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Beards and Moustaches
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CarlosTheDJOffline
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PostPosted: 30-03-2008 17:19    Post subject: Reply with quote

My beard will be with me for a long time....I look like an egg without it.
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SpookdaddyOffline
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PostPosted: 30-03-2008 17:25    Post subject: Reply with quote

CarlosTheDJ wrote:
My beard will be with me for a long time....I look like an egg without it.


First we had snails with beards - now eggs. This is starting to make me feel bilious.

Mind you, I do occasionally work with a bloke who looks like a beard with a beard - looks like he's been swept off the floor of a hairdressers at the end of a very, very busy day!!.
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rynner
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PostPosted: 12-06-2008 20:56    Post subject: Reply with quote

RAF pilot wins moustache battle

An RAF fighter pilot has won his battle with the United States Air Force over the size of his handlebar moustache.

Flt Lt Chris Ball, who is on an exchange posting with the USAF in Afghanistan was told to trim his moustache.

The pilot, who is usually based at RAF Lossiemouth, turned to the Queen's Regulations and found the moustache's width did not breach RAF guidelines.

The rules state the moustache should not go below the edge of the mouth.

Despite Flt Lt Ball serving on exchange with the USAF, the RAF still have some say on the attire and appearance of their staff.

The USAF relented and Flt Lt Ball's moustache was left unruffled.

An MoD spokeswoman said: "Queen's Regulations for the RAF (QR209) state that if a moustache is worn, the upper lip is to be unshaven and the moustache is not to extend below the edge of the mouth.

"The commanding officer shall be the arbiter as to what is or not an acceptable style or length of cut.

"A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) exists covering the exchange of Officers of the Royal Air Force and the United States Air Force.

"The MOU states that 'Officers are to comply with the dress regulations of their own Service and the order of dress for any occasion is to be that which most nearly conforms to the order of dress of the unit with which they are serving.

"Local commanding officers should not issue instructions to officers which cannot be fulfilled by reasons of difference in dress regulations."

'Big and bushy'

Moustache aficionados were delighted that Flt Lt Ball could continue to sport his facial hair.

Rod Littlewood, vice president of the London-based Handlebar Club, said the RAF had a long association with the moustache.

"We are delighted with this result, it's one in the eye for these people - a moustache is all about individuality," he said.

"One theory behind the association between airmen and a hairy top lip was to make young pilots look older."

He added: "During the Second World War a lot of these chaps signing up to fly were pretty young.

"A moustache would certainly make them look a lot older and more manly."

Mr Littlewood, who supports a large handlebar moustache, said: "The moustache is not that popular in the UK at the moment but as far as we are concerned they have never gone out of fashion.

"Everything goes around in circles and I don't see any reason why they shouldn't become more popular.

"Of course the handlebar is the most sought after - it's big and bushy and swishes across the top of the lip."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/7451939.stm

Very Happy
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escargot1Offline
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PostPosted: 13-06-2008 03:54    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yup, I remember a magazine cartoon from about 30 years ago, depicting an interview panel of identically-mustachio'd pilots facing a similarly-adorned canditate, with a caption something like 'We think you'll fit in well here!' Laughing
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rynner
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PostPosted: 29-06-2008 06:22    Post subject: Reply with quote

Didn't think it worth starting a new thread for Stubble, so this goes in here!

Women prefer men with stubble for love, sex and marriage
By Roger Dobson
Last Updated: 12:01am BST 29/06/2008

Stubble is the way to win a woman’s heart, a study has shown. Researchers found that women are more attracted to men with stubbly chins than those with clean-shaven faces or full beards.

Women participating in the research rated men with stubble as tough, mature, aggressive, dominant and masculine - and as the best romantic partners, either for a fling or a long-term relationships.

The findings of the experiment, carried out on British women aged 18 to 44, could explain the appeal of actors such as George Clooney and Brad Pitt who cultivate their unshaven look.

The explanation for the preference is not clear, but experts in human evolution say that that facial hair may be a signal of aggression because it boosts the apparent size of the lower jaw, emphasising the teeth as weapons.

Psychologists at Northumbria University who carried out the new study believe that stubbly men may offer women the best worlds - not too strongly masculine, but mature and with the potential to grow a full beard.

The researchers carried out the study using computer technology to alter pictures of 15 men’s faces so that they displayed different degrees of hairiness. Five levels of facial hair were used - clean-shaven, light stubble, heavy stubble, light beard and full beard.

advertisementThe pictures were shown to 76 women who were asked to rate them for masculinity, aggression, dominance, attractiveness, age, and social maturity. They were also asked how desirable each man would be as a short-term or long-term partner. Faces with full beards were judged to be the most masculine, aggressive and socially mature. They were also thought to look five years older.

They were rated the least attractive and the worst choice for a short-term relationship. Men with light beards were considered the most dominant. Those with light stubble were rated the most attractive and as the ideal romantic partner for the short or long term. Clean-shaven men finished bottom for masculinity, dominance, aggression, and social maturity, and they were the least favoured choice as a long-term partner. They came second-to-last for attractiveness.

Writing in the journal Personality and Individual Differences, the researchers conclude: “Facial hair, or beardedness, is a powerful sociosexual signal, and an obvious biological marker of sexual maturity.

"Facial hair may have been sexually selected by females on the basis of associated male success, despite its threatening appearance. Clean-shaven faces therefore may suggest appeasement, as well as being an obvious sign of sexual immaturity.

"Increasing levels of facial hair were associated with increased perceptions of aggression, in that bearded faces were perceived as being the most aggressive, whilst clean-shaven faces were rated as being the least aggressive. And as facial hair increased in a linear fashion, so did female ratings of masculinity and dominance.

"In desirability for a short-term relationship, a female preference for male faces with stubble or light beard was found, with clean-shaven and fully bearded faces being the least preferred. This indicates that females are not selecting faces displaying relatively high or low masculinity, but are rather preferring males who are clearly mature - post-pubertal - but not too masculinised. The same pattern was found for preferences for a long-term relationship."

The researchers now want to extend their study internationally. Dr Nick Neave, who carried out the study with Kerry Shields, said: "There are large cultural differences in perceptions of facial hair, and we are hoping to expand on this research by conducting a large-scale study assessing female perceptions of male facial hair in different in as many countries as possible."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/main.jhtml?xml=/earth/2008/06/29/scistubble129.xml
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rynner
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PostPosted: 06-10-2008 07:04    Post subject: Reply with quote

The moustache - victim of fickle public taste
What do Peter Mandelson and Sir Ian Blair have in common?

By Gerald Warner
Last Updated: 12:22AM BST 05 Oct 2008

Both formerly sported moustaches but have discarded them – to better career advantage in Mandelson's case than in Blair's. Besides Mandelson, Geoff Hoon and Stephen Byers are also recovering moustache-wearers in New Labour's ranks.

Moustaches have had a mixed history. In Germany, Bismarck's walrus soup-strainer concealed successful statecraft, whereas Kaiser Wilhelm II's ferociously upturned moustache presaged defeat. Hitler wore a long, waxed moustache in the First World War but was ordered to trim it to fit his gas-mask and so replaced it with the minimalist Charlie Chaplin toothbrush that apparently lent him gravitas (go figure!). Stalin and Saddam Hussein further damaged the image of the moustache.

In the 1930s to 1950s the pencil moustache denoted the cad, despite the heroic examples of Ronald Colman and Clark Gable. The 1970s saw the Zapata moustache being sported by leftie students and academics: its drooping corners had the advantage of imparting a sullen expression. Moustaches enjoyed a final fling in the 1980s, but are now severely out of fashion. In a recent poll, a majority of American women said they would refuse to kiss a man with a moustache.

The governing body – the Royal Academy, as it were – of the moustache in Britain is the Handlebar Club, which meets on the first Friday of every month at the Windsor Castle pub in London. Membership is open to anyone with "a hirsute appendage of the upper lip, with graspable extremities".

Beards automatically disqualify but there is no ban on female membership. The club was founded by Jimmy Edwards in 1947. Its president has featured in the Guinness Book of Records for his 60-inch handlebar; but even that is puny compared to Bajansinh Juwansinh Gurjar, of India, whose 12-feet-six-inches moustache is the longest in the world.

Moustache-wearers boast an equivalent event to the Olympics: the biennial World Beard and Moustache championships. There are six competitive categories of moustache: Natural, English, Dali, Imperial, Hungarian and Freestyle. At last year's championships, embarrassingly, the English category was won by a German. Shocked

Last August a rumour spread that David Miliband was growing a moustache. This appeared to have no firmer roots than a particularly aggressive streak of five o'clock shadow across his upper lip. Such a move would probably be unwise. Public taste is fickle and, at least for the time being, seems to have turned against moustaches on public figures.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/3135233/The-moustache---victim-of-fickle-public-taste.html
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rynner2Online
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PostPosted: 15-12-2008 08:15    Post subject: Reply with quote

Prince William grows a beard
Prince William has grown a beard during his last weeks of freedom before he begins pilot training with the RAF.

By Anita Singh, Showbusiness Editor
Last Updated: 7:20PM GMT 14 Dec 2008

The 26-year-old Prince grew the facial hair during a recent 10-day exercise in Barbados with the Navy's Special Boat Service.

He returned a week ago but appears so enamoured of his new look that he has yet to shave it off.

He was photographed on a pheasant shoot at the Queen's Sandringham estate in Norfolk with his brother, Prince Harry, and girlfriend Kate Middleton.

Rules on facial hair in the Armed Forces differ according to the service. The Royal Navy allows a full beard - although no moustaches, goatees or 'designer stubble' - if permission is sought from a commanding officer.

It is believed that the Prince's beard was an attempt to disguise his identity during the SBS mission. He is also following family tradition, as the Prince of Wales grew a beard while on Naval exercises in Alaska in 1975.

However, beards are banned in the RAF and the Prince must be clean-shaven when he reports for duty next month to commence an 18-month training course to qualify as a search and rescue pilot.

While the Prince's new look may divide opinion, his decision to take part in a pheasant shoot also proved controversial.

The League Against Cruel Sports accused the young royals of "setting a bad example".

A spokesman said: "We feel sorry for Miss Middleton. We got the impression that she didn't like bloodsports. The royals appear to use shooting as some sort of induction ceremony."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/theroyalfamily/3759482/Prince-William-grows-a-beard.html
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rynner2Online
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PostPosted: 31-12-2008 14:35    Post subject: Reply with quote

India moustaches 'face the chop'

The famous beards and moustaches of India - seen as representing a huge tradition to the outside world - are under threat, a new book says.

It says that the country's famous facial hairs are disappearing as India enters the clean-shaven digital age.

The book says that the traditional belief that facial hair is a sign of virility appears to be facing the chop.

It says that young people in particular do not want an itchy moustache or beard which they think makes them look old.

"Hair India - A Guide to the Bizarre Beards and Magnificent Moustaches of Hindustan" says that India's extravagant beards and moustaches - proudly sported by generations of Indian men - are being trimmed as the country becomes more clean-shaven and urban.

Author Richard McCallum says that clean chins are becoming more commonplace among younger people who no longer have role models sporting beards or moustaches.

He points out that most well-known Indian cricket players no longer have facial hair, while many in Bollywood have opted instead for token designer stubble.

Mr McCallum spent several months travelling the length and breadth of the country to find the bushiest beards and most magisterial moustaches before they disappeared forever.

"It was an idea that started out as a bit of fun but turned into a labour of love," Mr McCallum, a British travel business operator, told the AFP news agency.

"Beards and moustaches tell the story of modern India - how it is becoming a more Westernised, homogenised place, but also how the great traditions and the love of display still exist.

"Male grooming is important to Indians, and facial hair proved a topic that took us to places and into conversations with people we would never have met otherwise."

The book categorises beards according to bristle-design. There is the "the chin strap", "the soup strainer", "the wing commander" and "the walrus".

What is claimed to be the world's longest beard, measuring 1.6 metres (six ft) and the world's longest moustache also feature in the book.

But the emphasis is on ordinary stall-owners and rickshaw drivers displaying moustaches and beards that are cut, dyed, waxed and preened in various shapes and sizes.

"Some people were confused when we first told them why we wanted to take their picture, but they soon became very keen," said photographer Chris Stowers.

While facial hair will always be proudly displayed by Sikhs, for whom "kesh" (uncut hair) is a religious principle, it seems that among sectors of society it is inexorably falling out of favour.

One of the few professions where it remains a mandatory requirement is among doormen of five-star hotels.

"Young people don't want an itchy moustache or beard which they think makes them look old," Lalan Singh, 40, a restaurant doorman in Delhi's Connaught Place told AFP.

He is the proud owner of a handlebar moustache that took three years to grow. He could be one of the last of his kind.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/7806039.stm

"Itchy moustache or beard"?? There are other parts of my body that are itchier! And generally speaking a beard feels furry rather than bristly when up close and personal - which you can't say for 'designer stubble'!
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rynner2Online
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PostPosted: 19-08-2009 08:33    Post subject: Reply with quote

Queen's Freddie Mercury wins top spot in celebrity moustache poll
Queen's Freddie Mercury was the owner of Britain's Greatest Ever Moustache, a survey of the top 10 has revealed.
Published: 7:00AM BST 19 Aug 2009

The band frontman's trademark lip furniture beat John Cleese's tache in Fawlty Towers to claim the title.

In third place was the facial favourite of former Secretary of State for War Lord Kitchener who famously issued the famous World War One "Britain Wants You" rallying call.

Moustache popularity was at an all-time high in the 19th century – and rumour has it Kitchener wore his handlebar moustache to hide emotions and maintain a "stiff upper lip".

In fourth place was legendary comic actor and film maker Charlie Chaplain's short dark tache, followed by former England keeper David Seaman in fifth place.

The poll of 3,000 men was carried out by Remington to support the Everyman Male Cancer Campaign's Tacheback initiative which raises funds to tackle testicular and prostate cancers.

"Freddie Mercury has topped the charts once again by taking first place in this poll," Nikki McReynolds of Remington said.

"Freddie was obviously proud of his facial hair as he once announced mid concert 'it's my moustache and I'm going to keep it'.

"The sporting of a moustache is a bold statement in this day and age – but with our Tacheback initiative we want to encourage Brits to 'grow a tache and raise cash' for testicular and prostate cancers – which affects 36,000 men in the UK every year."

Information about how to join Tacheback and persuade family and friends to sponsor your change of image can be found here.

Sixth place in the poll went to Bruce Forsyth, for his groomed white-grey moustache and in seventh place was English comic actor Terry Thomas, who also sported an impressive gap in his front teeth.

Peter Sellers, who played Inspector Clouseau in the Pink Panther films, took eighth place in the survey while sporting legends Des Lynam and Daley Thompson complete the top 10.

GREAT BRITISH TACHE – TOP 10

1. Freddie Mercury 2. John Cleese 3. Lord Kitchener 4. Charlie Chaplin 5. David Seaman 6. Bruce Forsyth 7. Terry Thomas 8. Peter Sellers 9. Des Lynam 10. Daley Thompson

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/6051786/Queens-Freddie-Mercury-wins-top-spot-in-celebrity-moustache-poll.html

(Nice to see Terry Thomas in there! Cool )
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rynner2Online
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PostPosted: 21-05-2010 08:29    Post subject: Reply with quote

Beardism strikes Japan! Shocked

Japanese bureaucrats face up to the clean-cut look
Isesaki authorities order staff to shave off beards and moustaches after complaints from public
Justin McCurry in Tokyo guardian.co.uk, Thursday 20 May 2010 13.05 BST

In feudal Japan, a beard was considered a symbol of power or a declaration of belligerent intent but bureaucrats in one town could find themselves sent to the bathroom, razor in hand, for sporting even the suggestion of a five o'clock shadow.

Authorities in Isesaki, Gunma prefecture, have ordered all male employees to shave off their facial hair, and banish all thoughts of growing any, following complaints from members of the public who said they found dealing with bearded bureaucrats "unpleasant".

The ban, the first of its kind among Japanese public officials, applies to any manifestation of facial hair, from lovingly cultivated full beards to trendy goatees and designer stubble.

The only acceptable public face of Isesaki, the local government said, is a clean-shaven one. "Some citizens find bearded men unpleasant, so beards are banned," an in-house notice warned this week. Rolling Eyes

The notice acknowledges the growing popularity of facial hair among Japanese men, encouraged by sportsmen and celebrities, but insists that "public servants should look like public servants".

The ban was introduced this week to coincide with the start of Cool Biz, a summer campaign now in its sixth year that allows male staff to work without jackets and ties to cut down on air-conditioning and help tackle climate change.

The Isesaki ban is reminiscent of the strict rules on physical appearance enforced by conservative companies in the postwar period in the belief that Japan's rise to economic superpower required absolute conformity.

But this was the first time that an absence of whiskers had been enforced among civil servants, the internal affairs and communications ministry said.

Bearded Japanese men sniffed at the town government's belief that a workforce of smooth-chinned bureaucrats would "improve decorum".

"I am designing beards for my customers that are considered acceptable in the company workplace," Minoru Fujii, a member of Hige [beard] Club, a Tokyo beard advocacy group comprising mainly barbers, told Kyodo News. He added that there was little he could do to help the put-upon penpushers of Isesaki.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/may/20/japan-isesaki-beard-ban
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shruggy63Offline
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PostPosted: 08-09-2010 02:06    Post subject: Beards Reply with quote

In recent times I've grown a full, untamed beard. I live in an area of England where having a full beard may be more than just a fashion statement! In fact I've seen extra respect given to me in supermarket queues by veiled women.
But as someone who's had a modern UK university education, taking on board Feminist theory, I'm really uncomfortable with it.
It's nothing to do with sexual liaisons, it's just odd that another human bean would be submissive to an atheist simply cos of appearance?
You can't go into a discussion of your values & explain in a supermarket queue, so how does one communicate?
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EnolaGaiaOffline
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PostPosted: 08-09-2010 04:11    Post subject: Reply with quote

Others' reactions are 'on them', not you ... Why are you obsessing over others' responses to the point you're second-guessing your apparent personal preference?

I've had a beard (less moustache) for about 25 years now. Some of the responses I've received are odd, others are irritating, and none of them matter a whit to me ...

With both my remaining hair and the beard being white, I get a lot of unexpectedly respectful reactions. I take particularly smug pleasure in young punks holding a door for me. Twisted Evil

Only a few days ago an obsessively chatty manager at a restaurant asked if I weren't a long way from home. In response to my blank stare he explained, "You know - the North Pole."

I answered, "I'm nowhere near as jolly in the off-season ... Beware ..." to shut him up and set off chuckles among his embarrassed underlings. Cool

Another of my experiences might be closer to the situation you describe ... Some years ago I was involved with a woman of Mennonite ancestry. Her family was 'suburban Mennonite' (car rather than buggy, factory rather than farm, etc.), and she dressed in a modestly fashionable modern style. Whenever we'd shop at the local (old-school Mennonite) farmers market, the crowd of traditional folks consistently assumed I was a 'brother' and she was 'the English' based on my beard style versus her garb.

I found it entertaining and advantageous rather than unsettling, though I'm not sure what I liked best - the fascinatingly open conversations with the traditional folk, the insider discount deals, or the way it always peeved my lady friend. Wink
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CarlosTheDJOffline
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PostPosted: 08-09-2010 06:55    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a small beard, one may call it a goatee.....otherwise I may be confused with a golf ball or an egg.
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stunevilleOffline
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PostPosted: 08-09-2010 07:01    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've got a week's worth of salt-and-pepper stubble at the moment, owing to shaving rash. I had a full beard years ago, along with long hair, but last time a tried growing one properly it just made me look like a grumpy badger.

PS Face fuzz threads merged.
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PostPosted: 08-09-2010 07:12    Post subject: Reply with quote

London gay men like beards - real ones, not the pretend girlfriend type - or so I'm told. Laughing
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