Forums

 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages 
Thylacine post 1936 sightings
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Fortean Times Message Board Forum Index -> Cryptozoology - mystery quadrupeds
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
oldroverOffline
Great Old One
Joined: 18 Oct 2009
Total posts: 2289
Location: Wales
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 19-07-2012 15:12    Post subject: Reply with quote

[img][/img]
Back to top
View user's profile 
oldroverOffline
Great Old One
Joined: 18 Oct 2009
Total posts: 2289
Location: Wales
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 20-07-2012 21:12    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here are the photos at this link as well as some fairly rarely produced images of them.

http://s1170.photobucket.com/albums/r536/revotisThartmannIII/?action=view&current=Tigers1977.jpg

The one with the female carrying young in the foreground is quite common but it shows the thickening at the base of the tail which is where healthy individuals stored up fat, note that none of the other specimens have this.
Back to top
View user's profile 
oldroverOffline
Great Old One
Joined: 18 Oct 2009
Total posts: 2289
Location: Wales
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 22-08-2012 21:23    Post subject: Reply with quote

Came across this;

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=95ntTQtgF4kC&pg=PA231&lpg=PA231&dq=thylacine+maximum+size&source=bl&ots=FPTYA-FFJW&sig=vLd8PcVfB03KViKm2sp1wpb

Presumably from some sort of 'Fate' compilation. Anyone looking at it should scroll up one page to the beginning of the chapter.

I liked it because it obviously comes from the early Eighties, a time when there most probably still were thylacines out there. Much of it though is totally outdated or downright wrong.
Back to top
View user's profile 
oldroverOffline
Great Old One
Joined: 18 Oct 2009
Total posts: 2289
Location: Wales
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 28-10-2012 20:01    Post subject: Reply with quote

lordmongrove wrote:
Yes the mountain tribes in New Guinea call thylacines Dobsenga. They descripbe them as being like dogs with striped hindquaters and stiff tails. They say they come down from the mountains and kill pigs and other livestock. They are not hunted as they are 'taboo'. They have identified thylacine pictures as being dobsenga.


Stiff tails don't point to a thylacine so much as one of our many misconceptions about them. As Paddle points out looking at the known photos of the animal clearly shows their tails were as flexible as a dogs.

I realise that this isn't the most timely reply ever.
Back to top
View user's profile 
lordmongroveOffline
Great Old One
Joined: 30 May 2009
Total posts: 951
Location: Exeter
Age: 44
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 30-10-2012 01:16    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm not 100% convinced of these pix but as for people not having heard of the thylacine, the CFZ have an intern who is an animal husbandry student. She is interested in cryptozoology, especialy magalania and homanids. She had never heard of the thylacine!!!!!!!
Back to top
View user's profile 
lordmongroveOffline
Great Old One
Joined: 30 May 2009
Total posts: 951
Location: Exeter
Age: 44
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 30-11-2012 04:42    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.edgeofexistence.org/mammals/species_info.php?id=545

From the EDGE website, intresting info on post 'extinction' sightings.
Back to top
View user's profile 
oldroverOffline
Great Old One
Joined: 18 Oct 2009
Total posts: 2289
Location: Wales
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 30-11-2012 08:09    Post subject: Reply with quote

Personally whenever I hear the last captive was female or that they could open their jaws to 180 degrees I click off.
Back to top
View user's profile 
oldroverOffline
Great Old One
Joined: 18 Oct 2009
Total posts: 2289
Location: Wales
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 12-12-2012 22:01    Post subject: Reply with quote

New, or at least new to me, group.

http://www.thylacineresearchunit.org/

Sadly for a group who claim to be

Quote:
a committed group of scientists, naturalists and specialists from diverse backgrounds.


Their description of the animal is identical to the wikipedia page. What does that say for their credibility?
Back to top
View user's profile 
oldroverOffline
Great Old One
Joined: 18 Oct 2009
Total posts: 2289
Location: Wales
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 06-01-2013 16:52    Post subject: Reply with quote

Getting back to the photo of the naturalistically placed mount from a few months back, here it is in colour;

http://s1170.photobucket.com/albums/r536/revotisThartmannIII/?action=view&current=thylacinepostcard.jpg

It seems to have been set up for a post card. It's a nice looking example for a taxidermy, the head seems well done, but I'd say it looks better in black and white, in colour you can see how discoloured and faded it is.
Back to top
View user's profile 
oldroverOffline
Great Old One
Joined: 18 Oct 2009
Total posts: 2289
Location: Wales
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 20-04-2013 17:59    Post subject: Reply with quote

Four thylacine pups which had been preserved in alcohol then lost have been discovered in a Prague museum. Don't know much else except that their discovery appears to be a result of work by the International Thylacine Database, as a paper on this subject was authored by its curator Stephen Sleightholme. Either way it's great news.
Back to top
View user's profile 
oldroverOffline
Great Old One
Joined: 18 Oct 2009
Total posts: 2289
Location: Wales
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 04-05-2013 12:14    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sad and sobering summary of O'Malley, Griffiths and Brown's thylacine investigations, even more disturbing for those who still hold out hope is that it was written in 1972.

http://eprints.utas.edu.au/14606/1/Thylacine_Griffith.pdf
Back to top
View user's profile 
Zilch5Offline
Vogon Poet
Joined: 08 Nov 2007
Total posts: 1579
Location: Western Sydney, Australia
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 08-10-2013 22:08    Post subject: Reply with quote

There was a short feature on the ABC news here recently - and a short summary of it is here on the net. Nothing much new though...

Quote:
Hunt continues for the Tasmanian Tiger

A scientist has raised the hopes of those who believe the Tasmanian tiger is still alive.


Tasmanian wildlife biologist Nick Mooney has written a chapter for a new book on thylacines, stating there is a slim chance they are still out there.

The thylacine had a bounty put on its head early last century and was declared extinct in the 1930s.

Mr Mooney says after decades studying and searching for the animal he cannot say it is definitely gone.

"I think there's enough opportunities in Tasmania for a very, very narrow chance that the animal's there," he said.

"It's probably gone, it just might be there."


http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-07/the-search-continues-for-the-tasmanian-tiger/5002406?section=tas
Back to top
View user's profile 
Pietro_Mercurios
Heuristically Challenged
Gender: Unknown
PostPosted: 11-11-2013 11:29    Post subject: Reply with quote

Possible fewmets of one of the Fortean's favourite questing beasts.
Quote:
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/nov/11/zoologists-on-the-hunt-for-tasmanian-tiger-declare-no-doubt-species-still-alive

Zoologists hunting Tasmanian tiger declare 'no doubt' species still alive

Team claims that it has 'highly credible' witnesses and has found animal faeces that could belong to the extinct thylacine

theguardian.com, Oliver Milman. 11 November 2013


It had been considered extinct for nearly 80 years, but the Tasmanian tiger has been declared alive and kicking by an intrepid group of British naturalists.

A team of investigators from the Centre for Fortean Zoology, which operates from a small farmhouse in north Devon, is currently in Tasmania hunting down clues to prove the thylacine, commonly known as the Tassie tiger, still exists.

The group claims to have gathered compelling evidence of the thylacine’s presence in remote parts of Tasmania’s north-west, despite the last known animal dying in Hobart Zoo on 7 September 1936.

The Centre for Fortean Zoology said it has talked to several “highly credible” witnesses of the thylacine and has found animal faeces that could belong to the beast. The droppings have been preserved in alcohol and are being sent awayfor DNA analysis.

The cryptozoologist team, which has previously attempted to find the yeti and boasts that has evidence of a mysterious Indonesian ape that walks on two legs, is one week into a fortnight-long trip to discover if the thylacine still exists.

Richard Freeman, zoological director of the organisation, told Guardian Australia he has “no doubt” the species still roams isolated areas of Tasmania.

“The area is so damn remote, there are so many prey species and we have so many reliable witnesses who know the bush that I’d say there is a reasonable population of them left,” he said. “I’d say there are more of them around in the world than Javan rhinos.” The World Wildlife Fund estimates that there are just 35 Javan rhinos left.

Freeman said he had spoken to a forestry worker who had seen an animal in daylight in 2011 which was distinctive because of its striped rear end, long stiff tail and “weird rolling motion, almost like a cow” when it walked.

A government wildlife marksman and several local people had spotted the same distinctive type of animal in recent years, Freeman said.

He admitted that no pawprints or dead thylacines have been found, attributing this to the sparse rocky ground of the region and the ferociousness of Tasmanian devils, which swiftly devour animal corpses when they discover them.

However, Freeman said he had heard reports of distinctive thylacine kills, where prey is effectively disembowelled, as well as the discovery of the droppings.

“If we get the DNA from them, that’ll be interesting,” he said. “They are far too big for a Tasmanian devil and it can’t be a dog. Why would a dog be so far out there? It’s a very remote area.

“We’ve been baiting and also setting up camera traps. We’ve seen a lot of devils and a feral cat, but nothing else so far. It’s only been up for a week, though, and it can take months. In the UK, we saw deer, otters and even a woman taking a pee on a bush before we saw anything interesting.”

The thylacine, which looked much like a striped, elongated dog, was zealously hunted by European settlers. They were trapped, snared, shot and poisoned, due to fears the animal would ravage sheep stocks.

Several attempts have been found to prove the animal still exists, although the Tasmanian government states that there is “no conclusive evidence” it lives on.

That won’t deter Freeman, who plans several return trips to prove mainstream science wrong.

“I’ll be coming back again and again,” he said. “The people who say they’ve seen it have nothing to gain and everything to lose. I’d say there is a population of at least 300 of them.”

But, don't get your hopes up.
Back to top
View user's profile 
oldroverOffline
Great Old One
Joined: 18 Oct 2009
Total posts: 2289
Location: Wales
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 11-11-2013 18:50    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lets see how the scat analysis goes, but no I won't be holding my breath.
Back to top
View user's profile 
lordmongroveOffline
Great Old One
Joined: 30 May 2009
Total posts: 951
Location: Exeter
Age: 44
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 03-12-2013 01:03    Post subject: Reply with quote

'Fewmets' a new favourate word!
Back to top
View user's profile 
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Fortean Times Message Board Forum Index -> Cryptozoology - mystery quadrupeds All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next
Page 6 of 8

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group