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Roman Britain: New Findings & Discoveries.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 04-01-2012 10:31    Post subject: Reply with quote

Roman brothel token discovered in Thames
A Roman coin that was probably used by soldiers to pay for sex in brothels has been discovered on the banks of the River Thames.
By Daily Telegraph Reporter
7:00AM GMT 04 Jan 2012

Made from bronze and smaller than a ten pence piece, the coin depicts a man and a woman engaged in an intimate act.
Experts believe it is the first example of its kind to be found in Britain. It lay preserved in mud for almost 2,000 years until it was unearthed by an amateur archaeologist with a metal detector.

On the reverse of the token is the numeral XIIII, which historians say could indicate that the holder handed over 14 small Roman coins called asses to buy it. This would have been the equivalent of one day’s pay for a labourer in the first century AD.
The holder would then have taken the token to one of the many Londinium brothels and handed it to a sex slave in exchange for the act depicted on the coin.

The token was found by pastry chef Regis Cursan, 37, who made the discovery near Putney Bridge in West London.
He told the Daily Mail yesterday: “The day I made the find it was a very low, early tide and raining heavily. At first I thought it was a Roman coin, because of the thickness and diameter.
“When I rubbed the sand off the artefact the first thing I saw was the number on one side and what I thought was a goddess on the other. Little did I know at the time it was actually a rare Roman brothel token. To find something like that is a truly exciting find.”

The token has been donated to the Museum of London, where it will be on display for the next three months. Curator Caroline McDonald said: “This is the only one of its kind ever to be found in Great Britain.
“When we realised it was a saucy picture, we had a bit of a giggle but there’s also a sad story behind it because these prostitutes were slaves.
“It has resonance with modern-day London because people are still being sold into the sex trade.”

The object, dated to around the first century AD, was protected from corrosion by the mud. Similar tokens have been found elsewhere in the Roman Empire, but this is the first time one has been unearthed in the UK.

Some historians believe the Romans invented prostitution in the modern sense.
It played a significant part in the empire’s economy – with sex workers required to register with the local authorities and even pay tax.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/8991212/Roman-brothel-token-discovered-in-Thames.html

"This token entitles the bearer to..." Cool
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Heckler20Offline
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PostPosted: 04-01-2012 10:46    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner2 wrote:
"This token entitles the bearer to..." Cool


One wonders where you inserted the token?
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Ronson8Offline
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PostPosted: 04-01-2012 11:34    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner2 wrote:


"This token entitles the bearer to..." Cool

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v312/grained/token.jpg
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YithianOffline
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PostPosted: 04-01-2012 11:54    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner2 wrote:

“It has resonance with modern-day London because people are still being sold into the sex trade.”


Don't bother, Caroline.

It isn't and needn't be particularly relevant/resonant to London or the modern world any more than it would be any other major city. It's genuinely interesting in and of itself, and you can just leave it at that. Save the PC-nonsense for the funding applications.

Any why must we assume that all prostitution is coercive? For some it's a career choice.
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MythopoeikaOffline
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PostPosted: 04-01-2012 20:06    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ronson8 wrote:
rynner2 wrote:


"This token entitles the bearer to..." Cool



Yup, it's a blowjob token. Very Happy
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Ronson8Offline
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PostPosted: 04-01-2012 22:33    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mythopoeika wrote:
Ronson8 wrote:
rynner2 wrote:


"This token entitles the bearer to..." Cool



Yup, it's a blowjob token. Very Happy

Yep, hence the phrase blowing my wages. Laughing
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 04-01-2012 22:50    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't know where Ronson found that image, but it's clearly a No. 7 (VII), and seems to represent a blow job.

But the London token is a number 14 (XIIII), so what does that qualify for?! Shocked
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JamesWhiteheadOffline
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PostPosted: 05-01-2012 04:34    Post subject: Reply with quote

If he gave up 14 asses, it should at least be a donkey. Shocked
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Jerry_BOffline
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PostPosted: 05-01-2012 09:55    Post subject: Reply with quote

theyithian wrote:
Don't bother, Caroline.

It isn't and needn't be particularly relevant/resonant to London or the modern world any more than it would be any other major city. It's genuinely interesting in and of itself, and you can just leave it at that. Save the PC-nonsense for the funding applications.

Any why must we assume that all prostitution is coercive? For some it's a career choice.


I think she's referring more to the fact that prostitutes were slaves, often as not. So the element of choice there is not an option.
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 14-03-2012 12:35    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Roman kiln unearthed by builders at Norton Primary School
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-york-north-yorkshire-17366826

The county council said the find was one of the most significant in the area since the 1940s

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The remains of a Roman kiln have been discovered by builders working at a school in North Yorkshire.

The discovery was made during construction of a £1.5m extension at Norton Primary School near Malton.

North Yorkshire County Council said the kiln was the first major find in the area since the 1940s.

The kiln was found along with fragments of pottery. Archaeologists also uncovered ditches believed to be of a Romano-British date.

A Roman fort existed on the north side of the River Derwent at Malton and previous work at the school had uncovered Roman, medieval and post-medieval pottery.

An investigation of the site by an archaeological team was a condition of planning approval for work at the school.

The county council, which is responsible for the site, said the kiln was being excavated in such a way that it could be reconstructed elsewhere.

It would not be possible to preserve it on site.

Chris Metcalfe, North Yorkshire's executive member for the Historic Environment Team said: "This is a very exciting and significant find for the local community and for the school.

"As the excavation did not delay the building work this is still scheduled to complete on time.

"This is an excellent example of effective team work between building contractors and archaeologists."

A report on the kiln will be submitted to the county's Historic Environment Record on completion of all the work at the site.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 22-03-2012 17:52    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hoard of Roman coins found near Roman Baths in Bath

More than 30,000 Roman coins have been found by archaeologists working on the site of a new hotel in Bath.
The silver coins are believed to date from 270AD and are being described as the fifth largest hoard ever found.
They were discovered by archaeologists working 150 metres from the historic Roman Baths.
The coins are fused together and have been sent to the British Museum. Conservators are expected to take at least a year to work through them.

A campaign has been started by officials at the Roman Baths to try to raise £150,000 to acquire and display the collection which has become known as the Beau Street Hoard.
The size of the hoard found in Bath is not as large as the Frome Hoard in April 2010 when more than 53,500 coins were discovered by metal detectorist Dave Crisp near Frome in Somerset.
The coins found in this hoard date from a similar time and are thought to be the largest ever discovered in a Roman town in the UK.

Roman Baths spokesman Stephen Clews said the find had been declared treasure trove.
"We've put in a request for a formal valuation and then hope to buy the coins to display them at the baths.
"At the time there was a lot of unrest in the Roman Empire so there may be some explanation for why the coins were hidden away.
"The find is also unusual as it was discovered by professional archaeologists as opposed to an amateur using a metal detector," he added.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-somerset-17480016
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 26-06-2012 07:05    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not strictly Britain, but close enough! Wink

Roman and Celtic coin hoard found in Jersey

One of Europe's largest hoards of Iron Age coins has been unearthed in Jersey, according to an expert.
The Roman and Celtic coins, which date from the 1st Century BC, were found by two metal detector enthusiasts.

Dr Philip de Jersey, a former Celtic coin expert at Oxford University, said the haul was "extremely exciting and very significant".
The hoard is likely to be worth millions of pounds with each individual coin worth between £100 and £200.

The exact number of coins found has not been established but archaelogists said the hoard weighed about half a tonne. Shocked

The exact location of the hoard has not been revealed by the authorities.
It was found by Reg Mead and Richard Miles in a field in the east of Jersey.
They had been searching for more than 30 years after hearing rumours that a farmer had discovered silver coins while working on his land.

Mr Mead and Mr Miles worked with experts from Jersey Heritage to slowly unearth the treasure.
A large mound of clay containing the coins has now been taken to the Jersey archive centre to be examined.
It is the first hoard of coins found in the island for more than 60 years.

Several hoards of Celtic coins have been found in Jersey before but the largest was in 1935 at La Marquanderie when more than 11,000 were discovered.

Dr de Jersey said it would take months for archaelogists to find out the full value of the haul.
He said: "It is extremely exciting and very significant. It will add a huge amount of new information, not just about the coins themselves but the people who were using them.
"Most archaeologist with an interest in coins spend their lives in libraries writing about coins and looking at pictures of coins.
"For me as an archaeologist, with an interest in coins, to actually go out and excavate one in a field, most of us never get that opportunity. It is a once in a lifetime opportunity."

The ownership of the coins is unclear. Mr Mead said he had asked the States of Jersey for clarification.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-jersey-18579868

Two 'name' coincidences in this story: the coins were discovered by two men with the initials RM; and Dr de Jersey got to go to Jersey to help uncover them! Cool
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 07-08-2012 19:10    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Roman dig reveals early Christian graves
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cumbria-19097827

The discoveries were in "remarkable condition"

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Early Christian graves recently unearthed by archaeologists are to be the highlight of daily tours of Maryport Roman fort.

Visitors to Senhouse Roman Museum, which is at the fort, will find out what happens during excavations.

They will also be able to see recently unearthed evidence of Christian graves during the daily tours until 14 August.

A spokesman for the museum said the discovery of the graves was exciting and shed "new light" on the Dark Ages.

Remnants from the grave include bone fragments, caps of tooth enamel, and a thumbnail-sized piece of textiles.

Peter Greggains, of the Senhouse Museum Trust, said: "The Maryport site's importance as a unique and valuable resource capable of providing information about the remote past has been established beyond doubt, and we now have new light on the Dark Ages."

Child's grave
Tony Wilmot, site director said: "It will take a while to process all the information following the dig, but what we think we're looking at now is a Christian cemetery close to a sequence of Christian religious buildings.

Continue reading the main story

Start Quote

The Maryport site's importance as a unique and valuable resource”

Peter Greggains
Senhouse Museum Trust
"If this is the case, then this is a very exciting discovery - an early post-Roman Christian religious site occupied at the same time as other famous early Christian sites at Whithorn and Hoddom in nearby Dumfriesshire."

A number of graves have been revealed, and it is believed a very small stone-lined grave is the resting place of a child.

The dig site will be open to visitors from 1100 BST to 1600 BST to 14 August.
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 12-08-2012 17:08    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Roman altar found at Maryport dig
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-19224154

The altar is on display at Senhouse Roman Museum

Related Stories

'Fantastic results' at Roman dig
Roman mystery solved by fort find

An altar has been discovered at the site of a Roman fort in Cumbria, the first such find for 142 years.

The inscribed artefact was uncovered intact during an archaeological dig on the edge of Maryport.

It was described as in "beautiful condition" and because it was face down in a pit its dedication to the god "Jupiter Optimus Maximus" was intact.

The altar will join 17 others unearthed by landowner Humphrey Senhouse in 1870 which are in the town's Roman museum.

The manager of the Senhouse Roman Museum described the altar as "rare and special".

Dated to the 2nd or 3rd Century AD, it was inscribed on behalf of Titus Attius Tutor, commander of the First Cohort of Baetasian, which came to Maryport from what is now the Netherlands.

'Over the moon'
It was found on Wednesday by John Murray, a volunteer on the dig, who said it "felt fantastic" to be the first person to touch it for at least 1,600 years.

The location was in a large pit which would once have underpinned a massive timber edifice, occupying the highest point of the ridge overlooking the Solway Firth and Maryport's Roman fort.

Professor Ian Haynes, from Newcastle University, said the find confirmed the theory that at some point the altars lost their significance and were used by the Romans in building work.

Previously, it was thought that the altars were ritually buried.

He added: "Finds like this don't come up very often, so I think people are over the moon actually.

"It's really a tremendous reward for all the hard work they've put into the site."
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 09-10-2012 07:14    Post subject: Reply with quote

Roman marble coffin sells for £96,000

A Roman marble coffin has sold at auction for £96,000.
The 7ft (2.1m) sarcophagus was being used as a trough to stand flowers in in the garden of a house in Dorset, where its significance was recognised by Guy Schwinge, a Dorchester auction valuer.

Mr Schwinge described how he spotted the coffin "peeping out from under some bushes" during a routine valuation.
"As I drew closer I realised I was looking at a Roman sarcophagus of exceptional quality," he said.

Mr Schwinge, of Duke's in Dorchester, discovered the family had acquired the sarcophagus almost 100 years ago at auction.
An auction catalogue from 1913 shows the coffin was imported to Britain by Queen Victoria's surveyor of pictures, Sir John Robinson, who lived at Newton Manor in Swanage, Dorset.
"When I saw the name Duke's on the front (of the catalogue) I couldn't believe it," Mr Schwinge said.

The rectangular sarcophagus is carved from fine quality white marble, said a spokesman for Duke's, who sold the coffin for a second time.
The quality of the carving suggests it was made for a high status individual.
Experts from the British Museum have estimated the sarcophagus dates from the 2nd Century.

The owners were "utterly delighted" with the sale, Duke's said.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-dorset-19878090
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