Forums

 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages 
The rich are different
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Fortean Times Message Board Forum Index -> The Human Condition
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
rynner
Location: Still above sea level
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 12-08-2008 08:53    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey, it's really tough being rich! Wink

Roman Abramovich snubbed by Italian restaurant
A restaurant manager has been hailed a local hero in Italy after he refused to provide a table to Roman Abramovich at his packed establishment at a Tuscan resort.
By Nick Pisa in Rome
Last Updated: 1:57AM BST 12 Aug 2008

David Vaiani, 36, told an assistant to the Russian billionaire owner of Chelsea Football Club that there was no way he could accommodate his party of eight because all the tables were fully booked. He suggested that Mr Abramovich try somewhere else.

But according to reports in the Italian media an infuriated Mr Abramovich decided he would not stop a minute longer in the resort of Forte dei Marmi and ordered the captain of his yacht to set off at "full steam ahead for Sardinia". Cool

The incident took place at the Bistrot restaurant in the resort, which has become a haven for Russian millionaires who are snapping up seaside villas all along the coast at vastly inflated prices, and has become a magnet to prostitutes who make a healthy living from them.

Forte dei Marmi's mayor, Umberto Buratti, told the Corriere Della Sera newspaper: "This news will please people who love Forte and we will happily give him the numbers of other restaurants.

"Bistrot did well to turn him down - rules count even in Forte, not just for citizens but for tourists even if they are wealthy ones."

Mr Abramovich's party is thought to have included his girlfriend Dario Zhukova, who was spotted last week shopping in the resort. According to Forbes magazine he is the world's 15th richest man with an $18.7 billion (£9.8 billion) fortune. He arrived in the town on board the third largest of his five yachts, the Grand Bleu. Shocked

[....]

Mr Abramovich was not the only wealthy celebrity to run up against Italian grit.

In Sardinia, the millionaire Flavio Briatore, a co-owner of QPR football club, was showered with wet sand thrown by tourists who objected to him landing a dinghy on a crowded beach.

While swimmers struggled to avoid the fast-moving boat as it roared through the crowded waters, people on the beach shouted: “Shame! Louts! Go home!”

Some people then filled buckets with water and sand to throw at the tycoon and his celebrity wife Elisabetta Gregoraci. Very Happy

The pair were in Sardinia to open a new restaurant and Mr Briatore later railed against the locals, saying: “I will close down everything. I pay my taxes. This is my right.”

“From north to south, the rebellion against those who show off their money and power is growing,” said the daily La Stampa.

Last week authorities fined the captain of a boat owned by Michael Douglas and Catherine Zeta-Jones £1,600 for not giving them the names of everybody on the vessel.


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/celebritynews/2541262/Roman-Abramovich-snubbed-by-Italian-restaurant.html
Back to top
View user's profile 
stunevilleOffline
Admin
Joined: 09 Mar 2002
Total posts: 10557
Location: FTMB HQ
Age: 47
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 12-08-2008 12:30    Post subject: Reply with quote

goth13girl666 wrote:
...us "common folk" middle class people have to work our arses off for what we want weather its 5 or 7 days of the week paying bills, food shopping and taking care of the family....
..and if you tell young people that today, they won't believe you.
theyithian wrote:
I wish people would start being a little more discerning in choosing between the terms 'drug use' and 'drug abuse'. [See article above] Clearly they are not synonyms, yet they seem to be regularly employed as such.
True - considering the concept of alcohol use vs abuse is pretty much universally understood you do have to wonder why.

I must say, I've met some startlingly rich people in my time. Some were gits, some were relatively normal, some so unassuming you'd never know they had more than two pennies to rub together. Take the money out of the equation, and they're just like the rest of society.

Generalisation is decidedly un-Fortean Smile.
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail 
goth13girl666Offline
Great Old One
Joined: 05 May 2008
Total posts: 438
Location: doncaster
Age: 29
Gender: Female
PostPosted: 12-08-2008 14:45    Post subject: Reply with quote

without the money yes they are like the rest of us they would have to go out to work, do jobs around the house, look after the family etc etc.

but they look down on us if we dont ahve 5 cars, 10 bedrooms, big swimming pools, and maids and butlers,
Back to top
View user's profile 
stunevilleOffline
Admin
Joined: 09 Mar 2002
Total posts: 10557
Location: FTMB HQ
Age: 47
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 12-08-2008 16:50    Post subject: Reply with quote

goth13girl666 wrote:
..but they look down on us if we dont ahve 5 cars, 10 bedrooms, big swimming pools, and maids and butlers,
That's the point I'm making though - actually, a lot of the wealthy don't look down on others. Some do, yes, but I think you'd find that many more don't give it any real thought at all.
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail 
goth13girl666Offline
Great Old One
Joined: 05 May 2008
Total posts: 438
Location: doncaster
Age: 29
Gender: Female
PostPosted: 19-08-2008 10:28    Post subject: Reply with quote

im not so sure i think they do look down on us, with the exception of maybe one or two, they have walked past me in shops andturn thier heads up or make little noises.

we are no different to them except we choose to do a days work instead of laying around in pools and on sunbeds or going on holiday every month.

i personally dont ahve a grip with rich people my only concern is that they should spend a day in our shoes to see what its like.
Back to top
View user's profile 
PeniGOffline
Proud children's writer
Joined: 31 Dec 2003
Total posts: 2990
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Age: 53
Gender: Female
PostPosted: 19-08-2008 13:32    Post subject: Reply with quote

You make me laugh, sweetie.

Remember back in the "nightmare playgrounds" thread, where you went on about how awful it was to take kids to those awful playgrounds, and I pointed out that a lot of them were only awful because of poor maintenance and that this probably meant they had a low tax base and were in poor neighborhoods and there simply wasn't any other place to take the kids?

You were the rich person there. Like the people you perceive as dissing you, you didn't put yourself into the other person's shoes, but assumed "normal and right" to match your situation. When the reality was pointed out to you, you saw it, but your response was still a little clueless. Yeah, people should vote to pay taxes to maintain their playgrounds, but if you have a poor tax district to begin with there may still not be enough money to go around.

I have been told I was "stuck up" (I in fact have the self-esteem of soggy toilet paper) by too many people to believe that our perceptions of other people's interior states is in any way reliable. I attended a private university for awhile and I learned there certain cultural traits of people who have more money than me:

1) They don't feel rich. (Nobody feels rich. This is why the pursuit of wealth is a mug's game and why the richest people are always moaning and whining and trying to wiggle out of taxes.)
2) They are no more likely to question the way they were raised than anybody else.
3) If they went to private school, their practical education is shockingly bad and their academic performance isn't as much better than the products of the "advanced" track of a public school as everyone expects.
4) They are under a lot of pressure to behave in ways and to have things that seem silly to those outside their culture, and this pressure creates just as much stress as the pressures lower-income people have.
5) They don't like being stereotyped any more than anybody else.
6) They don't mean any more harm than anybody else.
7) They don't mean any less harm, either.

Judge not, lest ye be judged.
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website 
goth13girl666Offline
Great Old One
Joined: 05 May 2008
Total posts: 438
Location: doncaster
Age: 29
Gender: Female
PostPosted: 19-08-2008 14:02    Post subject: Reply with quote

well im glad i make you laugh!

as i said i said about these through run ins i have had with rich people i never said all were like that everyone has a different opinion right?
Back to top
View user's profile 
PeniGOffline
Proud children's writer
Joined: 31 Dec 2003
Total posts: 2990
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Age: 53
Gender: Female
PostPosted: 19-08-2008 16:58    Post subject: Reply with quote

goth13girl666 wrote:
i never said all were like that


Oh, you did too. Reread your own post as if it were written by a stranger, learn about yourself, and move on. We all have biases. The difference between the bigot and the tolerant person is degree of self-knowledge, which permits us to limit and correct the ways our biases manifest. I'm as biased against rich people as the next person, but since I probably look pretty rich to the illegal immigrants next door, I try to be discreet about it.

When any of us behave badly, the tendency will be to behave badly in the ways society makes easy. So, people from certain income brackets or ethnic backgrounds will drift into certain manifestations of their basic human flaws more often than into others. If you're rich enough, it's hard to be good because it's so easy to get away with stuff. If you're poor enough, it's hard to be good because it's so easy to be blamed.

But we can all be snobs; and we can all project our own sense of inferiority onto the people who have what we desire and blame them for making us feel bad, when we're really doing it to ourselves; and we can all derive pleasure from hunting out the motes in the eyes of others while ignoring the beams in our own.
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website 
JamesWhiteheadOffline
Piffle Prospector
Joined: 02 Aug 2001
Total posts: 6273
Location: Manchester, UK
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 30-08-2008 20:07    Post subject: Reply with quote

A gem of a post but let's move on . . .

Dead horses? Dead dogs? The belief by a neighbour that big businesses can't be to blame. A friend's barbecue and then their own. "An ordinary everyday chap, well-dressed, a good businessman" according to a neighbour yet "not to be trusted" and "bereft of the basic instincts of commercial morality" according to a judge. Better to lose self and family than a house? Just different? Time will tell. RIP.

Guardian Story

Two bodies found at millionaire's burned-out home

Search for a third body continues at businessman Christopher Foster's house in Shropshire

James Sturcke and agencies

guardian.co.uk,

Saturday August 30 2008 10:40 BST

Two bodies have been found in the burned-out home of millionaire businessman Christopher Foster, police said today.

Foster, his wife Jill and their 15-year-old daughter Kirstie have been missing since a blaze gutted the house in the early hours of Tuesday.

West Mercia police said two bodies were found in the main part of Osbaston House, Maesbrook, Shropshire.

Superintendent Gary Higgins said: "We can confirm that two bodies were recovered last night from the main part of Osbaston House, Maesbrook.

"The remains will be examined by a Home Office pathologist and post mortems are due to be carried out later today to establish the cause of death."

He said it was not possible to give further details. The Shropshire coroner has been informed.

Officers entered the main part of the building yesterday morning but were forced to withdraw "almost immediately" after debris began to fall.

They left the building for their own safety, but were able to re-enter in the afternoon following more work to shore up the structure.

The search for a third body will continue today.

Higgins said it could take several weeks to complete the examination and sifting of debris inside the building.

"It is going to be a painstaking and lengthy process before the full examination of the house and its surrounds is completed," he said.

"In the meantime, we will keep an open mind concerning what we may, or may not find."

Police said the premises were deliberately set alight.

The Fosters went to a friend's barbecue on Monday before returning to their home later that evening.

It has been reported that Kirstie may have been talking online to friends at around 1am on Tuesday when her conversation abruptly stopped, possibly by a powercut. The fire took hold shortly after, destroying a stable block, garage and badly damaging the house itself.

A spokeswoman for West Mercia constabulary said police were looking at Kirstie's computer.

Police have refused to comment on reports that bullet cartridges and pools of blood were found in the courtyard.

A man who knew Foster said he feared his former business associate may have "just flipped" under pressure.

Terence Baines, a former director of Foster's company Ulva Ltd, said: "It's anyone's guess, but it seems that the people he owed money to are big companies and I can't see them behind something like this."

"He was just an ordinary everyday chap, well-dressed, a good businessman," Baines said.

Two horses found dead at the scene have been examined and police are awaiting the results.

Detectives confirmed the bodies of three dogs were found close to the horses and said a large horse box parked close to the gates of the property had been removed for forensic examination.

Ulva Ltd, which supplied insulated pipes to the offshore oil industry, had made Foster wealthy while he was in his 20s.

Neighbours said he enjoyed the multi-millionaire's lifestyle after moving into the £1.2m house four years ago, driving Porsches and Aston Martins, buying horses for his wife and daughter, and educating Kirstie at Ellesmere College, a £14,000-a-year private school in Shropshire.

It is now clear that Foster had been facing financial pressure after the collapse of his business and may have feared that his creditors were about to seize the property.

By the middle of last year the business was alleged to owe suppliers £1m and the Inland Revenue a further £800,000. Foster launched another company, Ulva International, but an appeal court judge ruled that he had conducted "an asset stripping exercise" so that he could continue trading.

The judge added that Foster "was not to be trusted" and "bereft of the basic instincts of commercial morality".

Administrators were appointed for the business on August 14 last year, but on September 26 Birmingham high court ordered that the company be wound up and liquidators be appointed.

It appears that the liquidators were able to prevent Foster from selling or remortgaging his home, as Land Registry records show that a court order was obtained in October last year making clear that "no deposition by the proprietor of the registered estate is to be registered except under a further order".

The liquidators obtained an interim charge on the property in May and Foster may have feared that his family were about to lose their home.

The administrators referred calls to West Mercia police and the liquidator declined to comment.
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website 
KondoruOffline
Unfeathered Biped
Joined: 05 Dec 2003
Total posts: 6063
Gender: Unknown
PostPosted: 31-08-2008 10:06    Post subject: Reply with quote

but family annialation can happen in any household.

its just not so newsworthy when they are poor.
Back to top
View user's profile 
MythopoeikaOffline
Joined: 18 Sep 2001
Total posts: 10662
Gender: Unknown
PostPosted: 31-08-2008 13:27    Post subject: Reply with quote

I do not begrudge rich people their wealth if they have obtained it through hard work and risk-taking.
I have met plenty of very wealthy people, most of them self-made millionaires - and I have found them to be people who have worked extremely hard, used their brains etc.
I think that anybody who is jealous of their success should try and set up a business themselves, just to see how much hard work it is. I know how hard it is myself, because I did it once.
We all have the potential to get that rich too.
Look at guys like Duncan Bannatyne and Alan Sugar - both of them were poor at some point before their businesses became successful and made them rich.
Another thing - rich people keep a lot of other people in gainful employment. If there were no rich people, we'd all be in trouble economically.
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner
Location: Still above sea level
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 07-10-2008 08:28    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mythopoeika wrote:
Another thing - rich people keep a lot of other people in gainful employment. If there were no rich people, we'd all be in trouble economically.

Well, you were writing in August! Wink

Now if all these rich people paid their taxes, we would be better off...


Test case for non-dom Robert Gaines-Cooper
Frances Gibb, Legal Editor

A wealthy entrepreneur who was hit with a multimillion-pound tax bill after being stripped of his non-domiciled status has begun a High Court test case that could have big implications for “non-doms”.

Robert Gaines-Cooper insists that he has not been “ordinarily resident” in Britain since the mid-1970s, although he has a multimillion-pound house in Henley-on-Thames - home to his collection of paintings, classic cars and guns. Revenue & Customs say that his roots remain in England so he should pay tax.

Mr Gaines-Cooper, who is in his seventies, said that he had kept strictly to the Revenue's demands that tax exiles can spend no more than 91 days a year in Britain. In a test case over non-domiciled status, which is generally enjoyed only by the extremely wealthy, he says that the Revenue's refusal to accept him as a non-UK resident is “unfair, inconsistent and discriminatory”.

Revenue & Customs is adamant that, despite his years of travelling in search of business opportunities, his true roots are in England and that - at least for tax purposes - he “never left” this country.

Mr Gaines-Cooper began a successful jukebox business venture in England in 1958 and has set up companies in Canada, the US, Italy, Singapore, Jersey, Cyprus and the Seychelles, including a highly successful concern that produces laryngeal masks. He said that he “made a break” with Britain in 1976 - only spending about 50 days a year in England over the next three years - and that his home has long been a luxury house in the Seychelles - Plantation Bois Noir - that he bought in 1975.

Ingrid Simler, QC, for the Revenue, told the court: “What one has to look for is his strongest connection; it has always been in England. He didn't break his domicile.”

However, David Milne, QC, for Mr Gaines-Cooper, said that his client had “long left” England by the time of the tax years in issue (1993 to 2004) and, as he was encouraged to do by the Revenue, “very carefully calculated” the number of days that he spent in this country.

After a two-day hearing, Mr Justice Lloyd Jones reserved judgment.

http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/business/law/article4894516.ece
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner
Location: Still above sea level
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 07-10-2008 08:52    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another rich man in the firing line...

'Your company is bankrupt, you keep $480m. Is that fair?'
Andrew Clark in New York and Elana Schor in Washington
The Guardian, Tuesday October 7 2008

It was a showdown to cherish for critics of Wall Street's culture of enrichment. The grim-faced boss of the bankrupt bank Lehman Brothers was left squirming yesterday as a veteran Democrat roasted him over his multimillion-dollar pay.

With the startled look of a man unaccustomed to sharp examination, Lehman chief executive Richard Fuld clashed bluntly with the chairman of the House oversight committee, Henry Waxman, on Capitol Hill.

Called on to explain why Lehman collapsed last month, Fuld began with a note of humility, saying he felt "horrible" over the demise of the 158-year-old institution. "I want to be very clear," Fuld said. "I take full responsibility for the decisions I made and for the actions I took."

In a brief speech which was heard in silence, Fuld told legislators that if he could turn back the clock he would do many things differently. As soon as he finished speaking, sparks began to fly.

The chairman of the committee held up a chart suggesting that Fuld's personal remuneration totalled $480m (£276m) over eight years, including payouts of $91m in 2001 and $89m in 2005.

"Your company is now bankrupt and our country is in a state of crisis," said Waxman, a liberal from California. "You get to keep $480m. I have a very basic question: Is that fair?"

After a long pause, Fuld said the figure was exaggerated: "The majority of my compensation, sir, came in stock. The vast majority of the stock I got I still owned at the point of our [bankruptcy] filing."

Waxman cut him off, saying that even if the figure was slightly lower, it was "unimaginable" to much of the public. "Is that fair, for a CEO of a company that's now bankrupt, to make that kind of money? It's just unimaginable to so many people."

"I would say to you the $500m number is not accurate," said Fuld. "I'd say to you, although it's still a large number, for the years you're talking about here, my cash compensation was close to $60m, which you've indicated here, and I took out closer to $250m [in shares]."

Interrupting again, Waxman listed Fuld's collection of property, including a $14m ocean-front villa in Florida and a home in an exclusive ski resort.

"You and your wife have an art collection filled with million dollar paintings," Waxman said. "Your former president, Joe Gregory, used to travel to work in a helicopter."

A pugnacious congressman with a bald head and military moustache, Waxman warmed to his theme: "You made all this money taking risks with other people's money."


Refusing to give ground, Fuld said his pay had been set by an independent compensation committee which spent "a tremendous amount of time" making sure executives' interests were aligned with those of shareholders.

"When the company did well, we did well," Fuld said. "When the company did not do well, we didn't do well."

Waxman disagreed: "Mr Fuld, there seems to be a breakdown, because you did very well when the company was doing well and you did well when the company was not doing well. And now your shareholders who owned your company have nothing. They've been wiped out."

Fuld's evidence was his first public appearance since Lehman failed, sparking a chain of events which has sent shockwaves through the global financial system and prompted the US government to begin a $700bn bail-out of the banking sector.

A lifelong Lehman employee who joined the firm as an intern in 1966, Fuld has been blamed for the debacle by many of the bank's 28,000 staff - including those in London who have accused senior management of filleting Lehman's British operation of money in the bank's final days.

Deadpan and emotionless, Fuld repeatedly frustrated congressmen by answering questions with lengthy, technical financial explanations.

Frustrated by his demeanour, a Republican congressman, John Mica, tried humour: "If you haven't discovered your role, you're the villain today. You've got to act like a villain." Twisted Evil

Fuld stared back wordlessly, without a shadow of a smile.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2008/oct/07/lehmanbrothers.banking
Back to top
View user's profile 
rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
Joined: 13 Dec 2008
Total posts: 25739
Location: Under the moon
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 24-04-2010 18:53    Post subject: Reply with quote

Super-rich become wealthier again, Sunday Times says

The UK's super-rich have seen a resurgence in their fortunes, the Sunday Times Rich List suggests.

London-based steel tycoon Lakshmi Mittal topped the list for the sixth consecutive year with a £22.45bn pile.

Many, including Mr Mittal, were hit badly by the economic downturn, shrinking their wealth in 2009.

But the collective fortunes of the top 1,000 on the list have risen by 30% in the past year - the biggest jump in the list's 22-year history - to £333.5bn.

Last year the top 1,000 saw their fortunes decrease by about £155bn - to £258bn - and the number of billionaires fell from 75 to 43. This time, it has risen by 10 to 53.

Mr Mittal, who owns Arcelor Mittal, saw his fortune double from £10.8bn to £22.45bn as the global steel industry recovered from the economic decline.

Russian oligarch and Chelsea Football Club owner Roman Abramovich remains at second place with a £7.4bn fortune thanks to a 6% increase of £400m.

Third place again remains stable, with the Duke of Westminster's wealth increasing by £250m to £6.75bn. The British-born billionaire's money comes mainly from property.

Although retail giant Sir Philip Green and his wife Lady Christina Green saw their riches increase from £3.83bn to £4.10bn, they dropped in the rankings from sixth place to ninth.

But Indian-born Anil Agarwal was the highest climber. He moved 60 places up to 10th position thanks to the rising share prices of mining group Vedanta Resources.

His wealth jumped a staggering 583% from £600m to £4.1bn.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/8642021.stm

The fact that some people's wealth can increase in one year by more than I have ever earned or owned in my entire life is mind-boggling...
Back to top
View user's profile 
jubecrewOffline
John Carter of Mars
Joined: 08 Jun 2009
Total posts: 228
Location: Bacolod City, Phillipines
Age: 31
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 24-04-2010 22:16    Post subject: Reply with quote

all I can say is, it sure would be nice to be rich and not have to worry about material things and how to get them

then again it sure would be nice to be dirt poor and not ever think of the things that you lack but the things that you have

I think life would be alot easier if you were rich, however if you became rich from rich family what have you, it sure would blend the lines between what is right and wrong, morally and personally how would you find a real friend when most friends would have some sort of personal gain to befriend you

The richest persons in the world are those with no real pride on material things, most buddists would agree

I walk through streets where people have shacks and shantys put up, who don't own much and barely have a pot to piss in yet still are very happy to say hello Very Happy

I have met a few rich people as well, who have had attitudes but I say, who could blame someone who has been given everything not to expect any less from the rest of society Razz
Back to top
View user's profile 
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Fortean Times Message Board Forum Index -> The Human Condition All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
Page 3 of 5

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group