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Saxon & Anglo-Saxon Artifacts: New Discoveries.
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ramonmercadoOnline
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PostPosted: 27-06-2006 10:06    Post subject: Saxon & Anglo-Saxon Artifacts: New Discoveries. Reply with quote

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Unique sword brings prestige to Northumberland


A sword found at Bamburgh Castle, Northumberland has been declared the only one of its kind in the world. The 7th century Anglo Saxon weapon was found in 1960 by archaeologists working on the Bamburgh Research Project, including the late Dr Brian Hope-Taylor, and was rediscovered by chance following his death in 2001 when it passed into the hands of the Scottish Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland. X-rays revealed the sword blade to have been made up of six individual strands of iron bonded together in a technique rarely before seen. Swords comprising four iron strands have been found previously but this is the first six stranded find ever recorded.

"We see a lot of swords here, but have never seen anything like this before,” said Dr David Starley, of the Royal Armouries in Leeds, “X-rays showed it to be an exceptional sword blade which is obviously of very high status and of European significance." The complexity of the design implies that the sword was created for a high ranking individual, possibly a king or a valued warrior.

Archaeologist Paul Gething remarked that the sword would have been instantly recognisable as a status symbol and would have significantly increased the prestige of its bearer; “In these times it was a case of the more ostentatious the better." he said. Both the construction of the blade and its highly decorated nature suggest a great deal of work was carried out in its creation which could have taken up to two months, and employed state of the art technology for its time.

Now, using modern technology it is hoped that more of the history of the sword can be revealed. A sample has been sent to the Royal Armouries in Leeds to help build a 3D image of what the sword looked like in its prime and metallurgical testing will enable experts to determine the exact constituents of the weapon. The fascinating blade is now on display at its former home in Bamburgh Castle. (June 23rd)

Charlie Cottrell

See the History Today articles:
Roman Britain to Anglo-Saxon England (October 1990)

The Making of England (February 1995)



Sword



Edit to amend subject title.


Last edited by ramonmercado on 21-12-2010 16:43; edited 2 times in total
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H_JamesOffline
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PostPosted: 27-06-2006 11:27    Post subject: Reply with quote

My sister did some digging in Bamburgh castle, not in 1960 obviously.
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lemonpie3Offline
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PostPosted: 27-06-2006 13:45    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been to the beach that runs in front of the castle, it's brilliant!
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PostPosted: 27-06-2006 14:59    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe this sword is Excalibur?
My imagination running away with me again...
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ramonmercadoOnline
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PostPosted: 29-08-2006 10:17    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Rare Saxon belt goes on display

The buckle was unearthed on the outskirts of London

A rare Anglo-Saxon belt buckle found by a treasure hunter with a metal detector is going on public display for the first time. The copper alloy buckle dates from between AD600 and AD720 and is only the second one of its type found in England.

It was unearthed recently on the outskirts of London by Bill Robson, who handed it to the Museum of London.

The belt is rare because it is in a style normally found in Spain.

Faye Simpson, community archaeologist at the museum, said: "This buckle is as beautiful as anything you could hope to find on Bond Street and would originally have been gilded - probably in gold or tin.

"This is a really exciting find, which has come to light through responsible metal detecting."




http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/london/5292646.stm
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ramonmercadoOnline
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PostPosted: 08-01-2007 11:19    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Anglo Saxon Sword new treasure at the BM


The remains of a 7th century sword, unearthed in a Lincolnshire field have proved a real treasure trove for the man who discovered them. The gold and garnet sword pommel and hilts were found by a metal detectorist in 2002 near the Lincolnshire town of Market Rasen. An independent treasure valuation committee placed their value at £12,500 and through funding assistance from the National Heritage Memorial Fund and the Friends of the British Museum the exceptional items have now been acquired into the British Museum collection.

The remains are the first known examples of their type from Anglo Saxon England and offer vital clues, not only to the skills and trades of Anglo Saxon artisans, an area of history of which little is currently known, but also into the position England held in the wider community of that era. Similar sword designs have been found in Spain and Italy suggesting a mobility of people and goods in this period. The large garnet settings of the pommel are also of value to the history of gem stone trading and provenance since semi precious stones were in short supply in the 7th century when jewel resources from India and Sri Lanka had dried up.

“It is wonderful that the generous support of the National Heritage Memorial Fund and the British Museum Friends has enabled us to preserve this extraordinary set of sword hilt fittings in the public domain.” Said Sonja Marzinzik, Curator of Prehistory and Europe at the British Museum, “We will probably never know whether the sword they decorated was ever used in battle, but there is no doubt that it would have been a stunning weapon to anyone who saw it.” (January 5th)

Charlie Cottrell

Sword
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synchronicityOffline
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PostPosted: 28-01-2007 07:23    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aha! So that's where I left that damned sword!

Been looking for it for ages.

I'll nip over to the Museum and reclaim my property soon. Cool
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ramonmercadoOnline
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PostPosted: 21-11-2007 12:20    Post subject: Reply with quote

More great finds at an ancient graveyard. But is this a case of robbing the dead? How long do you have to buried before its legal to make off with possessions buried with you?

Quote:
'Dramatic' ancient cemetery found

The artefacts will be valued by the British Museum
A freelance archaeologist has uncovered what is thought to be the only known Anglo-Saxon royal burial site in the north of England.
Spectacular gold jewellery, weapons and clothing were found at the 109-grave cemetery, believed to date from the middle of the 7th Century.

Excavations were carried out after Steve Sherlock studied an aerial photo of the land near Redcar, Teesside.

Traditionally, Anglo-Saxon royalty were buried in the south, say experts.

The royals found near Redcar could be linked to the Kentish Princess Ethelburga who travelled north to marry Edwin, King of Northumbria.

Excavations began in 2005 and continued under Mr Sherlock's supervision with help from local archaeologists and volunteers.

After working six weeks every summer, the team has uncovered an area the size of half a football pitch near Loftus.

More at: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/tees/7104498.stm
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ramonmercadoOnline
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PostPosted: 19-05-2010 15:05    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Anglo-Saxon finds at new Cheltenham academy site
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/gloucestershire/8691565.stm

The site of the dig
The discoveries were made at the former Kingsmead School site

An Anglo-Saxon settlement has been discovered on the site of the new All Saints' Academy in Cheltenham.

Two skeletons, pottery and a large timber hall, all thought to date back to between the 6th to 8th Century, have been uncovered.

Steve Sheldon, of Cotswold Archaeology, said it was previously thought the area did not succumb to Saxon control during that period.

He said the settlement was one of the best finds of his career.

'Saxon influence'

It is thought the hall, measuring 11m by 6m (36ft by 20ft), was used for communal events such as feasts.

Mr Sheldon, who is directing the excavation, said he "didn't expect to find much" when the team started work.

Cliff Bateman, project manager at Cotswold Archaeology, said: "It would now appear that there were more pockets of Anglo-Saxon control in the Severn Valley than we previously thought.

"Anglo-Saxon burials have been found in Bishops Cleeve and Tewkesbury, but this discovery shows Saxon influence right on the very doorstep of Gloucester."

The academy is being built on the site of the former Kingsmead School.

'Learning opportunity'

Pupils from the former school, and from Christ College, will have a chance to look at the finds on 25 May before they are removed for dating and recording.

The items will then be donated to Cheltenham Museum.

Construction on the site is continuing and the academy is still on track to open in September 2011.

Helena Arnold, director of children and young people's department at Gloucester Diocese, said: "This will provide an excellent learning opportunity for students even before the construction process is under way.

"Whilst the academy looks to the future to provide first class facilities for the 21st Century, the archaeological find is an opportunity too for students to learn about the past and the culture from which we have developed."
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PostPosted: 16-08-2010 08:22    Post subject: Reply with quote

How Sittingbourne discovered an archaeological treasure trove
A major haul of Anglo Saxon treasures has electrified the town's residents
Maev Kennedy guardian.co.uk, Sunday 15 August 2010 20.00 BST

Any day now the 11,000th visitor will wander into a small shopping arcade off the bedraggled main street of Sittingbourne in Kent, between the cash-for-gold jeweller's and the discount shop selling bales of cheap loo rolls, set down their shopping bags, and watch the history of Kent being rewritten.

An empty premises last used as a Christmas shop is now CSI Sittingbourne, an improvised laboratory where volunteers including – on this visit – teachers, housewives, a prison officer, students, a surgeon, pensioners and young mothers, are doing museum quality conservation work on spectacular finds from a major Anglo Saxon cemetery just outside the town. The cemetery, a find of international importance, came as a shock to Canterbury Archaeological Trust which had been keeping a rather bored watching brief on a building site believed to have been scoured clean by Victorian brick-clay diggers.

But thousands of objects have poured from hundreds of graves, some of royal quality. Volunteers have worked on beautiful garnet-and-gold jewellery, a gilt bronze buckle and sword mount strikingly like the Staffordshire hoard which caused world wide excitement last year, amber and glass jewellery, pots and jars, and two cow-horn shaped Frankish drinking glasses buried at either side of their proud owner's head. The volunteers are all trained and supervised by a highly experienced professional, Dana Goodburn-Brown, who is also a local resident and a force of nature. She has ruthlessly scavenged from former employers: the display cases came from an exhibition in Poland, the Museum of London loaned equipment. Tesco, the mall owner, has just extended use of the shop, rent, electricity and security free, so the work goes on at least until Christmas.

So far Goodburn-Brown has logged more than 1,200 volunteer hours, worth almost £250,000 if done professionally. The garnet brooch they cleaned may have lain on the breast of a princess, but more modest finds are also crucial. Dessicated insects, grass and fabric fibres may eventually help prove a gruesome theory that some Anglo Saxon dead lay in their graves for days or weeks, dressed in their finest and surrounded by their treasures, for friends and relatives to visit before they were finally buried.

"I've found a bug!" grandmother Sylvia Blackwell says, waving her scalpel. "This is one of the most exciting days of my life."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2010/aug/15/sittingbourne-treasure-trove
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ramonmercadoOnline
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PostPosted: 04-09-2010 13:59    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Saxon boat uncovered in Norfolk's River Ant
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-norfolk-11187207

Saxon boat Five animal skulls were found near the hollowed oak boat

A Saxon boat has been found during flood defence work on a Norfolk river.

The boat, which is about 9.8 ft (3m) long and had been hollowed out by hand from a piece of oak, was found at the bottom of the River Ant.

Five animal skulls were found near the boat, which has been taken to York for treatment to preserve it.

The Environment Agency had commissioned work to take place between Horning Hall and Browns Hill when the discovery was made last month.

Once preservation has been finished the vessel will return to Norfolk, where the Norfolk Museums and Archaeology Service want to display it at Norwich Castle Museum, an Environment Agency spokeswoman said.

Environment Agency project manager, Paul Mitchelmore, said: "This is the latest in a number of remarkable finds on the project.

"We are pleased that the Environment Agency has been able to uncover items that contribute to the knowledge of the rich history of the local area."
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PostPosted: 04-09-2010 19:16    Post subject: Reply with quote

More Saxon archaeology:

Digging for Britain - 3. Anglo-Saxons

The Anglo-Saxons - they divided our land and heralded the arrival of the Dark Ages. But were they really just barbarians?

Dr Alice Roberts continues her journey through a year of archaeology, visiting the key sites that are throwing light on this most mysterious of periods. She visits the royal seat of power at Bamburgh, Northumbria and sees how the skeletons tell tales of violent death, but also of tenderness.

There's a remarkable community project in a shopping centre in Sittingbourne where people are curating the grave goods of their own ancestors. And there are treasures that make her wonder just how dark the Dark Ages really were.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b00tnpy8/Digging_for_Britain_AngloSaxons/
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PostPosted: 04-09-2010 20:07    Post subject: Reply with quote

The above mentioned prog also contains info on research into Queen Eadgyth (Edith), half-sister of King Athelstan, as mentioned in Forgotten History:
http://www.forteantimes.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=992083#992083
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PostPosted: 04-09-2010 20:53    Post subject: Reply with quote

talking of Dr Alice Roberts - I seem to have missed this prog:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00t9r28

don't know when the digging for britain series was filmed but I expect we'll be hearing the patter of tiny feet soon. oh looks like they've arrived - she now has a daughter according to her biog.
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PostPosted: 21-10-2010 09:15    Post subject: Reply with quote

Britain's first hospital discovered
A site which may house Britain's earliest known hospital has been uncovered by archaeologists.
Published: 2:49PM BST 20 Oct 2010

Radio carbon analysis at the former Leper Hospital at St Mary Magdalen in Winchester, Hampshire, has provided a date range of AD 960-1030 for a series of burials, many exhibiting evidence of leprosy, on the site.

A number of other artefacts, pits, and postholes also relate to the same time including what appears to be a large sunken structure underneath a medieval infirmary.

Before this new claim, most historians and archaeologists thought that hospitals in the Britain only dated from after the Norman conquest of 1066.

''This is an important archaeological development,'' said Dr Simon Roffey from the University of Winchester which conducted the dig.

''Historically, it has always been assumed that hospitals were a post-conquest phenomena, the majority founded from the late 11th century onwards.

''However, our excavations have revealed a range of buildings and, more significantly, convincing evidence for a foundation in the 10th century.

''Our excavations at St Mary Magdalen offer an intriguing insight into a little known aspect of the history of both Winchester and England. It is undoubtedly a site of national importance.''

Among the earliest known hospitals in the UK is Harbledown in Canterbury founded by Lanfranc in the 1070s, following the Norman Conquest.

Professor Nicholas Orme, a leading researcher on medieval hospitals, added: ''I have only studied the documentary evidence but I could not find any such evidence for a hospital before 1066 except perhaps as an activity within a monastery or minster.

''A late Anglo-Saxon hospital would surely be a first for archaeology and indeed for history.''

Winchester was the capital of England throughout a large part of the Anglo-Saxon period and after the Norman Conquest. The capital was moved to London from the Hampshire city in the 12th century.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/8076027/Britains-first-hospital-discovered.html
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