
Location: County Antrim
Gender: Unknown
PostPosted: 29-12-2013 11:50    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes,it helps. I couldn't get the first link to work but I think this is the same article.

http://www.oroom.org/forum/showthread.php?46890-Are-bald-men-more-virile
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ramonmercadoOffline
Psycho Punk
Joined: 19 Aug 2003
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Location: Dublin
Age: 0
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PostPosted: 05-01-2014 14:15    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm sure North Korea will offer cheaper rates.

Quote:
Exporting Grandma to care homes abroad
By Anna Lacey and Imogen Foulkes
BBC Health Check
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-25438325

Is it wrong to send the elderly abroad?

Sending elderly relatives to a care home can be a tough and emotional decision. But is booking a one-way flight to a destination 8,000 miles away a step too far?

Sybille Wiedmer lives in Zurich and is packing her suitcase for a trip to Thailand.

But this is no ordinary holiday.

She is off to visit her mother who lives in a care home in the Thai city of Chiang Mai.

"A lot of people were shocked in the beginning and said, 'How can you do this? How dare you do this? You can't visit her,'" says Wiedmer.

"And I said if I visited her here, half an hour later she didn't know any more. She had forgotten."

Sybille's mother Elisabeth is 91 and has dementia.

She has been living in a care home in Thailand with a dozen other Swiss and German residents for the past four years but struggles to remember anything from the present.

Continue reading the main story
Lost in space?

Husband with Alzheimer's
The word 'dementia' covers a wide range of illnesses - the most common being Alzheimer's and vascular dementia.
It's often assumed that people with dementia don't know where they are - but dementia affects every person differently.
Although dementia progresses differently from person to person, it is often factual memories rather than emotional ones which are lost first.
This means that although people might not remember the precise facts of where they are or who has come to visit, they are more likely to remember the emotional feelings that come with those visits or locations.
There is evidence that for some people with dementia, visiting familiar places and talking about the past can be very beneficial.
Source: Alzheimer's Society

"I'm not long here up to now. But it is very nice and they are very kind. How long do I stay here?" she asks.

Elisabeth is told she's been a resident for four years.

"I'm here how long already? Four and a half years? Oh! I grow old."

Care in crisis
A quick look at the figures and it's easy to see why some families are starting to look for care further afield.

The staff costs for nursing are significantly lower in Thailand, but the reputation for quality is still very high.

In Elisabeth's case, her family chose Thailand partly because she had spent time living in Asia with her late husband - so it wasn't completely unfamiliar.

But Sybille says a key factor was the type of care her mother would receive.

"The treatment is so much more individual, and, how shall I say, with love. So I wouldn't hesitate to put anyone like that there," she says.

Sending relatives to care homes abroad might be a choice that many more Europeans find themselves considering, as the gulf between cost and quality continues to widen.

The problem is partly fuelled by demand. People are simply living longer and to ages where chronic health problems are more likely.

The World Health Organization states that by 2050, the number of people who make it past their 80th birthday is expected to almost quadruple to 395 million - the age after which one in six people are estimated to have developed dementia.

Add this to the findings of a report by the Alzheimer's Society showing that around 80% of current care home residents have dementia or significant memory problems, and it's clear that the need for care is only going to increase.

Continue reading the main story

Start Quote

The treatment is so much more individual and, how shall I say, with love.”

Sybille Wiedmer
Daughter of parent in Thai care home
But with people tightening their belts like never before, paying the bills for a good residential home is out of the question for many.

In Switzerland, people are expected to contribute to costs amounting to anything between US$5,000 (£3,036) and $10,000 (£6,073) a month, In Thailand the figure is closer to US$3,000 (£1,821) a month - and that for a care package that is likely to be more comprehensive.

In the UK average costs range from US$3,600 (£2,186) for basic residential care to over US$5,000 (£3,036) a month with nursing care.

And while life savings are depleted, the UK care system has been beset by shocking revelations about abuse of the elderly and people being left to die of hunger and thirst.

"There's often a strong aversion to having family members go into care," says Chris Quince, a senior policy advisor at the Alzheimer's Society.

"Our research has found that abuse is the biggest fear among the public."

A matter of culture
In contrast, Thailand has a strong culture of looking after its elderly.

Martin Woodtli, the Swiss director of a Chang Mai care home, says his residents enjoy a quality of care and value for money that is missing back home.

"You can have three or four caretakers for one person and you can organise that this is possible 24 hours. This wouldn't be possible in Europe," he says.

Even so, Thai caregiver La, who lovingly looks after Elisabeth day after day, doesn't see the home as a solution for her own family.

"I think we don't need to come here. If we have to come, then I think we have a problem with a daughter," says La.

"If you have a daughter then you don't have to come here because your daughter can take care of you at home, we can take care together, living together."

A moral dilemma
Sybille Wiedmer did try caring for her mother herself but, like many relatives of people with dementia, it eventually became impossible.

"Most of the time I looked after her every day," she says.

"But if you're so close to somebody... she got very aggressive. That made the situation very very heavy, very bad."

Although many relatives experience immense guilt for going down the care home route, Chris Quince of the Alzheimer's Society says that decisions about care are often out of their hands.

"Many people would like to continue caring at home but really can't," he told the BBC. "That choice to go to a home is often not really a choice, but happens because people can't cope in the community or have an accident or illness."

Despite the distance, Sybille speaks to Elisabeth via Skype almost every day and visits Thailand at least twice a year.

However, Markus Leser of the Association of Care Homes for the Elderly in Switzerland is not convinced that sending relatives to foreign climes is the right way to go.

"The step from their own house into a nursing home is a big step. And the step going to Thailand is much much bigger because there is the language, you are separated probably from your family," he says.

"Of course it's cheaper if you go to Thailand. But the decision for my father or my mother, it shouldn't only be the costs in my focus."

Even so, as a generation of 40- and 50-year-olds find themselves living through a financial crisis while simultaneously supporting both their children and elderly parents, it may mean that many more people like Elisabeth are being cared for a very long way from home.
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MythopoeikaOffline
Joined: 18 Sep 2001
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PostPosted: 05-01-2014 17:16    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't agree with doing this to old people, it's just callous and all about money.

Mind you, there is a good (and similar) financial case to be made for doing something like this with long-term prisoners and long-term unemployed people - i.e. outsource to a cheaper country.
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rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 26542
Location: Under the moon
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PostPosted: 16-01-2014 08:22    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
The mystery of why so many birds fly in a V formation may have been solved.

Scientists from the Royal Veterinary College fitted data loggers to a flock of rare birds that were being trained to migrate by following a microlight.
This revealed that the birds flew in the optimal position - gaining lift from the bird in front by remaining close to its wingtip.
The study, published in the journal Nature, also showed that the birds timed their wing beats.

A previous experiment in pelicans was the first real clue to the energy-saving purpose of V formations. It revealed that birds' heart rates went down when they were flying together in V.

But this latest study tracked and monitored the flight of every bird in the flock - recording its position, speed and heading as well as every wing flap.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-25736049

I'm disturbed by this story. The idea that birds save energy flying in a V formation has been known for years, hasn't it? It's one of those things I've always taken for granted.

And yet now it's being presented as a new discovery. Shocked Maybe it is a new discovery to those billions of young people born on this planet after me, but to me this is something I've always known. It would be interesting to ask the well-known geriatric naturalist David Attenborough about it!

The alternative is that my life has jumped timelines somewhere along the way. In my original timeline, it was well-known why birds fly in V-formation. But now, in the new timeline, it's only just been discovered... Confused

Or else I'm going ga-ga, and my mind is confusing things, and making stuff up... Sad

Discuss!
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Ronson8Offline
Things can only get better.
Joined: 31 Jul 2001
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PostPosted: 16-01-2014 09:24    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, I had the same thoughts, not only has this been known for many years, it just takes common sense to understand why they do it.
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CarlosTheDJOffline
Dazed and confused for so long its not true
Joined: 01 Feb 2007
Total posts: 2006
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PostPosted: 16-01-2014 11:55    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah me too!

I thought it was common sense - slipstreaming works with cars, runners, boats......
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EnolaGaiaOnline
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Location: USA
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PostPosted: 16-01-2014 12:36    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner2 wrote:
I'm disturbed by this story. The idea that birds save energy flying in a V formation has been known for years, hasn't it? It's one of those things I've always taken for granted.

And yet now it's being presented as a new discovery. Shocked ...

The alternative is that my life has jumped timelines somewhere along the way. In my original timeline, it was well-known why birds fly in V-formation. But now, in the new timeline, it's only just been discovered... Confused

Or else I'm going ga-ga, and my mind is confusing things, and making stuff up... Sad

Discuss!


The _theory_ that flying in a V formation has energetic benefits dates back a long time. For example, this 2004 _Scientific American_ posting:

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=why-do-migratory-birds-fl

... clearly shows the theory was widely recognized a decade ago.

The study currently being touted seems to have finally provided in-flight data validating the long-held theory.
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