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Growing Old - Death Approaches!
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Are you growing older?
Yes, I am
55%
 55%  [ 72 ]
No, I'm getting younger
18%
 18%  [ 24 ]
Sorry, I don't understand the question
16%
 16%  [ 21 ]
I'm a Mod; I think adding silly polls to chat threads is pointless
10%
 10%  [ 13 ]
Total Votes : 130

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Anome_Offline
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PostPosted: 17-01-2014 07:54    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's all about the difference between theory and practice. In theory, there isn't one...

It does seem that we finally have some conclusive experimental data, where previously we only had calculations and models. This has now been filtered through the press who really don't know what they're on about, and comes out as new discovery, instead of proof of a theory.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 19-01-2014 21:36    Post subject: Reply with quote

A humourous look at growing old - technology, relationships, even a hint of s*x.

Ayres on the Air - Series 5 - 1. Home

Pam Ayres regales her Radio 4 audience with poems, stories and sketches, this week on the subject of Home.

She is joined on stage by Felicity Montagu and Geoffrey Whitehead, with Geoffrey playing her long-suffering husband 'Gordon'.

This week Pam talks about her first home, about the impact of her grown up sons leaving home and about the unwelcome prospect of downsizing. There are also looks at how making your home more 'vintage' can go too far, some handy hints on how to make your child feel more at home if they have to return to the nest post-university, and how your homelife changes when both partners have retired. We are also treated to some wry observations on how our homes have now become so hi-tech we can barely change channels on the TV, and how to approach the thorny issue of moving into single beds when your partner's snoring becomes too much to bear.

Poems include: A September Song, My Little Grandson & Pollen on the Wind

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b03pmk77/Ayres_on_the_Air_Series_5_Home/

Available until 12:02PM Fri, 24 Jan 2014

(I could relate to all of it, even though I haven't actually experienced all of it....)
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escargot1Offline
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PostPosted: 19-01-2014 22:52    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh God, not Pam Ayres. Rolling Eyes
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 19-01-2014 22:57    Post subject: Reply with quote

escargot1 wrote:
Oh God, not Pam Ayres. Rolling Eyes

I love her!

In fact, she reminds me of you! Wink
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Pietro_Mercurios
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PostPosted: 19-01-2014 23:17    Post subject: Reply with quote

Scarg is funnier. Smile
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Ronson8Offline
Things can only get better.
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PostPosted: 19-01-2014 23:23    Post subject: Reply with quote

escargot1 wrote:
Oh God, not Pam Ayres. Rolling Eyes

Don’t lay me in some gloomy churchyard shaded by a wall
Where the dust of ancient bones has spread a dryness over all,
Lay me in some leafy loam where, sheltered from the cold
Little seeds investigate and tender leaves unfold.
There kindly and affectionately, plant a native tree
To grow resplendent before God and hold some part of me.
The roots will not disturb me as they wend their peaceful way
To build the fine and bountiful, from closure and decay.
To seek their small requirements so that when their work is done
I’ll be tall and standing strongly in the beauty of the sun.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 21-01-2014 10:07    Post subject: Reply with quote

Brains of elderly slow because they know so much
The brains of older people only appear to slow down because they have so much information to compute, much like a full-up hard drive, scientists believe.
By Sarah Knapton, Science Correspondent
5:16PM GMT 20 Jan 2014

Older people do not decline mentally with age, it just takes them longer to recall facts because they have more information in their brains, scientists believe.
Much like a computer struggles as the hard drive gets full up, so to do humans take longer to access information, it has been suggested.

Researchers say this slowing down it is not the same as cognitive decline.
"The human brain works slower in old age,” said Dr. Michael Ramscar, “but only because we have stored more information over time
“The brains of older people do not get weak. On the contrary, they simply know more.”

A team at Tübingen University in Germany programmed a computer to read a certain amount each day and learn new words and commands.
When the researchers let a computer “read” only so much, its performance on cognitive tests resembled that of a young adult.

But if the same computer was exposed to the experiences we might encounter over a lifetime – with reading simulated over decades – its performance now looked like that of an older adult.

Often it was slower, but not because its processing capacity had declined. Rather, increased “experience” had caused the computer’s database to grow, giving it more data to process – which takes time.

“Imagine someone who knows two people’s birthdays and can recall them almost perfectly.
“Would you really want to say that person has a better memory than a person who knows the birthdays of 2000 people, but can ‘only’ match the right person to the right birthday nine times out of ten?” said Dr Ramscar.

The study provides more than an explanation of why, in the light of all the extra information they have to process, we might expect older brains to seem slower and more forgetful than younger brains.

And researchers say some cognitive tests which are used to study mental capacity may inadvertently favour young people.
A cognitive test called ‘paired associated learning’ invites people to remember a pair of words that are unrelated like ‘necktie’ and ‘cracker.’

Studies have shown that young people are better at this test, but scientists think that older people struggle to remember nonsense pairs – like ‘necktie’ and ‘cracker’ – because they have learned that they never go together.
Prof. Harald Baayen, who heads the Alexander von Humboldt Quantitative Linguistics research group where the work was carried out said: “The fact that older adults find nonsense pairs harder to learn than young adults simply demonstrates older adults’ much better understanding of language.
“They have to make more of an effort to learn unrelated word pairs because, unlike the youngsters, they know a lot about which words don’t belong together.”

Scientists say this could explain why older people struggle to remember unusual first names.
The study was published in the Journal of Topics in Cognitive Science

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/science-news/10584927/Brains-of-elderly-slow-because-they-know-so-much.html

Hah! That explains it! Now what I need is a - er - thingummy - what's it called... a bran tub - no, not a bran tub, a brain... what's the word? It'll come to me in a minute... bear with... a brain extension with a few more - territories? troubles? No, terabytes, make it easier to shuffle all this stuff round...

Er, where was I?
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JamesWhiteheadOffline
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PostPosted: 21-01-2014 20:46    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Mummy, why has Grannie put custard in her handbag?"
"Hush. She is just struggling to remember they are a nonsense pair! Try her on your Physics Homework."  Shocked
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MythopoeikaOffline
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PostPosted: 21-01-2014 21:14    Post subject: Reply with quote

Computers behave in similar fashion. The older a computer gets, the more fragmented files accumulate and more cruft builds up - slowing it down.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 21-01-2014 21:26    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mythopoeika wrote:
Computers behave in similar fashion. The older a computer gets, the more fragmented files accumulate and more cruft builds up - slowing it down.

Well, defrag it then! Any fule kno that!

I do it every month - the computer, that is. Don't know how to defrag my brain, unless it's going on a bender!
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MythopoeikaOffline
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PostPosted: 21-01-2014 22:05    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner2 wrote:
Mythopoeika wrote:
Computers behave in similar fashion. The older a computer gets, the more fragmented files accumulate and more cruft builds up - slowing it down.

Well, defrag it then! Any fule kno that!

I do it every month - the computer, that is. Don't know how to defrag my brain, unless it's going on a bender!


I defrag the computer regularly. As for my brain, I deliberately try not to remember stuff I'm not interested in. It means I have a bad memory, but I can think fairly fast. Smile
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 24-01-2014 08:40    Post subject: Reply with quote

Older cancer patients in UK 'written off', charity warns

Some cancer patients are being "written off" as too old for treatment, a charity has warned.
Macmillan Cancer Support said too many patients were assessed just by their age and not their overall fitness.
It comes as research looking at data from 1991-2010 suggests some 130,000 people diagnosed with cancer after age 65 survived for more than 10 years.
NHS England acknowledged that it needed to deliver better services to people in the over-65 age group.

Macmillan Cancer Support conducted the research alongside the National Cancer Intelligence Network, found of the 130,000 who had lived with the disease for more than a decade, 8,000 had been diagnosed over the age of 80.
Despite that, many patients in the UK are being denied treatment because they are deemed too old, Macmillan said, adding that cancer survival rates in the age group are "poor".

For many common cancers - including prostate, breast, lung, stomach, ovary and kidney cancers - the UK and Ireland have a lower five-year survival rate than the rest of Europe, a spokesman said.

"It's wrong to write off older people as too old for treatment," said Macmillan Cancer Support's chief executive Ciaran Devane.
"With a proper assessment and appropriate treatment, our research shows that many older cancer patients can live for a long time and can even be cured.
"While it's good news that so many older people are benefiting from treatment, many thousands more could live longer if our survival rates for over-65s matched those in comparable countries."
He said barriers to treatment, which include "age discrimination and inadequate assessment methods", must be addressed.

NHS England's national clinical director for cancer, Sean Duffy, said that with an ageing population, the study had come at an important moment in time.
But he added: "We need to deliver better services for people over 65 and 75 because we know there's an issue and interventions need to be designed to that end."
He said treatment for cancer can be complex "and should be based on what is right for each individual patient."

Dr Mark Porter of the British Medical Association said it should be a "key part" of the medical profession to ensure older patients are "treated with the care and respect they deserve".

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-25873930
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 28-01-2014 11:04    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great-grandmother, 76, shoplifted because she was 'bored of being old'
A probation officer said the old lady had as many shoplifting convictions as a teenage heroin addict Shocked
By News agencies
8:47AM GMT 28 Jan 2014

A great-grandmother suffering from arthritis embarked on a four year shoplifting spree because she was ''bored'' of being old.
June Humphreys, 76, used her bus pass to travel to town centres before hiding consumer commodities in her shopping trolley then sneaking out of stores without paying.

The OAP from Crewe, Cheshire was being treated for breast cancer and osteoarthritis but would strike at high streets across two counties.
Store detectives would catch her red handed, however she went back out shoplifting again.
The mother-of-seven later claimed she only carried out the thefts to relieve her boredom as she was fed up of living on her own.

Details of the offending OAP emerged at North Staffordshire Magistrates' Court where Humphreys was warned she will go to jail if she shoplifts again.
Probation officer Darren Vernon told the hearing: "She has travelled around Staffordshire and Cheshire on public transport and committed offences.
"She knows what she is doing is wrong, she says she is bored and needs to fill her time.
"The main reason for her doing this is boredom. She lives alone. She has seven children but the only one she has contact with lives above her.
"She has acquired the record of a heroin addict in his late teens."

Earlier the court heard Humphreys' offending took her to high streets in Stoke, Leek, Macclesfield, Stafford and Whitchurch and had convictions for shop theft in 2011, 2012 and 2013 and on January 14 this year.

In the latest bout of thefts, she pleaded guilty to stealing confectionery worth £2 from Iceland, theft of baby clothes worth £69 from BHS, stealing baby clothes worth £24.98 from B & M, and theft of a breast pump from Boots, all on January 6.

The pensioner also admitted stealing alcohol, coffee and confectionery worth £30.42 from an Aldi store and stealing two pairs of boots worth £94.50 from a shoe shop in Hanley, Staffs , a week before Christmas.

She was sentenced to one-month in prison suspended for 12 months, ordered to pay £45 costs and an £80 victim surcharge. Magistrates revoked a community order which had previously been imposed on her for theft.
Her lawyer Andrew Bennett said: "My client does not want to go to prison. She wants to stop doing this. She wants to stop stealing from shops."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/law-and-order/10601150/Great-grandmother-76-shoplifted-because-she-was-bored-of-being-old.html

Another OAP muses: "Food for thought there!"
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Ronson8Offline
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PostPosted: 28-01-2014 12:04    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
theft of a breast pump from Boots, all on January 6.
Smile
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KondoruOffline
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PostPosted: 28-01-2014 21:09    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, truly disturbing
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