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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 03-05-2006 13:53    Post subject: Acupuncture Reply with quote

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Friday, April 28, 2006

Neuro Clues to the Mysteries of Acupuncture

Advanced imaging methods may reveal how this ancient healing technique affects the brain.

By Emily Singer

Some people think of acupuncture as a wacky Eastern medicine, without any basis in science, while others consider it to be a crucial alternative to pain-relief medicine. Whatever the perspective, acupuncture use in the United States is on the rise, and the medical establishment has been taking notice. Now scientists are using advanced brain-imaging techniques to study the ancient practice -- and have begun to uncover some tantalizing clues about how it works.


Acupuncture is the 2,000-year-old practice of sticking extremely thin needles into the skin at specific points on the body, to try to control a range of symptoms, including pain, allergies, and infertility. While its effectiveness is still under debate, some large-scale clinical trials suggest that the technique can effectively relieve pain.


Two large controlled trials of acupuncture for osteoarthritis pain, published in 2004 and 2005, found that the practice is more effective than a sham treatment. Another study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2005, found acupuncture to be effective for migraines; however, patients experienced the same level of pain relief regardless of whether needles were placed in traditional acupuncture points or other spots.


"Acupuncture has been shown to have some therapeutic effect, but we have an incomplete understanding of the basic science that supports it," says Bruce Rosen, director of the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, within the Harvard-MIT division of Health Sciences and Technology. Rosen and colleagues are part of a small number of scientists using brain-imaging techniques to understand what acupuncture does to the brain, as well as which characteristics, such as needle placement, are important for beneficial effects.


Rosen's team at the Martinos Center is funded in part by a $5.9 million grant to study the neurological basis of acupuncture from the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), a division of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD, whose mission is to rigorously test commonly used alternative therapies.


The team has shown that acupuncture affects regions of the brain involved with sensory processing, as well as with cognitive and emotional processing. For example, Kathleen Hui, an instructor at Harvard Medical School and a member of the Martinos team, has shown that acupuncture induces a characteristic activity pattern in the brain. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, which measures brain activation, scientists found that parts of the limbic system, a brain area involved in emotion, motivation, and memory, and parts of the cortex, involved in cognitive processing, seem to quiet down during acupuncture. These areas become active when a person is focused on performing a task, suggesting that acupuncture might affect some homeostatic mechanism involved in the brain's resting state, says Rosen.



The Martinos researchers have also shown that acupuncture elicits the same characteristic pattern of brain activity, regardless of the type of acupuncture or placement of the needle, a finding that supports results from some clinical trials.


The team is now beginning to study the longer-term effects of acupuncture. Patients with carpal tunnel syndrome, a condition of pain or numbing in the wrist caused by a compressed nerve, show characteristic brain activity patterns in their somatosensory cortex, the brain area that processes sensory information. A pilot study by Vitaly Napadow, also at the Martinos Center, has found that after several weeks of acupuncture treatment, these patients' symptoms improve and their brain activation patterns begin to look more like normal subjects. "It's as if the [brain] changes that occur during carpal tunnel were somehow ameliorated during acupuncture," says Rosen.


Designing well-controlled trials is one of the biggest challenges in studying acupuncture. "With mood and pain, there are big placebo effects," says Chris Evans, a neurobiologist and pain expert at the University of California, Los Angeles. "To differentiate the placebo effect from the actual potential effects of acupuncture is an important goal to which imaging can probably add a lot."


However, scientists first need to figure out the best placebo treatments. With drug trials, doctors can simply give some patients a fake pill. "Because we don't know how acupuncture works, we can't develop an adequate sham," says Richard Hammershlag, a neurobiologist who began focusing on acupuncture several years ago, and is now research director at the Oregon College of Oriental Medicine in Portland.


Scientists sometimes use acupuncture needles placed outside of traditional acupuncture points -- but, according to Rosen's studies, that practice may resemble an active treatment more than a control. Another option is sham needles, which look like they are being inserted into the skin but don't actually penetrate. Rosen and his team hope their studies will eventually help to design optimal clinical trials.


"Only then," says Richard Nahin, NCCAM's senior advisor for scientific coordination and outreach, "can the scientific community provide definitive information to the public and health-care providers [on the effects of acupuncture]."


www.technologyreview.com/read_article.aspx?id=16751&ch=biotech


Edit to amend title.


Last edited by ramonmercado on 15-05-2009 13:23; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: 05-05-2006 11:01    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting. I've read a bit about pain suppression trials in psych textbooks (e.g. Carlson). Acupuncture, hypnosis and distraction techniques are often compared; but to my knowledge never all three together. I look forward to hearing about any neural correlates (a big area of interest for me).
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PostPosted: 25-09-2007 06:36    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sticking needles in a bad back ‘eases pain better than drugs’
Nigel Hawkes, Health Editor

Acupuncture works better than conventional treatments in reducing lower back pain, according to researchers in Germany.

But so does fake acupuncture, where the needles are inserted shallowly and in the wrong places. In a trial of more than 1,100 people, both were almost twice as effective as a combination of drugs, physiotherapy and exercise.

The results suggest that both acupuncture and sham acupuncture act as powerful versions of the placebo effect, providing relief from symptoms as a result of the convictions that they engender in patients.

A team led by Michael Haake, of the University of Regensburg, recruited 1,162 patients aged between 18 and 86 who had suffered lower back pain for an average of eight years. They were divided into three equal groups, and treated either with genuine acupuncture, with the needles inserted in precisely specified places and to a predetermined depth, with fake acupuncture, or with antiinflammatory drugs, painkillers and physiotherapy.

Success was measured as a one-third improvement in pain, or a 12 per cent improvement in mobility.

After six months, almost half of those on true acupuncture (47.6 per cent) and 44.2 per cent of those on sham acupuncture had met these criteria, while only 27.4 per cent of those treated conventionally had. This suggests, say the authors in Archives of Internal Medicine, that acupuncture, however incompetently it may be applied, is about twice as effective as conventional therapy.

“The superiority of both forms of acupuncture suggests a common underlying mechanism that may act on pain generation, transmission of pain signals or processing of pain signals by the central nervous system and that is stronger than the action mechanism of conventional therapy,” the authors say.

“Acupuncture gives physicians a promising and effective treatment option for those experiencing chronic low back pain, with few adverse effects or contraindications. The improvements in all primary and secondary outcome measures were significant and lasted long after completion of treatment.”

They say that this is the largest and most rigorous trial to investigate the benefits of acupuncture, the technique in which sharp needles are introduced to a considerable depth into the body in precisely defined places in the body.

Its results, they acknowledge, are surprising. That random pricking of the skin to a depth of one to three millimetres works almost as well as “true” acupuncture, which involves penetrations to a depth of five to forty millimetres in precise places, leads them to question the underlying mechanism.

It also suggests that lengthy training in the technique may be superfluous. All that is needed is to declare that you are a practising acupuncturist and make a few shallow insertions, the trial suggests.

The trial aimed to distinguish between the physical and the psychological effects of the technique. If true acupuncture worked better than sham, it would have shown that it has a genuine basis in physiology. But the trial failed to find any differences at all. So the authors conclude that the results send a confused message. One possibility is that there are no physical effects at all of acupuncture, or that they are are so small that they are overlaid by far stronger psychological effects.

Alternatively, acupuncture does work, but it does not matter how well or badly it is done. Symptoms improve regardless of point selection or depth of needling.

Since all the participants had long-term back pain, it is reasonable to assume that all had experienced conventional treatment, which often fails. Low back pain is notoriously hard to treat, so the use of acupuncture would have been novel, and likely to bring the placebo effect into play.

That fake acupuncture appeared to have worked almost as well as true acupuncture supports this conclusion.

Straight to the point

–– In Oriental medicine, illness is said to be due to an imbalance of “vital energy” (Ch’i) which flows through the body along 12 pathways or meridians, each corresponding to one of the vital organs

–– The acupuncturist inserts very fine stainless steel needles at specific points to stimulate energy flow; patients report a tingling sensation

–– Trials have shown benefits in treating pain, nausea and headaches

–– There appears to be no scientific basis for the medical concept or placement of needles

–– It has been used in China since 3000 BC, with stone needles found in Mongolia

–– The Cochrane Collaboration, the most authoritative review of evidence, says that it is effective for low-back pain but no better than conventional treatment

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/health/article2525544.ece

Note to MODS: another short Acupuncture thread here -
http://www.forteantimes.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=19521
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SameOldVardoger
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PostPosted: 14-10-2007 22:34    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can imagine it help prevent you from thinking about your original pain and instead think about the pain caused by the accupuncture. Twisted Evil
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decipheringscarsOffline
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PostPosted: 31-10-2007 22:44    Post subject: Reply with quote

Or maybe it reboots you like sticking a paperclip end in my old iMac used to do.
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EvilPumpkinOffline
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PostPosted: 01-11-2007 14:25    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Or maybe it reboots you like sticking a paperclip end in my old iMac used to do.


You may well jest!! I have been having acupuncture for five years now, and I can honestly say that it has been a miracle.

Going back to the above quote, one of my acupuncturist's patients from many years ago had been suffering severe leg pains for a couple of years after an abdominal operation, which in Chinese terms had cut through the meridians. The acupuncturist inserted needles into the scar from the op and literally "re wired" the patient's Qi. The patient said that they experienced a weird electrical buzz, like a static shock and has never had a problem in the legs since.
I can only presume from that, that it is exactly like sticking a paperclip into an iMac!!! Very Happy
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 13-05-2009 14:38    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some more stories about Acupuncture.

Quote:
SPINE Trial Shows That Acupuncture Eases Chronic Low Back Pain

Acupuncture can help people with chronic low back pain feel less bothered by their symptoms and function better in their daily activities, according to the largest randomized trial of its kind, published in the May 11, 2009 Archives of Internal Medicine. But the SPINE (Stimulating Points to Investigate Needling Efficacy) trial raises questions about how the ancient practice actually works.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/149708.php


Quote:
Real And Simulated Acupuncture Appear More Effective Than Usual Care For Back Pain

Three types of acupuncture therapy-an individually tailored program, standard therapy and a simulation involving toothpicks at key acupuncture points-appear more effective than usual care for chronic low back pain, according to a report in the May 11 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/149689.php
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PostPosted: 13-05-2009 17:16    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've recently been having acupuncture for trapped nerves in my back causing severe neuralgia in my shoulder & arm.

My Physio, Ken, uses it in conjunction with traditional run of the mill physio techniques and I have to say, i've found it nothing short of a miracle.
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 05-02-2010 19:27    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Study Maps Effects of Acupuncture on the Brain
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100204101736.htm

When a patient receives acupuncture treatment, a sensation called deqi can be obtained; scientific analysis shows that this deactivates areas within the brain that are associated with the processing of pain. (Credit: iStockphoto)

ScienceDaily (Feb. 5, 2010) — Important new research about the effects of acupuncture on the brain may provide an understanding of the complex mechanisms of acupuncture and could lead to a wider acceptability of the treatment.

The study, by researchers at the University of York and the Hull York Medical School published in Brain Research, indicates that acupuncture has a significant effect on specific neural structures. When a patient receives acupuncture treatment, a sensation called deqi can be obtained; scientific analysis shows that this deactivates areas within the brain that are associated with the processing of pain.

Dr Hugh MacPherson, of the Complementary Medicine Research Group in the University's Department of Health Sciences, says: "These results provide objective scientific evidence that acupuncture has specific effects within the brain which hopefully will lead to a better understanding of how acupuncture works."

Neuroscientist Dr Aziz Asghar, of the York Neuroimaging Centre and the Hull York Medical School, adds: "The results are fascinating. Whether such brain deactivations constitute a mechanism which underlies or contributes to the therapeutic effect of acupuncture is an intriguing possibility which requires further research."

Last summer, following research conducted in York, acupuncture was recommended for the first time by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) as a treatment option for NHS patients with lower back pain. NICE guidelines now state that GPs should 'consider offering a course of acupuncture comprising a maximum of 10 sessions over a period of up to 12 weeks' for patients with this common condition.

Current clinical trials at the University of York are investigating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of acupuncture for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and for depression. Recent studies in the US have also shown that acupuncture can be an effective treatment for migraines and osteoarthritis of the knee.

The York team believe that the new research could help to clear the way for acupuncture to be more broadly accepted as a treatment option on the NHS for a number of medical conditions.


Story Source:

Adapted from materials provided by University of York.
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PostPosted: 06-02-2010 06:47    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't understand all the fuss about whether acupuncture ,or biofeedback, hypnosis, iridology or whatever it's called, homeopathy, etc., is 'fake' or not. (And I'm not talking about validating sleazoids who sell miracle cures to desperate people, by the way.) If the results aren't fake (i.e., relief from pain), how can it be a problem? If Blinko Glick got results (congratulations by the way), I say it's not fake.

I mean, I once bought a knockoff designer watch; when I took it to the jeweller for a new battery a year later he sniffily told me it was a 'fake watch'. I just as sniffily told him if it told the time it was a real watch.

Maybe mainstream doctors are the sniffy jewellers of this world.
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PostPosted: 23-02-2010 17:38    Post subject: Reply with quote

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During Pregnancy Acupuncture Found To Lessen Depression Symptoms, Stanford Study Shows
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/180057.php
23 Feb 2010

Acupuncture appears to be an effective way to reduce depression symptoms during pregnancy, according to a first-of-its-kind study from Stanford University School of Medicine researchers.

The study authors, led by Rachel Manber, PhD, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, said they hope the results will raise awareness of the problem of depression during pregnancy and provide patients and physicians an alternative to antidepressants. "This standardized acupuncture protocol could be a viable treatment option for depression during pregnancy," they wrote in a paper that will appear in the March issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Up to 14 percent of pregnant women may have major depressive disorder, a condition characterized by feelings of dread, gloom and hopelessness, and a loss of interest in normally pleasurable activities. Some women suffer from depression before becoming pregnant, stop taking their medication and then experience a relapse; in other women, pregnancy itself may cause depression.

Clinicians aren't exactly sure how pregnancy leads to the disorder, but an influx of hormones could be the culprit. Some women might also feel overwhelmed by the major changes in their life, which could trigger depression. "Pregnancy just by its nature can bring out some underlying psychiatric and emotional issues," said co-author Deirdre Lyell, MD, assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology.

Depression, if left untreated, can pose risks to both mother and baby. The mom-to-be could stop taking care of herself or her fetus, and might even engage in self-destructive behavior. Studies have also linked depression during pregnancy to poor birth outcomes and postpartum depression. "Treatment of depression during pregnancy is critically important so that a woman can maintain her sense of well-being and take good care of herself, her fetus and, someday, her child," said Lyell.

The use of antidepressants during pregnancy doubled between 1999 and 2003, according to a 2007 American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology study, but many women avoid taking medication because of safety concerns. In fact, Manber said, 94 percent of the depressed women involved in her study expressed reluctance to take antidepressants.

"Because there's this concern about medication among pregnant women and their physicians, it's important to find an alternative," said Manber.

For this study, the researchers recruited 150 women whose pregnancies were between 12 and 30 weeks gestation and who met the criteria for major depressive disorder. The women were randomized to receive one of three treatments: acupuncture specific for depression; control acupuncture, during which needles were inserted in points not known to help alleviate depressive symptoms; or massage. All of the women received eight weeks of therapy and were assessed for depression at the four- and eight-week marks by an interviewer who was unaware of the treatment each woman received.

The researchers found that women who received the depression-specific acupuncture experienced a bigger reduction in depression symptoms than the women in the other groups. The response rate - defined as having a 50 percent or greater reduction in symptoms - was 63 percent for the women receiving depression-specific acupuncture, compared with 44 percent for the women in the other two treatment groups combined.

The researchers weren't surprised by what they found - a pilot study yielded similar results, and other studies have shown acupuncture is an effective treatment for depression in the general public - but they were pleased with the results.

"I don't think that one-size-fits-all treatments are appropriate for everyone, but acupuncture should be considered as an option," said Lyell. "I hope that people will respect the rigorous methodology used in this blinded, randomized, controlled trial and accept the result: Traditional acupuncture was associated with a significant improvement in depression."

Both Manber and Lyell said they plan to continue their research on women's health during pregnancy and postpartum. Lyell recently presented work showing that practitioners under-identify and under-acknowledge depression during pregnancy, and she's now analyzing birth-outcome data to look for correlations between depression, treatment and obstetric outcomes.

This study was funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality. Other Stanford authors on the study include Rosa Schnyer, DAOM; Andrea Chambers, PhD; Maurice Druzin, MD; Erin Carlyle; Christine Celio; Jenna Gress; Mary Huang; Tasha Kalista and Robin Martin-Okada.

Source:
Michelle Brandt
Stanford University Medical Center
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 01-04-2010 12:33    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Acupuncture may be an effective treatment for post-viral infection loss of smell
http://www.physorg.com/news189317612.html

Traditional Chinese acupuncture (TCA), where very thin needles are used to stimulate specific points in the body to elicit beneficial therapeutic responses, may be an effective treatment option for patients who suffer from persistent post- viral olfactory dysfunction (PVOD), according to new research in the April 2010 issue of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery.

Olfactory dysfunction can arise from a variety of causes and can profoundly influence a patient's quality of life. The sense of smell determines the flavor of foods and beverages and also serves as an early warning system for the detection of environmental hazards, such as spoiled food, leaking natural gas, smoke, or airborne pollutants. The loss or distortions of smell sensation can adversely influence food preference, food intake, and appetite.

Approximately 2 million Americans experience some type of olfactory dysfunction. One of the most frequent causes of loss of smell in adults is an upper respiratory tract infection (URI). Patients usually complain of smell loss following a viral URI. The smell loss is most commonly partial, and reversible. However, occasionally patients may also present with parosmia (a distortion of the sense of smell), phantosmia (smelling things that aren't there), or permanent damage of the olfactory system.

To date, there is no validated pharmacotherapy for PVOD, but attempts have been made to establish a standardized treatment. In the literature, systemic and topical steroids as well as vitamin B supplements, caroverine, alpha lipoic acid, and other drugs were used to treat patients. The researchers point out that in addition to these treatments, complementary and alternative medicines are currently being employed by many patients on their own, and that exploration into their usefulness by traditional Western medicine should be validated.

In the current study, 15 patients presenting to an outpatient clinic with PVOD were treated by TCA in 10 weekly 30-minute sessions. Subjective olfactometry was performed using the Sniffin' Sticks test set. Treatment success was defined as an increase of at least six points in the sticks test scores. The effects of TCA were compared to matched pairs of people suffering from PVOD who had been treated with vitamin B complex. Eight patients treated with TCA improved olfactory function, compared with two treated with vitamin B complex.

The authors acknowledge that their study is limited by its size, and that further studies should be conducted in a larger population. However, the authors write "…the observed high response rate of about 50 percent under TCA was superior to that of vitamin B complex or that of spontaneous remission, and offers a possible new therapeutic regimen in postviral dysosmia."

Provided by American Academy of Otolaryngology
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PostPosted: 26-04-2010 11:34    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

Why acupuncture aids spinal recovery

* 11:18 26 April 2010 by Wendy Zukerman
*

Aiding recovery (Image: Garo/Phanie/Rex Features)

Aiding recovery (Image: Garo/Phanie/Rex Features)


Rats with damaged spines can walk again thanks to acupuncture. But it's not due to improvements in their energy flow or "chi". Instead, the ancient treatment seems to stop nerve cell death by reducing inflammation.

Acupuncture's scientific credentials are growing. Trials show that it improves sensory and motor functions in people with spinal cord injuries.

To find out why, Doo Choi and his colleagues at Kyung Hee University in Seoul, South Korea, damaged the spines of 75 rats. One-third were given acupuncture in two locations: Shuigou – between their snout and mouth, and Yanglingquan – in the upper hind leg. Others received no treatment or "simulated acupuncture".

After 35 days, the acupuncture group were able to stand at a steeper incline than the others and walk better. Staining their paws with ink revealed that their forelimb-hindlimb coordination was fairly consistent and that there was very little toe dragging, whereas the control groups still dragged their feet.
Inflamed spines

The rats in the acupuncture group also had less nerve cell death and lower levels of proteins known to induce inflammation after spinal cord injury and make neural damage worse.

One explanation is that sharp needles prompt a stress response that dampens down inflammation. In humans, the inflammation that follows spinal cord injury is known to be responsible for nerve cell death.

Zhen Zheng of the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in Australia says the results are "very encouraging". But she says we don't yet know if the results will apply to humans.

For example, the acupuncture treatment on the rats was given almost immediately after injury, but most patients don't seek acupuncture until at least three months after damage to their spines.

Journal reference: Neurobiology of Disease, DOI: 10.1016/j.nbd.2010.04.003



http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn18817-why-acupuncture-aids-spinal-recovery.html?full=true&print=true
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 02-05-2010 14:00    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Study Supports Acupuncture Effects In Pain Control
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/187292.php
02 May 2010

The scientific validity of traditional Chinese medicine for pain treatment of pain received a nod of support in the May issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia, official journal of the International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS).

Dr. Philip Lang and colleagues of the University of Munich used quantitative sensory testing to identify changes in pain sensitivity with acupuncture in 24 healthy volunteers. After applying acupuncture to the leg, the researchers found that pain thresholds increased by up to 50 percent. Effects were noted in both the treated leg and the untreated (contralateral) leg.

Tests Show Measurable and Specific Effects of Acupuncture on Pain

Quantitative sensory testing is used clinically to help physicians understand specific injuries in nerve fibers associated with chronic pain. It includes tests of both thermal perception (heat and cold), and mechanical perception (pressure applied to the skin). The patterns of response provide diagnostic information in patients with nerve injury regarding the type of nerve involved, and possible treatments.

The results pointed to two nerve fibers-the "A delta" pain fibers and the "C" pain fibers-as being specifically affected by acupuncture. Although the effects were modest, the researchers believe they provide the basis for future studies in individuals with chronic pain, where the effects might be more dramatic.

The study also supported the effects of three different forms of acupuncture: manual acupuncture needling alone and with the addition of high-frequency and low-frequency electrical stimulation. All treatments were performed by an experienced acupuncturist, applied to acupuncture points commonly used in pain management.

The results provide a scientific background for the ancient practice of acupuncture, according to Dr. Dominik Irnich, Head of the Multidisciplinary Pain Centre, Department of Anesthesiology, University of Munich, and the study's leading author. Additionally, Dr. Irnich notes, "Our results show that contralateral stimulation leads to a remarkable pain relief. This suggests that acupuncturists should needle contralaterally if the affected side is too painful or not accessible-for example, if the skin is injured or there is a dressing in place."

Dr. Steven L. Shafer, Editor-in-Chief of Anesthesia & Analgesia and Professor of Anesthesiology at Columbia University, views the results as an important preliminary finding. "Reproducible findings are the cornerstone of scientific inquiry," Dr. Shafer comments. "The authors have clearly described their methodology, and their findings. If other laboratories can reproduce these results in properly controlled studies, then this provides further support for the scientific basis of acupuncture. Additionally, the ability of quantitative sensory testing to identify specific types of nerves involved in pain transmission may help direct research into the mechanism of acupuncture analgesia."

About Anesthesia & Analgesia

Anesthesia & Analgesia was founded in 1922 and was issued bi-monthly until 1980, when it became a monthly publication. A&A is the leading journal for anesthesia clinicians and researchers and includes more than 500 articles annually in all areas related to anesthesia and analgesia, such as cardiovascular anesthesiology, patient safety, anesthetic pharmacology, and pain management. The journal is published on behalf of the IARS by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins (LWW), a division of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Source
International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS)
Copyright: Medical News Today
Not to be reproduced without permission of Medical News Today

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PostPosted: 08-05-2010 13:33    Post subject: Reply with quote

I usually treat alternative medicine with a dose of skepticism however I have to admit that I am willing to give acupuncture the benefit of the doubt.

25ish years ago my Dad started having these blinding headaches that kept him bedridden. He went to the doctor who prescribed all sorts of painkillers and nothing worked. He was then sent to a specialist who after finding nothing wrong announced that it was ‘all in his head’ and advised his doctor to prescribe him anti-depressants Rolling Eyes .

Luckily his doctor knew the kind of man my Dad was and knew that he was in actual pain so in a last ditch effort suggested that he try acupuncture. Now my Dad had never heard of this before but he was desperate for relief so he went south and he said that the guy checked him out and diagnosed him with a trapped nerve in his neck area. He said that during the first appointment he felt a slight relief in the pain and after all the treatments were done the pain was gone, which pretty much made a believer out of him.
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