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Cable Sabotage?
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TheCavynautOffline
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PostPosted: 11-01-2009 21:22    Post subject: Reply with quote

Probably nothing in it, but it's an interesting coincidence that this break happened just before the Israeli assault on the Gaza Strip.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 11-01-2009 21:58    Post subject: Reply with quote

TheCavynaut wrote:
Probably nothing in it, but it's an interesting coincidence that this break happened just before the Israeli assault on the Gaza Strip.

Don't Mention The War!!!

(But I have a horrible feeling you may be on to something.... Sad )
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 05-07-2009 08:58    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very long article here on undersea fibre-optic cables (internet, for the use of):
Web in trouble? The hidden cables under a Cornish beach feeding the world's internet
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/moslive/article-1196775/Web-trouble-The-hidden-cables-Cornish-beach-feeding-worlds-internet.html

But it's rather over-hyped:
Quote:
Most people think the internet is beamed around the planet by satellites. In fact, 90 per cent of global internet traffic is carried by a vast cable network, thousands of miles of which snake under the oceans.

The two busiest internet hubs are New York and London, and nine cables link them. But the one pictured above is the Atlantic's newest and most advanced submarine cable system. It is so powerful that it could carry the entire internet content in both directions even if the other eight lines failed simultaneously.

It travels 3,800 miles along the seabed from New York and reaches land at this north Cornish beach, making this remote footnote on Britain's coastline one of the most important and powerful telecommunications hubs in the world.

The precise location is secret for fear of terrorist sabotage, hence the grainy nature of our pictures - they were snapped by one of the cabling team and have never been published before. Live was given this one only when all interested parties agreed the beach is unidentifiable; we know where it is, but we're not telling, for obvious reasons.

This cable may be the best so far, but there are dozens of undersea cables that come ashore in Cornwall, on many beaches in the west of the county. (And we have Goonhilly to cover the satellite stuff too.)

Anyway, for the benefit of any terrorists reading this, here's how to find these cables: go to your local chandlers and buy nautical charts of the coast - all undersea cables are clearly marked! Twisted Evil (This is so that ships can avoid them when anchoring...)

No doubt within five minutes of my posting this top secret information, MI5 will break down my door and carry me off to the Tower of London... Shocked
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Black River FallsOffline
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PostPosted: 30-07-2009 14:14    Post subject: Reply with quote

The NWO has finally figured out how to deal with internet 419 scammers? Accident? Natural ocurrence? Who knows?

Quote:

Cable fault cuts off West Africa

It is not clear what has caused the new disruption.

Large parts of West Africa are struggling to get back online following damage to an undersea cable.

The fault has caused severe problems in Benin, Togo, Niger and Nigeria.

The blackout is thought to have been caused by damage to the SAT-3 cable which runs from Portugal and Spain to South Africa, via West Africa.

Around 70% of Nigeria's bandwidth was cut, causing severe problems for its banking sector, government and mobile phone networks.

"SAT-3 is currently the only fibre optic cable serving West Africa," explained Ladi Okuneye, chief marketing officer of Suburban Telecoms, which provides the majority of Nigeria's bandwidth.

"So all West African countries have to use it."

Companies were being forced to use alternatives - such as using satellite links - to maintain connections to the rest of the world, he said.

Telkom South Africa, one of the shareholders of SAT-3, has not said what caused the problems but said it was aware of "a cable fault on the Benin branch that is being investigated".

The 15,000km (9,300mile) SAT-3 cable lands in eight West African countries as it winds its way between Europe and South Africa.

"The rest of the system is unaffected by this fault," a Telkom South Africa representative said.

Nigeria has been badly hit because around 70% of its bandwidth is routed through neighbouring Benin.

The network, run by Suburban Telecom, was set up to bypass Nigeria's principal telecoms operator Nitel which runs the SAT-3 branch cable which lands in Nigeria.

The SAT-3 consortium is in the process of sending a ship from Cape Town in South Africa to the area to investigate the fault.

Mr Okuneye said that by the time the relevant paperwork was done, it was likely to be "two weeks" before the ship arrived off the coast.

Meanwhile, Benin has been able to reroute its net traffic through neighbouring countries to get back online.

Mr Okuneye said his company was hoping to do the same but said the process would be slower because its bandwidth requirements were so much larger than those of the small republic.

Togo and Niger, which are not part of the SAT-3 consortium, remain offline.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/8176014.stm
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 27-02-2012 21:29    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ship's anchor slows down East African web connection

East Africa's high-speed internet access has been severely disrupted after a ship dropped its anchor onto fibre-optic cables off Kenya's coast.
The ship was waiting to enter Mombasa - one of Africa's busiest ports - when it anchored in a restricted area.
It could take up to 14 days to repair, cable owners The East African Marine Systems (Teams) told the BBC.
This is one of three undersea cables to have arrived in the region since 2009, delivering faster internet access.

Cables run by Teams, which is partly owned by the Kenyan government, and Eassy - a consortium of telecoms companies - were damaged at the weekend.
Internet service providers and mobile phone operators have re-routed to the Seacom link - which was not damaged by the dropped anchor.
But the companies have only bought a small amount of bandwidth because of cost.

The BBC's Noel Mwakugu in Nairobi says as a result internet connections are expected to slow down by 20% in Kenya, Rwanda, Burundi, Tanzania, Ethiopia and South Sudan's capital, Juba.

Seacom - the first to be up and running - links East Africa to Europe, India and South Africa.
Teams links the region to the United Arab Emirates - and Eassy, which went live in July 2010, links countries along the East African coast.

Correspondents say that since then, the increased bandwidth has given a boost to mobile services and the burgeoning tech scene of home-grown developers, programmers and designers in Kenya.
In the first 12 months after the cables arrived, the number of internet subscriptions in the country jumped from 1.8m to 3.1m.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-17179544
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 30-03-2013 10:34    Post subject: Reply with quote

Undersea internet cables off Egypt disrupted as navy arrests three
Coastguard arrests three men off Alexandria, claiming they were cutting cable known as SE-WE-ME-4, amid disruptions to internet connectivity in Egypt and beyond
Charles Arthur, guardian.co.uk, Thursday 28 March 2013 22.00 GMT

Egyptian naval forces have arrested three scuba divers who they say were trying to cut an undersea cable off the port of Alexandria that provides one-third of all internet capacity between Europe and Egypt.

However the navy who captured the men had no explanation of who they were working for, where they came from or why they would want to disrupt Egypt's internet communications.

Pictures on the Egyptian coastguard's Facebook page showed the three men tied up on board a boat, and alleged they were cutting an undersea cable partly owned by Telecom Egypt, the country's main communications organisation. The men had been on a fishing boat, said a statement by Colonel Ahmed Mohammed Ali, but offered no other details.

The world internet submarine cable map by the telecoms analysis company Telegeography shows that six cables come aground at Alexandria. The men were allegedly trying to cut the SeaWeMe-4 (South-east Asia-Middle East-Western Europe-4) cable, able to carry a third of the traffic between Europe and Egypt. Covering a distance of 20,000km, it enters the sea at Marseilles and makes landfall in Annaba in 15 other countries including Sri Lanka, Thailand and India.

[Map showing the location of Sea-We-Me-4 cable. Source: Telegeography]

It is one of eight undersea cables between Europe and Egypt - so cutting one would not immediately destroy connectivity, but would lead to congestion and slowdowns.

However reports earlier this week suggested cable breaks on four cables around Egypt - IMEWE (linking France to India via Alexandria and Suez), TE-North (owned by Telecom Egypt), EIG (Europe India Gateway), and SEA-ME-WE-3, a partner to the cable that was allegedly attacked. That would cause significant [?!]

Internet services in Egypt have been suffering disruption since 22 March, apparently after a ship's anchor cut through another cable.

Worldwide, undersea cables carry 99% of intercontinental internet traffic, and form complex networks across the world. Jim Cowie, co-founder and chief technology officer at the network security company Renesys, said that internet connections had been slowed down as far away as Pakistan and India.

Internet connectivity in the Middle East was seriously affected in 2008 when ships' anchors cut through cables, which cut capacity between Europe and Africa by up to 70%.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2013/mar/28/egypt-undersea-cable-arrests
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