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Theories of Everything
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rynner
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PostPosted: 15-11-2007 07:38    Post subject: Theories of Everything Reply with quote

Surfer dude stuns physicists with theory of everything
By Roger Highfield, Science Editor
Last Updated: 6:01pm GMT 14/11/2007

An impoverished surfer has drawn up a new theory of the universe, seen by some as the Holy Grail of physics, which as received rave reviews from scientists.

Garrett Lisi, 39, has a doctorate but no university affiliation and spends most of the year surfing in Hawaii, where he has also been a hiking guide and bridge builder (when he slept in a jungle yurt).

In winter, he heads to the mountains near Lake Tahoe, Nevada, where he snowboards. "Being poor sucks," Lisi says. "It's hard to figure out the secrets of the universe when you're trying to figure out where you and your girlfriend are going to sleep next month."

Despite this unusual career path, his proposal is remarkable because, by the arcane standards of particle physics, it does not require highly complex mathematics.

Even better, it does not require more than one dimension of time and three of space, when some rival theories need ten or even more spatial dimensions and other bizarre concepts. And it may even be possible to test his theory, which predicts a host of new particles, perhaps even using the new Large Hadron Collider atom smasher that will go into action near Geneva next year.

Although the work of 39 year old Garrett Lisi still has a way to go to convince the establishment, let alone match the achievements of Albert Einstein, the two do have one thing in common: Einstein also began his great adventure in theoretical physics while outside the mainstream scientific establishment, working as a patent officer, though failed to achieve the Holy Grail, an overarching explanation to unite all the particles and forces of the cosmos.

Now Lisi, currently in Nevada, has come up with a proposal to do this. Lee Smolin at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, describes Lisi's work as "fabulous". "It is one of the most compelling unification models I've seen in many, many years," he says.

"Although he cultivates a bit of a surfer-guy image its clear he has put enormous effort and time into working the complexities of this structure out over several years," Prof Smolin tells The Telegraph.

"Some incredibly beautiful stuff falls out of Lisi's theory," adds David Ritz Finkelstein at the Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta. "This must be more than coincidence and he really is touching on something profound."

The new theory reported today in New Scientist has been laid out in an online paper entitled "An Exceptionally Simple Theory of Everything" by Lisi, who completed his doctorate in theoretical physics in 1999 at the University of California, San Diego.

He has high hopes that his new theory could provide what he says is a "radical new explanation" for the three decade old Standard Model, which weaves together three of the four fundamental forces of nature: the electromagnetic force; the strong force, which binds quarks together in atomic nuclei; and the weak force, which controls radioactive decay.

The reason for the excitement is that Lisi's model also takes account of gravity, a force that has only successfully been included by a rival and highly fashionable idea called string theory, one that proposes particles are made up of minute strings, which is highly complex and elegant but has lacked predictions by which to do experiments to see if it works.

But some are taking a cooler view. Prof Marcus du Sautoy told the Telegraph: "The proposal in this paper looks a long shot and there seem to be a lot things still to fill in."

And a colleague Eric Weinstein in America added: "Lisi seems like a hell of a guy. I'd love to meet him. But my friend Lee Smolin is betting on a very very long shot."

Lisi's inspiration lies in the most elegant and intricate shape known to mathematics, called E8 - a complex, eight-dimensional mathematical pattern with 248 points first found in 1887, but only fully understood by mathematicians this year after workings, that, if written out in tiny print, would cover an area the size of Manhattan.

E8 encapsulates the symmetries of a geometric object that is 57-dimensional and is itself is 248-dimensional. Lisi says "I think our universe is this beautiful shape."

What makes E8 so exciting is that Nature also seems to have embedded it at the heart of many bits of physics. One interpretation of why we have such a quirky list of fundamental particles is because they all result from different facets of the strange symmetries of E8.

Lisi's breakthrough came when he noticed that some of the equations describing E8's structure matched his own. "My brain exploded with the implications and the beauty of the thing," he tells New Scientist. "I thought: 'Holy crap, that's it!'"

What Lisi had realised was that he could find a way to place the various elementary particles and forces on E8's 248 points. What remained was 20 gaps which he filled with notional particles, for example those that some physicists predict to be associated with gravity.

Physicists have long puzzled over why elementary particles appear to belong to families, but this arises naturally from the geometry of E8, he says. So far, all the interactions predicted by the complex geometrical relationships inside E8 match with observations in the real world. "How cool is that?" he says.

The crucial test of Lisi's work will come only when he has made testable predictions. Lisi is now calculating the masses that the 20 new particles should have, in the hope that they may be spotted when the Large Hadron Collider starts up.

"The theory is very young, and still in development," he told the Telegraph. "Right now, I'd assign a low (but not tiny) likelyhood to this prediction.

"For comparison, I think the chances are higher that LHC will see some of these particles than it is that the LHC will see superparticles, extra dimensions, or micro black holes as predicted by string theory. I hope to get more (and different) predictions, with more confidence, out of this E8 Theory over the next year, before the LHC comes online."

http://tinyurl.com/2pepnx

More on E8 here:
http://tinyurl.com/3a9qre
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ideasman1Offline
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PostPosted: 15-11-2007 18:32    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow - this one resulted in an extended lunchbreak... Shocked

I downloaded the prepub and gave it a go. I'm a humble geneticist but even I could see he is using some relatively (by the standards if the area) straightforward mathematics to describe the fundamental particles and the 4 forces.

Definitely one to watch. I guess my only instinctive reservation in things like this is in what he says in his introduction. He states, "The mathematics of the universe should be beautiful. A succesful description of nature should be a concise, elegant, unified mathematical structure consistent with experience."

Well certainly it should be consistent with experience (i.e. empirical), but does it necessarily have to be concise and elegant. It could actually be messy and we try to impose order on it to make sense of it. I always feel this is like the weak theism of Einstein - "Raffiniert ist der Herrgott..." etc. It's a philosophical point.

Still, it will be interesting to see what the LHC has to say about the predictions. If they are borne out, look for posters of the E8 root system on pages 17 and 19 and popular science books with titles like 'The Snowflake Universe'...

Nice find!
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rynner
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PostPosted: 15-11-2007 19:43    Post subject: Reply with quote

ideasman1 wrote:
...look for posters of the E8 root system on pages 17 and 19 and popular science books with titles like 'The Snowflake Universe'...

And a packet of virtual ginger biscuits to the first person to derive E8 from the Kabbalah,
or vice-versa! Wink
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rynner
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PostPosted: 15-11-2007 20:33    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another aspect of E8:
Quote:
"What's attractive about studying E8 is that it's as complicated as symmetry can get", observed David Vogan from the Massachussetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the US.

"Mathematics can almost always offer another example that's harder than the one you're looking at now, but for Lie groups, E8 is the hardest one."

Professor Vogan is presenting the results at MIT in a lecture entitled The Character Table for E8, or How We Wrote Down a 453,060 x 453,060 Matrix and Found Happiness.
Very Happy
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/6466129.stm

No wonder E8 seems to have the God-like property of including everything...
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Pietro_Mercurios
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PostPosted: 15-11-2007 20:43    Post subject: Re: Theories of Everything Reply with quote

Mathematics are definitely not my strong point and maybe I'm a bit thick, but first of all the article says:
Quote:
...

Despite this unusual career path, his proposal is remarkable because, by the arcane standards of particle physics, it does not require highly complex mathematics.

Even better, it does not require more than one dimension of time and three of space, when some rival theories need ten or even more spatial dimensions and other bizarre concepts....

Then it says:
Quote:
...

Lisi's inspiration lies in the most elegant and intricate shape known to mathematics, called E8 - a complex, eight-dimensional mathematical pattern with 248 points first found in 1887, but only fully understood by mathematicians this year after workings, that, if written out in tiny print, would cover an area the size of Manhattan.

E8 encapsulates the symmetries of a geometric object that is 57-dimensional and is itself is 248-dimensional. Lisi says "I think our universe is this beautiful shape."

...

Am I missing something here? confused
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rynner
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PostPosted: 15-11-2007 21:34    Post subject: Re: Theories of Everything Reply with quote

Pietro_Mercurios wrote:
Am I missing something here? confused

Well, yes, but I agree it is confusing to the non-mathematician.

(TBH, it's confusing to me, but I'm nowhere near as good a mathematician as I'd like to be! Embarassed )

As I understand it, the physical world can still be described by the 3 spatial dimensions (up-down, left-right, near-far) and the dimension of time.

But all the objects and interactions we observe in the universe are very complex, and need much more information to describe them fully.

So you can describe a room by its length, width and height. But a fuller description would include its temperature, and temperature is another dimension (mathematically speaking). And the temperature might be different in different parts of the room, so we have to use an even more complex description which includes the temperature at each point of the room.

Then there is the air in the room, and its composition. How humid is it (another dimension), how much CO2 and other gases does it contain, how much radioactivity, etc.

Then there are the walls. What colour are they? Are they patterned, and if so, how?

All these questions can have numerical answers, which must lie somewhere along a 'dimension' (from 'least possible' to 'most possible').

And so it goes on. (Let's not think about the carpet!) In other words, to fully describe a room, you need to specify the values for many, many features, and all these features lie along a mathematical dimension.

So (as I understand it) E8, the most complex representation of symmetry possible in maths, encapsulates the symmetries of a geometric object that is 57-dimensional and is itself is 248-dimensional. E8 therefore includes not only the 4 dimensions of space-time, but all the possible ways in which all the things in our universe can interact. So it encapsulates electromagnetic fields, gravity, and all the weird phenomena of quantum mechanics, as well as relatively simple things like the size and age of your patio extension!

I hope this helps
(and that I am not speaking out of my nether regions) Shocked
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ideasman1Offline
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PostPosted: 16-11-2007 17:52    Post subject: Reply with quote

Laughing I hadn't thought of the Kabalah similarity...so if the scientific mainstream won't use the LHC to examine this, then maybe a few well endowed celebs with a mystical bent could fund it?? I can see the tabloid headlines now - 'Neighbours in uproar as Material Girl builds super accelerator in English Countryside'


Also, I guess if you take the 'universe is a computer simulation' route then E8 has something to do with the data structure in the code. If every possible instance of space time is described by an E8 array then obviously the creator had access to offshore software development resources that would be the envy of the sub-continent.

One thing is for sure, if there seems to be any substance in this it will run and run...
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PostPosted: 20-11-2007 19:09    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are the colours representative of anything in particular? Or just there for clarification to make the diagram easier to understand? It reminds me of a cross between a mandala, a rose window in a cathedral and God's spirograph.
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rynner
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PostPosted: 20-11-2007 19:29    Post subject: Reply with quote

jefflovestone wrote:
Are the colours representative of anything in particular? Or just there for clarification to make the diagram easier to understand? It reminds me of a cross between a mandala, a rose window in a cathedral and God's spirograph.

Well, the 'mandala' is just a two-dimensional representation of a set of relationships that exist in 57 dimensions, so presumably the different colours indicate which points are linked by relationships in dimensions 1, 2, 3,.... 57 respectively.

(This may be 'simple' to some physicists, but it may not be so to the man on the Clapham omnibus! Wink )
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rynner
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PostPosted: 24-11-2007 09:07    Post subject: Reply with quote

Surfer Dude's Theory of Everything - The Movie
By Roger Highfield, Science Editor
Last Updated: 6:01pm GMT 21/11/2007

Hollywood is now chasing the "surfer dude," who last week electrified the scientific community with his theory of everything, so that his extraordinary story can be told in a movie.

Such a theory aims to unite Einstein's General Relativity, which explains how the universe works on very large scales, with that of quantum mechanics, which describes the world of tiny elementary particles.

Now, after a decade of effort, a candidate idea for such a theory has been set out by Garrett Lisi, 39, who has a doctorate but no university affiliation and spends most of the year surfing in Hawaii. In winter, he heads to the mountains near Lake Tahoe, Nevada, where he snowboards.

"Since I'm not in academia, I only publish papers when I think I've found something cool," he says. But the response to his ideas has been anything but. Yesterday, he said that the feedback triggered by an article on www.telegraph.co.uk, has been "phenomenal."

"I have also received many emails of encouragement from the general public, which have been wonderful and completely overwhelming."

Meanwhile, a representative of a Hollywood film production company has been in touch with the Telegraph saying that "I loved the article and think it has great potential for a feature film."

And at least one major agent is scrambling to sell publishers a book that will tell the story of Garrett Lisi and his struggles to comprehend the cosmos.

The reason Lisi has captured the imagination is that he does not work in the scientific establishment. Backed by a little money from a privately funded research institute called FQXi, he has introduced his new theory of everything, based on E8, the most elegant and intricate structure known to mathematics - a complex pattern in eight dimensions with 248 points that was first found in 1887.

What Lisi realised was that he could link the various elementary particles and forces on E8's 248 points. What remained was 20 gaps which he filled with new particles, some of which might be detected at the Large Hadron Collider, the new atom smasher that will go into action next year in Geneva.

Physicists have long puzzled over why elementary particles appear to belong to families, but this arises naturally from the geometry of E8, he says.

So far, the interactions predicted by the complex geometrical relationships inside E8 match with observations in the real world. And it could be possible to test predictions. "How cool is that?" he says.

"It is futile to argue with nature, if she says your theory is wrong. This E8 Theory is mathematically and aesthetically beautiful, and so far it seems to agree with the physics we know. But it is a new theory, and not completely understood yet, and, of course, it may turn out to be wrong."

Ever since an article on his work appeared last week online on telegraph.co.uk he has become something of a celebrity and he admitted yesterday that he was finding the attention overwhelming - indeed he has refused to appear on television.

"I'm currently spending the bulk of my time corresponding with physicists, which I consider to be of prime importance. "

Although he spends most of his time working on wave theory, the video of him snowboarding was shot in Colorado by videographer Lowell Hart. Lisi says he will split his time this coming season between working on E8 Theory and snowboarding at Mt. Rose in Tahoe. Cool Cool indeed!

http://tinyurl.com/2vtogv
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rynner
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PostPosted: 22-01-2008 06:10    Post subject: Reply with quote

As you were....

Garrett Lisi: This surfer is no Einstein...

Last Updated: 12:01am GMT 22/01/2008
No Einstein...but behind Garrett Lisi's 'theory of everything' lies an amazing idea,
says Marcus du Sautoy

Two months ago, the physics world was buzzing with the news of a new Einstein. Garrett Lisi, an unemployed physicist with no university affiliation who spent his time surfing in Hawaii, had come up with the Holy Grail of science: a theory unifying quantum physics and Einstein's theory of relativity.

However, in the last few weeks several physics blogs have uncovered a problem with Lisi's idea: it doesn't work. Sad

But to understand why, it is necessary to explore the fascinating concept the 39-year-old based his theory on - symmetry.

Lisi was attempting to bridge quantum physics - which works for very small things, like electrons and protons - and relativity - which works for very large things, like galaxies and stars.

At the moment, we can't fit the two into one coherent model that accurately describes the world we see.

Yet the idea of symmetry is vital to both. Quantum physicists can explain the menagerie of fundamental particles we observe - quarks, gluons, fermions, bosons and more - as different facets of a symmetrical object.

Relativity, too, works so beautifully because of the symmetries that exist between space and time: Einstein's famous equation E=mc2 is essentially expressing a symmetry between mass and energy.

Symmetry is part of the language of nature: many animals and plants exploit symmetrical shapes as a way of standing out against the chaos of the landscape. Symmetry also underlies the molecular world.

Diamond gets its strength from its crystal structure, which binds the carbon atoms together. Viruses such as polio and HIV exploit the symmetry of the icosahedron, a 20-sided dice made up of triangular faces. Because of the simplicity of this shape, viruses find it easier to replicate.

It is also important in the arts. From the Moorish painters in the Alhambra, to Bach's work, symmetry is a crucial ingredient. Although we have been playing with symmetrical objects since the first dice were thrown, it is only in the last two centuries that a true understanding has evolved - thanks to French mathematician Evariste Galois.

Before his death in a duel in 1832, Galois created a language called group theory that shifted attention from the symmetries of objects to the ways they interact.

If I place a 50p piece on the table, I can count the number of symmetries by seeing how many times I can twist or flip it to end up with the same outline.

Just as the number seven is not a concrete thing, but a concept that can be applied to seven cats or seven cups, so Galois realised that the symmetries that describe the coin could describe those of another object.

This language, of talking about "groups" of symmetries, lets us prove that the vast number of designs on the walls in the Alhambra are examples of only 17 patterns.

One of Galois's most stunning breakthroughs was the realisation that there are fundamental symmetrical objects which act as building blocks for all others.

The first on his list were the rotations of coins with a prime number of sides - like the 50p piece (those with six, or eight, or nine sides were not "indivisible" - for example, the rotations of a 15-sided figure can be built out of the rotations of a triangle and a pentagon).

But there were others - the rotations of a football, for example, with its patchwork of hexagons and pentagons, are one of the atoms of symmetry.

The greatest achievement of 20th-century mathematics has been to complete Galois's project. We now have a list of all the building blocks of symmetry - but although they were christened "simple groups", they are far from it.

In particular, there are some very strange designs that don't seem to fit in, known as "sporadic" or "exceptional". The title of Lisi's paper - An Exceptionally Simple Theory of Everything - does not describe how easy his theory is, but refers to his use of one of these groups, called E8, as the key to his idea to unify quantum physics and relativity into a theory.

E8 can be thought of as the symmetries of a huge snowflake living in 248-dimensional space. Lisi believed that inside this he could bind the symmetries of the quantum world and relativity.

Unfortunately, the consensus, after investigation, is that it is impossible to use E8 in the way Lisi was hoping and produce a consistent model that reflects reality. Lisi has been riding a wave - but it is time to knock him off his board and recognise that we are still waiting for the next Einstein to span the gap between the symmetries of the very small and the very big.

Marcus du Sautoy is a Professor of Mathematics at Wadham College, Oxford.

http://tinyurl.com/2sjyxy

I guess that scuppers the film project, then...

Although, with a good script-writer, the rise from obscurity to fame and the fall back to obscurity could still make a good story...
(Are the script-writers still on strike?)
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rynner
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PostPosted: 14-08-2008 17:40    Post subject: Reply with quote

Surfer physicist gets grant to study theory of everything

Last week, the Foundational Questions Institute (FQXi) announced it has awarded $2.7 million in grants to 33 researchers to study basic questions in physics and cosmology.

Among the grant winners was surfer/theoretical physicist A. Garrett Lisi (pictured), who made the news last year with an unpublished paper entitled 'An Exceptionally Simple Theory of Everything.' Lisi will get $77,222 to work on his theory, which involves using a recently mapped 248-dimension mathematical structure called E8 to unify all the fundamental particles and forces, including gravity. In the last round of awards in 2006, FQXi gave Lisi $77,280 over two years.

A number of grants went out to theorists studying multiverse theories and quantum gravity. But two of the three biggest awards actually went to experimentalists. One recipient will look for changes in the universe's fine structure constant using the rare element dysprosium. Another laboratory test will aim to answer why we don't see quantum mechanical effects on large objects.

This second round of grants clears out the rest of the major money FQXi had to dispense in its first four years (it awarded $2.2 million at 2006).

At the moment, FQXi is financed by the Templeton Foundation. But as Columbia University mathematician Peter Woit notes, the foundation's future physics funding may be uncertain, as the organisation is under new management following the recent death of its founder, Sir John Templeton.

"We're actively looking for more funding," says FQXi scientific director Max Tegmark. This might include money from other sources, possibly with matching grants from Templeton.


....

http://www.newscientist.com/blog/space/2008/08/surfer-physicist-gets-grant-to-study.html?DCMP=NLC-nletter&nsref=blogspacephys
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PostPosted: 14-08-2008 19:48    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lisi doesn't look like a surfer dude - he doesn't have long tousled blonde hair...
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PostPosted: 08-02-2009 09:31    Post subject: Reply with quote

Professor Stephen Hawking: Einstein had futile quest
Stephen Hawking, the British physicist and best-selling author

Jonathan Leake
PROFESSOR Stephen Hawking is to publish a controversial new book suggesting Albert Einstein’s lifelong search for a “theory of everything” was probably a mistake.

Einstein is famed for his theories of relativity, published in his twenties, which described the relationship between time and space.

However, he spent much of the rest of his career in a failed attempt to reconcile such ideas with the behaviour of matter and energy at the sub-atomic level, now known as quantum theory. The same hunt preoccupies many physicists today.

In his new book The Grand Design, Hawking will suggest that the search for this “unified theory” is probably futile – a notion that will prove controversial with many colleagues.

One of his previous books, A Brief History of Time, became an international best-seller, and the new one is also expected to sell well.

Hawking said in a recent lecture, published on his website, www.hawking.org. uk: “Some people will be very disappointed if there is not an ultimate theory. I used to belong to that camp, but I have changed my mind. I’m now glad that our search for understanding will never come to an end.”

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/science/article5683551.ece
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PostPosted: 10-11-2009 09:42    Post subject: Reply with quote

Surfer dude's theory of everything: the magic of Garrett Lisi
The Big Idea: Roger Highfield explains why Garrett Lisi, the surfer who drew up a 'theory of everything' to explain the universe, is a great role model for science.
By Roger Highfield
Published: 7:00AM GMT 10 Nov 2009

[ video - vey pretty! ]

Of all the stories I've written in recent years, the most popular by far bore the intriguing headline: "Surfer dude stuns physicists with theory of everything." It described how an American, Garrett Lisi, had unveiled a new way to unite the laws and particles of the universe, in a paper entitled An Exceptionally Simple Theory of Everything.

I first picked up on the waves this unlikely figure was making in the scientific community when I read an article in New Scientist by Zeeya Merali. My take on the story broke in The Daily Telegraph in November 2007, and has since been viewed more than a million times on telegraph.co.uk. Only a few weeks ago, it was back at the top of the website's chart.

Hollywood wants to make 'Surfer Dude - the Movie' So why all the interest? Partly, because Lisi claimed to have found the answer to probably the most important question in science: how to find a coherent model of the universe that works on scales both very large (addressed by Einstein's theory of general relativity) and the very small (dealt with by quantum physics).

His take on it rested on an extraordinary mathematical object called E8, a complex shape described by a pattern of 248 points in eight dimensions, with a structure that, if written out as an equation in tiny print, would cover an area the size of Manhattan. It filled 20 gaps in the conventional theories with new particles, which seemed to arise naturally from the geometry of E8. As soon as he spotted this, he declared: "Holy crap, that's it!"

The ideas were described as "fabulous" by Lee Smolin, of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Ontario, Canada. David Ritz Finkelstein, of the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, added that "some incredibly beautiful stuff falls out of Lisi's theory".

Much of the excitement was because Lisi's theory seemed to challenge string theory – the dominant contender for a "theory of everything", over which there has been a bitter intellectual war. Its proponents (mostly superstar theorists) argue that the theory, which relies on tiny, subatomic "strings" vibrating across multiple dimensions, is too beautiful to be ignored. But there are detractors, from Smolin, who launched a scathing attack in a book called The Trouble with Physics, to doubters, such as Steven Weinberg, a Nobel prizewinner.

However, the dude had his critics, too. Prof Marcus du Sautoy, of Oxford University, said it was time to knock Lisi off his board, pointing out the ways physics blogs dissected his work. He, and many others, remain unconvinced.

Yet even if Lisi is wrong – as is usually the case with attempts to erect such all-encompassing theories – the world needs more surfer dudes. Lisi's effort captured the public imagination because, though the then 39-year-old had a doctorate, he did not work in the establishment, but was backed by a little money from a privately funded research institute called FQXi. We need more independent spirits like him, and others outside the mainstream, such as James Lovelock, the maverick environmentalist.

Lisi is also a great role model for science, in that he shatters the stereotype of a nerd. While he worked on his theory, he spent most of the year surfing in Hawaii, where he lived in a yurt. In winter, he headed to the mountains near Lake Tahoe, Nevada, where he would snowboard. He was so attractive a figure that TV companies lined up to film him and literary agents scrambled to sell the story of his struggle to comprehend the cosmos. A Hollywood executive said there was "great potential for a feature film".

No wonder that today, Lisi says things are going "more or less fantastically well". He is now trying to use axions (theoretical particles proposed by the Nobel laureate Frank Wilczek) to describe how particles get their masses. And he is organising an E8 Theory conference with the backing of the American Institute of Mathematics. He feels like he, and others, are on "the right track", and hopes that some of the particles he predicts might be detected by the Large Hadron Collider, the vast atom-smasher that is about to go into action in Geneva.

And, as well as pursuing his theory, Lisi is working on a film about young scientists who combine cutting-edge research with adventure sports. He maintains his appetite for both physical and intellectual adrenalin, and tells me: "I've been spending every other day surfing or kitesurfing here in Maui." No wonder his peers are jealous.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/6532614/Surfer-dudes-theory-of-everything-the-magic-of-Garrett-Lisi.html
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