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krakentenOffline
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PostPosted: 28-01-2014 18:45    Post subject: Reply with quote

And do remember the Glomar Explorer, an elaborate secret project to raise a Soviet submarine.

The project was not fully successful, and the deception expended on the citizens of the United States is a stink in the nostrils of God.

About the only good thing to come of it was the novel, "The Jennifer Morgue", one of Charles Stross' wonderful meldings of espionage thrillers with the Cthulhu Mythos.

It's disturbing how well the two genres mix-William Gibson did a similar turn with his "Spook Country, without Cthulhu&Co. and a nasty little gem called "The Milkweed Trilogy" does much the same thing.

Eldrich, squamous and rugose, who can ask for more?
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PostPosted: 12-02-2014 15:28    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Jaywalking: How the car industry outlawed crossing the road
By Aidan Lewis
BBC News, Washington
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-26073797

The idea of being fined for crossing the road at the wrong place can bemuse foreign visitors to the US, where the origins of so-called jaywalking lie in a propaganda campaign by the motor industry in the 1920s.

The California Vehicle Code states: "No pedestrian shall start crossing in direction of a flashing or steady "DON'T WALK" or upraised hand symbol." It also forbids crossing between controlled intersections, or "jaywalking".

Late last year, police began a concerted effort to enforce the rules in central Los Angeles. Pedestrians had been "impeding traffic and causing too many accidents and deaths", one traffic police official said. Fines range from $190-$250 (£115-£152).

Then in New York officials responded to several pedestrian deaths last month by issuing a flurry of tickets for jaywalking. The campaign quickly ran into controversy when an 84-year-old Chinese immigrant who had been stopped for jaywalking suffered a gash to his head during an altercation with the police.

Enforcement of anti-jaywalking laws in the US is sporadic, often only triggered by repeated complaints from drivers about pedestrian behaviour in a particular place. But jaywalking remains illegal across the country, and has been for many decades.

The first known reference to it dates to December 1913, says Peter Norton, a history professor at the University of Virginia and author of Fighting Traffic - The Dawn of the Motor Age in the American City. That month a department store in Syracuse hired a Santa Claus who stood on the street with a megaphone, bellowing at people who didn't cross properly and calling them jaywalkers.

Continue reading the main story
Countries where jaywalkers are fined

US, Australia, Canada, China, Germany, Philippines, Singapore
"I don't know how this got to Syracuse, but in mid-western slang a jay was a person from the country who was an empty-headed chatterbox, like a bluejay," he says.

The word was first used to describe "someone from the countryside who goes to the city and is so dazzled by the lights and the show windows that they keep stopping and getting in the way of other pedestrians".

The use of jaywalking as a term of ridicule against pedestrians crossing roads took off in the 1920s.

A key moment, says Norton, was a petition signed by 42,000 people in Cincinnati in 1923 to limit the speed of cars mechanically to 25mph (40kph). Though the petition failed, an alarmed auto industry scrambled to shift the blame for pedestrian casualties from drivers to walkers.

Local car firms got boy scouts to hand out cards to pedestrians explaining jaywalking. "These kids would be posted on sidewalks and when they saw someone starting to jaywalk they'd hand them one of these cards," says Norton. "It would tell them that it was dangerous and old fashioned and that it's a new era and we can't cross streets that way."

Image of a card handed to pedestrians in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1921. Reproduced in Street Rivals: Jaywalking and the invention of the Motor Age by Peter Norton, Technology and Culture, Volume 48, Number 2, April 2007
A card handed to pedestrians in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1921
Clowns were commonly used in parades or pageants to portray jaywalkers as a throwback to rural, ignorant, pre-motor age ways.

Another ruse was to provide local newspapers with a free service. Reporters would submit a few facts about local traffic accidents to Detroit, and the auto industry's safety committee would send back a full report on the situation in their city.

"The newspaper coverage quite suddenly changes, so that in 1923 they're all blaming the drivers, and by late 1924 they're all blaming jaywalking," Norton says.

Soon, he adds, car lobby groups also started taking over school safety education, stressing that "streets are for cars and children need to stay out of them". Anti-jaywalking laws were adopted in many cities in the late 1920s, and became the norm by the 1930s.

Continue reading the main story
Breakdown of all trips made in the US

Driving: 83%
Walking: 10.4%
Other (includes cycling): 4.2%
Public transport: 1.9%
Source: National Household Travel Survey, 2009

In the decades that followed, the cultural ascendancy of the car was secured as the auto industry promoted "America's love affair with the automobile". Car makers portrayed them as the ultimate expression of personal freedom, an essential element of the "American dream".

Meanwhile, an overriding goal of city planners and engineers became allowing traffic to circulate unhindered.

"For years, pedestrians were essentially written out of the equation when it came to designing streets," says Tom Vanderbilt, author of Traffic - Why We Drive the Way We Do.

"They didn't even appear in early computer models, and when they did, it was largely for their role as 'impedance' - blocking vehicle traffic."

This made US cities unusually hostile to walkers, says Vanderbilt. Jaywalking became an "often misunderstood umbrella term", covering many situations in which the pedestrian should in fact have the right of way.

Some countries have followed the lead of the US and imposed anti-jaywalking measures. Police in China began a fresh push to stop jaywalking last year, fining offenders and in Shanghai, making them read out traffic regulations aloud.

People cross the road in Beijing, May 2013
Beijing was one Chinese city where police began fining jaywalkers last year
Elsewhere, in Cairo say, or Calcutta, a lack of rules, enforcement and pedestrian infrastructure mean that the only way to cross the road is often by launching oneself into the oncoming traffic.

The UK is among those countries where jaywalking is not an offence. But the rate of pedestrian deaths is half that of the US, at 0.736 per 100,000 inhabitants in 2011 compared to 1.422 per 100,000 in America.

Even in Singapore, where repeated jaywalking offences can lead to a $1,000 fine or a six month jail term, rules are routinely flouted.

There has been resistance in the US too. Newspaper reports from the 1920s show that many were irritated by the cards handed out by boy scouts, says Peter Norton.

In New York, an earlier effort to crack down on jaywalking under former mayor Rudy Giuliani met with opposition from police officers who said they had better things to do. And in Los Angeles, the setting for The Pedestrian, Ray Bradbury's dystopian science-fiction short story from 1951, walkers and cyclists have recently become more common downtown.

When the LAPD advertised the anti-jaywalking campaign on its Facebook page, responses accused the police of seeking an easy source of revenue by fining people with the means to pay, and of wasting their time.

Continue reading the main story
More from the Magazine

Green man in Germany
Does pressing the pedestrian crossing button make a difference?

Using snow to design safer streets

What Brits should know about jaywalking

"I love how I see people getting jaywalking tickets everyday at the corner of 5th and Broadway by our loft, and yet I can't walk to my car without getting offered… any variety of hardcore narcotics," wrote one woman in a message that ended "#priorities".

Advocates for walking say drivers are most often to blame for pedestrian deaths and injuries, and that there is no evidence to prove that anti-jaywalking campaigns are effective.

That rings true for John Moffat, a former commander of Seattle's traffic police.

Seattle was known for being especially strict on jaywalking, and Moffat calculated that some 500,000 tickets had been issued there between the 1930s and the 1980s. But he oversaw a change of policy in 1988 after a study in the city showed that the most vulnerable pedestrians were the elderly, children and drunks - not jaywalkers. "Are they the ones ending up in the morgue or in hospital?" he says. "The answer is no, and the reason is that most of them are pretty fleet of foot and agile."

Some think that the success of several projects to make US cities more walkable is a sign of hope for pedestrians.

But there is little experimentation with more radical projects such as shared space, which aims to reduce traffic speed by removing the distinction between streets and pavements. And fines for jaywalking look set to continue, says Ray Thomas, a lawyer in Portland, Oregon, who specialises in pedestrian and bicycle law.

"People in law-enforcement tend to identify with a motorist's perspective", he says. Wherever there's a push to protect the rights of pedestrians, officials feel they also need to enforce limits on them.

"It's their version of being fair," he says. "The difference is that no jaywalking pedestrian ever ran down and killed a driver, and by sheer survival strategy most pedestrians don't jaywalk in front of cars."

Follow @BBCNewsMagazine on Twitter and on Facebook
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KondoruOffline
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PostPosted: 13-02-2014 18:26    Post subject: Reply with quote

An entertaining article, but must the Beeb report on Things Yankee yet again?
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PostPosted: 15-02-2014 13:00    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Nazis 'researched use of mosquitoes for war' at Dachau
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-26193808

A mosquito is bloated with blood as it inserts its stinger into human flesh in this undated file photo obtained from the US Department of Agriculture

Malaria is transmitted via mosquitoes

German scientists at Dachau concentration camp researched the possible use of malaria-infected mosquitoes as weapons during World War Two, a researcher has claimed.

Dr Klaus Reinhardt of Tuebingen University examined the archives of the Entomological Institute at Dachau.

He found that biologists had looked at which mosquitoes might best be able to survive outside their natural habitat.

He speculates that such insects could have been dropped over enemy territory.

Continue reading the main story
Nazi experiments

According to medical historian Paul Weindling, almost 25,000 victims of Nazi scientific experiments have now been identified.
Dr Weindling says there were different "phases" to the Nazis' experiments. The first was linked to eugenics and forced sterilisation.
The second phase coincided with the start of the war. "Doctors began experimenting on patients in psychiatric hospitals," Prof Weindling writes. "Sporadic experiments were made in concentration camps like Sachsenhausen near Berlin, and anthropological observations at Dachau."
The third phase began in 1942, when the SS and German military took greater control of the experiments. There was a surge in the numbers of experiments, with lethal diseases including malaria and louse-borne typhus administered to thousands of victims.
During a fourth phase in 1944-45, explains Dr Weindling, "scientists knew the war was lost but they continued their experiments".
Read one researcher's account of uncovering the Nazis' lost victims
Heinrich Himmler, the leader of the SS, set up the institute at Dachau in 1942.

Disease
The organisation's work was believed to have focused on insect-borne diseases such as typhus, which afflicted the camp inmates.

Dr Reinhardt, writing in the journal Endeavour, has found evidence that the unit's researchers investigated a particular type of mosquito which could live without food and water for four days.

That means it could be infected with malaria and then dropped from the air - and survive long enough to infect large numbers of people, he says.

He speculates that the scientists were investigating the possible use of malaria - transmitted via mosquitoes - as a biological weapon.

It is not known whether there is a connection between the work of the Entomological Institute at Dachau and the experiments carried out by Dr Claus Schilling at the camp.

Schilling used prisoners as experimental subjects in his research on malaria - deliberately infecting them - and was sentenced to death by hanging at the Dachau trials held after the war.

Visitors walk past the main gate with the sign "Arbeit macht frei" (work sets you free) at the former concentration camp in Dachau near Munich January 25, 2014

Some prisoners at Dachau were victims of forced experimentation
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kamalktkOffline
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PostPosted: 21-02-2014 22:49    Post subject: Reply with quote

A jet train, it still holds the American record for fastest train. There are a number of pictures and a youtube video of it in motion.

http://gizmodo.com/my-grandad-was-vp-of-testing-and-materials-for-the-b-1527899498

In the mid-1960's, New York Central Railroad engineer Don Wetzel was exploring ways to make trains run safer, cheaper, but most importantly: faster. And, clearly, the most logical means of accomplishing all three of these objectives was to strap a pair of Air Force surplus jet engines to the roof of a prototype high-speed locomotive, creating the world's fastest self-propelled train. Wait, what?

Built in 1966 by the New York Central Railroad corporation, the M-497 Black Beetle experimental jet-powered locomotive was the first, but surprisingly not the last, of its kind. The Black Beetle utilized an existing Budd Rail Diesel Car (RDC-3) with an added, streamlined front cowling covering the RDC-3's conventionally blunted nose, and a pair of second-hand General Electric J47-19 jet engines, which had previously been employed as boosters for the Convair B-36 intercontinental bomber, that Wetzel had acquired from the USAF.

At $5,000 for the pair, "They were the cheapest 5,000 horsepower engines we could find, "Wetzel recently explained to GE Reports. "They were also the most reliable." What's more, Wetzel explained, "The engines could be easily adapted to burn diesel as opposed to jet fuel" making them ideal for use in both the Black Beetle and Wetzel's previously patented railroad snow blower (below).

This 1960s Jet Train Is Still America's Fastest Locomotive

As for the design of the RDC-3 itself, Wetzel told GE Reports:

My wife is a commercial artist and she did the streamlining design. The original design had the jet engines on the rear end of the car, but we changed it to the forward end. She said that the car looked a lot better with the engines on the front. There's an old pilot legend that if an airplane looks good, it usually flies good. We felt that if the jet train looked good, it would run good.

Boy, did it ever! The Black Beetle ran a series of time trials over existing tracks running between Butler, Indiana and Stryker, Ohio. This long, straight, and level stretch of railway provided an ideal testing area for the jet train. During its trial runs, the Black Beetle hit an astounding 183.681 mph, which still stands as the high speed record for self-propelled light rail in the United States.

In fact, the M-497 had a slightly higher top speed. Per Wetzel:

On my second run our speed reached 196 mph and we were decelerating when we went through the timing traps. They told me that they wanted the train to run through at 180 mph. Everybody thought that it was quite funny that we set a world record while decelerating. We were going 183.35 mph when got through the gate.

Despite the record setting run, the idea of a turbojet train never really took off. While the New York Central Railroad garnered a huge cache of technical data on high-speed rail travel and the resulting track wear and the Soviets quickly fielded their own version, at the time, the project was seen more as a publicity stunt rather than earnest research. Once the trial runs had been completed, the Black Beetle's jets were removed and the locomotive was returned to normal service.

The American jet train led to the Soviet's making their own version.
http://gizmodo.com/293010/the-soviet-union-vs-us-jet-train-race
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CochiseOffline
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PostPosted: 22-02-2014 08:19    Post subject: Reply with quote

Who were the Attecotti?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attacotti

They were apparently distinct from the Scots (who were actually Irish) but no-one really knows who they were or where they were from.
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rynner2Online
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PostPosted: 22-02-2014 09:39    Post subject: Reply with quote

kamalktk wrote:
A jet train, it still holds the American record for fastest train. There are a number of pictures and a youtube video of it in motion.

http://gizmodo.com/my-grandad-was-vp-of-testing-and-materials-for-the-b-1527899498

This would have been a good post for the March of Technology:
http://www.forteantimes.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=36425

When the march pauses for a few years, or decades, that particular aspect of technology is frequently forgotten by most people.
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PostPosted: 22-02-2014 10:36    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cochise wrote:
Who were the Attecotti?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attacotti

They were apparently distinct from the Scots (who were actually Irish) but no-one really knows who they were or where they were from.


Cannibals, definitely the real Scots.
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rynner2Online
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PostPosted: 22-02-2014 12:14    Post subject: Reply with quote

When you think of British Coal Mining, you think of Wales, Notts, and the NE, etc, so this piece came as a surprise to me, especially as the Somerset mines were still working into my lifetime.

The group gathers beside the skeleton of its industry.
By West Country Life | Posted: February 22, 2014

So familiar is this body of buildings in which they stand that the men could find their way around in the dark.
Ludlows Colliery in Radstock no longer surrenders the coal which warmed the heart of the nation and put food on the table of its labourers. They put their hearts into the North Somerset coalfields, and some of them stand before us.

Bryan Mann controls his frustration at his reliance on his supporting stick. The former roadman, aged 84, drove the tunnels, going in before the miners, finding coal, boring 56 holes seven feet long, blasting them, then sending out the rubbish.

David Wilcox, aged 79, a shaftsman, of sturdy frame, points out the architecture which remains.
Railway lines were where horses pulled coal wagons to the railway networks of the Great Western and the Somerset and Dorset. Later horses gave way to a tractor.

Francis Hillier, aged 84, a former wages clerk at Ludlows, and chairman of the Miners' Trust, offers a serious side to the banter in his ear, his sight set on the past. Peering into the boot of his car he reveals a "guss and crook", a rope and iron hook, a device which lacks subtlety and was unique to the Somerset coalfield.
It was worn by young boys to drag coal in a "putt": "It scarred youngsters for life, they cried for weeks on end. Their sores were treated with urine," he said.

"Mining was very cruel, deaths common-place," he says. "There were two jobs to go to as careers, either underground or farming. A lot of people who went underground were very well-read, but there were only these two choices in this part of the world."

Francis began his colliery life in 1943. Then there were 13 pits and more than 3,000 miners. In 1901 there had been 79 collieries producing 1,250,000 tonnes a year, but they gradually became more uneconomic and the last mine closed in 1973.

At Pensford colliery black is still the dominant colour. Then the heavy rain brings a ruddy orange into the spectrum. Rainwater runs down the bricks of the remaining generating house and winding house.

Bill Morris, along with brothers Robert and Ernie Bailey, have returned to their old place of work. The three live in Pensford and for a few years worked together. Bill also worked in Radstock. Ernie worked for Pensford and Bromley Collieries Ltd, the site of which he picks out with the precision of an eyewitness in the direction of the north west from where the storm clouds swept in with bitter ferocity.
"When the pit closed it broke up the village a bit," says Ernie an electrician who worked under ground.

Robert Bailey, a stint measurer stands rigid against the biting wind reflecting on the November of 1958 when the last shift departed and entered history.

Ken Payne, aged 79, is the only former miner still living in a miners cottage, built around 1834 at Whitelands in Radstock. He worked at four pits, starting at Old Mills at the age of 15. He was on the coalface at 17, and as he talks his hand reveals an old injury with the top half of a finger missing. He worked at Old Mills, New Rock, Kilmersdon and Writhlington.

Bryn Hawkins left school at the age of 14 and was annoyed that he could not go down the pit until 15 years of age. He lived at Camerton and trained at Old Mills mining training college. He worked as an engineer at Norton Hill, Writhlington and Old Mills.

Bryn nonchalantly delivers a parting statement: "If there is anything I can do for you…" Words delivered by a man who spent years aware that his own life and those of his mining colleagues were bound as one. Also revealing that he and his Miners Trust companions are still at work just… below the surface. Shocked

Read more: http://www.westerndailypress.co.uk/group-gathers-skeleton-industry/story-20682790-detail/story.html#ixzz2u3DWGUHo

With several photos.
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rynner2Online
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PostPosted: 05-03-2014 09:35    Post subject: Reply with quote

St Piran's Oratory emerges from the sands: PICTURES
8:54am Tuesday 4th March 2014
[Pictures with thanks to Myarch Brett]

Work is continuing on the excavation of St Piran's Oratory near Perranporth, with the top of the Oratory and the 1910 protective structure carefully uncovered by archaeologists.

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/11050778.Top_of_St_Piran_s_Oratory_emerges_from_the_sands__PICTURES/?ref=mr
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PostPosted: 16-03-2014 13:56    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Forgotten names added to South Yorkshire war memorial
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-south-yorkshire-26601510

The name of a navy airman who was executed by the Japanese in World War Two has been added to a Sheffield war memorial.

Ivor Barker was beheaded by two Japanese officers in a prison camp in Singapore two days after Japan had surrendered the territory in July 1945.

Mr Barker's niece, Sandra Smith, discovered that his name was not on the local war memorial.

After a campaign led by Ms Smith, Mr Barker's name has now been added.

A service of dedication has taken place at the site of the memorial at Christ Church, Hollinsend.

Mr Barker was captured after his plane was shot down during a raid on an oil field.

'Cruelly beheaded'
Ms Smith said that she only recently discovered the fate of her uncle, who was 21 when he was executed.

"His family were led to believe that his plane was shot down in the attack with no survivors," she said.

"However in 2008 as part of my family tree research I discovered that Ivor was one of the group known as The Palembang Nine, all of whom were cruelly beheaded by two Japanese officers, two days after the capitulation.

"This was a very sad discovery, my only consolation being that my grandparents and Ivor's seven siblings never knew the detail of his horrendous passing."

Members of Mr Barker's family were at the dedication service.

Two other local men who died in the conflict have also had their names added.

Thomas Croft, 29 and Stanley Davies, 24, were both killed during the invasion of Italy in 1944.
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PostPosted: 17-03-2014 06:01    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was walking out of an old building I used to live in a few years back and saw an old man looking up at it with a smile on his face. He introduced himself and said he'd lived in the building for a while with his regiment during World War 2.

He told me that there had been an American and English army base a couple of miles up the coastal road (in between Cromer and Sheringham). The Yanks had put up a sign next their official sign that boasted 'Second To None' ... apparently our lads saw this and responded by putting a second sign up by our official sign that read simply 'None' ... Laughing
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PostPosted: 17-03-2014 15:58    Post subject: Reply with quote

Teehee

Ive been busy the last few days, digging up some religious building in Cornwall...
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PostPosted: 18-03-2014 13:49    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Myanmar's Indian independence veterans demand recognition
By Swaminathan Natarajan
BBC Tamil, Myanmar
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-24851298

Statue of Subash Chandra Bose in Calcutta

INA leader Subash Chandra Bose is venerated by many in India

Veteran Indian soldiers in Myanmar who took up arms to fight against the British to secure Indian independence are demanding that they should qualify for a freedom fighter pension from the Indian government.

Thousands of Indian soldiers joined a militia formed by charismatic Bengali leader Subash Chandra Bose in the final years of the independence struggle.

With help from Hitler and imperial Japan he formed the Indian National Army (INA) to fight against British colonial rule. Bose even travelled to Berlin during the war to seek Hitler's help in providing arms and training.

Indian officers and soldiers of the British Indian Army - who were captured by the Japanese in the eastern front during the early years of World War Two - switched their loyalty to Bose and formed the core of the INA.

Cramped house
Indians from all walks of life, cutting across most religions, swelled the ranks. They included thousands of Tamils who lived in South-East Asia.

K Perumal (left) and SP Muthuvel
INA veterans K Perumal (left) and SP Muthuvel say India has a moral duty to provide them with a pension
At the beginning of the 19th Century thousands of Tamil's from south India went to what was then called Burma - now known as Myanmar - to work as farm labourers.

They were taken there by - or as members of - a wealthy trading caste group known as Chettiars. During WWII, the descendants of Chettiars were a community of thriving farmers and traders.

Lieutenant K Perumal lives with his large extended family in a wooden house in Yangon (formerly Rangoon). The youngest family member is barely a few months old.

In one corner of his cramped house, Mr Perumal, 88, keeps a steel box containing old press clippings and photos which take him back to WWII.

"I joined the INA in 1943. I was in the propaganda department. I along with others in my unit did door-to-door recruitment campaigns," he says.

Mr Perumal is a Tamil who was born in Burma. At the time of joining the INA he had not even seen India.

He vividly remembers places associated with Bose in Yangon and keeps in touch with other veterans like the 94-year-old SP Muthuvel, who was born in Puddukkottai in what is now in the Indian state of Tamil Nadu.

British 'discrimination'
"I came to Burma at the age of 15 to work as an accountant. I was deeply influenced by Bose and left my job to join the INA. I worked in the logistics department and sometimes as an air raid watcher," Mr Muthuvel said.

Boy dressed in uniform of Indian National Army
Although the Indian National Army was defeated, its contribution to the fight for freedom is recognised every year at Independence Day celebrations
After a brief stint with the INA, Mr Muthuvel went back to his previous existence and started working again as an accountant.

The decision by Tamils in Burma to sign up with Bose was in part motivated by what they considered to be Britain's discrimination against them.

Unlike Sikhs and Pathans, Tamils were not classified as martial races and therefore were not given preferential status by army recruiters.

"Bose did not believe in the [martial race] concept and was willing to take Tamils in large numbers," says Harvard university Professor Sugatha Bose, who is also an INA historian and Bose's grand-nephew.

"Burma was the springboard for the INA's military operations," he said.

"During the 1940s Tamils constituted the largest ethnic group among Indians who had settled in South-East Asia.

"Tamils from Burma, Singapore and Malaysia joined the INA in large numbers. Barring a few Bengalis, the women's battalion known as the Rani of Jhansi Regiment consisted entirely of Tamils."

Highly contested
The INA's advance towards north-eastern India alongside the Japanese army registered some initial gains, but was eventually held back by British counter-attacks.

Continue reading the main story

Start Quote

[The Indian government] should recognise the contribution of Indians living abroad and persons of Indian origin in the freedom struggle”

Dr Sugatha Bose
Harvard university professor and INA historian
Those who survived the war, like Mr Muthuvel, were mostly caught and imprisoned. But some, like Mr Perumal, escaped jail by keeping a low profile.

"My family members burnt my INA uniform and other official papers. Another family I know dumped all the items associated with the INA in a river," he recalls.

The overall effectiveness and the ultimate impact of Bose's armed campaign are highly contested. When and where he died is also in dispute. Yet what is not contested is the fact that he continues to remain a hugely inspirational figure for generations of Indians.

After India became independent in 1947 thousands of men like Mr Perumal and Mr Muthuvel decided to stay in Burma.

But they were not included when the government of India decided in 1970 to give pensions to INA war veterans of about $241 (£150) per month. It was decided that pensions should only be given to citizens of India - not to those who live outside the country.

Mr Perumal wrote to the prime minister's office several years ago demanding a review.

"The Indian government in turn asked me to come and settle in India," he said.

"But I have 17 children and grand-children here. I cannot leave everything and go to India.

"I am happy to be a citizen of Burma which has given me everything. The British government gives pensions to Gurkhas irrespective of where they live. The government of India should adopt a similar approach."

Tamil community hall in Rangoon
This community hall was used by Subash Chandra Bose to address Tamils in Rangoon during the war
Dr Sugatha Bose also feels the government should be as magnanimous as possible.

"They should recognise the contribution of Indians living abroad and persons of Indian origin in the freedom struggle," he said.

INA veterans point out that there are now only a few hundred of them left in Myanmar who will benefit from any change in pensions policy.

Most of them are close to 90 and have no income or assets - they are dependent on their children.

The Indian government has a moral duty to look after them, they say.
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PostPosted: 20-03-2014 14:52    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner2 wrote:
St Piran's Oratory emerges from the sands: PICTURES
8:54am Tuesday 4th March 2014
[Pictures with thanks to Myarch Brett]

Work is continuing on the excavation of St Piran's Oratory near Perranporth, with the top of the Oratory and the 1910 protective structure carefully uncovered by archaeologists.

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/11050778.Top_of_St_Piran_s_Oratory_emerges_from_the_sands__PICTURES/?ref=mr

100-year-old bottle of beer found at St Piran's church

A bottle of beer believed to be more than 100-years-old has been found at an ancient church in Cornwall.
The bottle, still containing some of the beer, was found at St Piran's Oratory, near Perranporth, which is believed to be among the oldest places of Christian worship in Britain.
St Piran is the patron saint of tin miners and the phrase 'drunk as a Perraner' also comes from the legend.
The beer will be analysed to see what brew was used.

A spokesman from St Austell Brewery said it was believed the bottle dated back to 1910 and was found in an "immaculate condition".
He added the bottle also had a swastika logo on the cap, a popular brewing symbol at the time.

Archaeologist James Gossip said the bottle was believed to have been left in the sand by a worker in 1910 when the oratory was encased in a concrete structure in an attempt to protect it from the encroaching sand and waves.

...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-26660405
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