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Albino Animals
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Anonymous
PostPosted: 28-05-2002 11:41    Post subject: White Elephants Reply with quote

[edit: I have now made this a general thread for tales of albino or white creatures.]

Breaking News on the home page has an article about a new White Elephant being found in Thailand. Never having even seen a picture of one I did a search and found this
http://www.mahidol.ac.th/Thailand/glance-thai/elephant.html, a page about Royal Thai elephants.
Must say it is disappointing - they are not white at all, just a lighter shade of grey. I don't really understand how this can be 'albino', compared to other albino creatures which tend to be pure white.
I was wondering if anyone on the board has seen a white elephant in real life?


Last edited by Guest on 28-05-2004 03:00; edited 1 time in total
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Anonymous
PostPosted: 28-05-2002 12:44    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, when PT Barnum sold off a white elephant that was actually pink, he defended himself with that caucasians are also called white.
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rynner
Location: Still above sea level
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PostPosted: 24-07-2002 20:09    Post subject: White Whale? Reply with quote

In early June, 1985, I was sailing south across the Bay of Biscay. I was alone on watch, my only crew was sleeping below. It was a fine clear day, and I saw a disturbance in the water perhaps 200m away. Then a small white whale jumped clear of the water!

In shape it resembled a porpoise, but it was clearly much larger. It jumped out of the water a few more times, and I called for my crew to come and see, but he only arrived in time to see the last splash settling, as the whale had now disappeared.

Later I looked up some books to see if I could identify it. It very closely resembled a Beluga - but there were 2 problems with this. It seems that beluga are an arctic species, never seen so far south, and they do not jump out of the water.

So did I see an out-of-place, extra-athletic beluga, or a king-size albino dolphin - or what?

Any ideas?
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naitakaOffline
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PostPosted: 24-07-2002 21:42    Post subject: Reply with quote

On this side of the Atlantic, belugas come as far south as the Gulf of St. Lawrence. But they are usually seen in groups, and I've never heard of one jumping. They are one of the slower swimming whales.

Then of course there's this Beluga.
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rynner
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PostPosted: 25-07-2002 05:18    Post subject: Reply with quote

naitaka wrote:

On this side of the Atlantic, belugas come as far south as the Gulf of St. Lawrence. But they are usually seen in groups, and I've never heard of one jumping. They are one of the slower swimming whales.

Then of course there's this Beluga.


I like the pic - surprising similar!

Although the Gulf of St.Lawrence is a similar latitude to the Bay of Biscay, it's much warmer this side of the Atlantic because of Ocean currents, so what you say confirms the idea that beluga are a cold water species.
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rynner
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PostPosted: 11-08-2002 08:27    Post subject: TV Today: Reply with quote

ITV, 1830-1930:
Survival Special on whales of the arctic, including belugas. Watch out for any jumping ones!
(This prog. is a repeat.)
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rynner
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PostPosted: 12-07-2003 20:52    Post subject: Reply with quote

White whale returns (with pic)
Quote:
HE is the great white whale. In myth – and in reality – he would once have been the first shot by hunters because of his striking colour.

Today, he inspires fierce scientific competition – if for nothing else than out of rivalry between researchers who all want to claim to have seen him first.

Yesterday, they got their chance.

A young albino humpback whale that has made mysterious appearances along the NSW coast for the past 10 years resurfaced again off Tweed Heads.

Sightings have been few and far between. Yesterday was the first time in three years that the whale had been spotted. Before that it was in 1998 and earlier in 1996 off Sydney that it was last seen.

"All of us involved in the seas have grown up with the tale of Moby Dick," Southern Cross University's Whale Research Centre head Dr David Lloyd said.

"And so you see this great white whale and it is so distinct and it is quite exciting.

"We have competitions for the first to see it. It still captures our imagination as researchers."

Wayne Marsh of Spirit of the Sea cruises said the animal put on a dramatic show to announce his return.

"[He] was like a stage actor that knew [he] was on centre stage," he said.

"There were 15 other whales with [him] and they moved out of the way and let [him] perform."

Identifying marks on the 30-tonne animal's fluke have confirmed the young male adult is the same animal from previous sightings.

Its albinism is caused by the same process as in other animals – a genetic flaw that prevents it from producing skin pigments.

But researchers are still uncertain as to whether it would be more prone to skin cancer, as are other mammals with the same features.

Sightings from the Cape Byron research station show an increase in the number of whales this year but Sydney has experienced a drop of 350 so far.

"This suggests several things," National Parks and Wildlife Service wildlife manager Geoff Luscombe said.

"They may have chosen different pathways or just moved more offshore.

"Sea temperatures in Sydney have been warm in-shore this year."

Mr Luscombe said he last saw the white whale in 1996 off Cape Solander.

"It certainly is elusive. We have been looking for it," he said.

"Albinism is rare in nature because it is a genetic variant."

The white whale is heading north up the Queensland coast on its annual migration.

"We had an observation a couple of years ago but it has been five years since I have seen it," Dr Lloyd said.

"We are confident it is the same animal.

"We are interested to get DNA from loose skin it may leave in the water so we can keep a reference. By that we can see if he has any breeding success.

"I still get a buzz out of seeing it.

"In the old days of whaling he would have been the first one targeted. He simply stands out in a crowd."

Researchers know it is a male as they are the only ones that sing.

The whale was last sighted off Moreton Island near Brisbane three years ago.

"It's an amazing experience," Mr Marsh said. "Every time there was applause on the boat [he] took another curtain call and splashed [his] tail."
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Anonymous
PostPosted: 15-07-2003 11:04    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mind you, Great White Sharks only breach in one particular area (a bay somewhere off Spain isn't it?) - so maybe Belugas do the same?
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lopaka3Offline
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PostPosted: 04-04-2004 18:16    Post subject: The Albino Catfish Nobody Wanted... Reply with quote

I'm not even sure this is a 'Fortean News Story, but there's something about this, taken all-together, that just doesn't seem to add up. Or at least reads very disjointedly.-lopaka
--------------------------------------------------------------
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Florida anglers couldn't find museum, aquarium to take albino catfish

By Don Wilson - The Orlando Sentinel

Sunday, April 4, 2004

Some people put rubber duckies in their bathtubs, others floating aromatherapy candles.

For two days, James A. Holt had a catfish in the guest bathtub of his Orlando home.

It wasn't just any catfish but what they thought was a rare, born-in-the-wild, albino channel catfish 27 inches long -- one worth saving from its most serious predator: man.

Albino catfish are rare in the wild because they stand out in a lake like a halogen spotlight. Usually they're eaten by something larger before they grow more than a few inches.

The Holts' efforts to find it a safe haven were fruitless. And, just maybe, unnecessary.

Holt's son, James R. Holt, caught the fish in the small lake that borders his dad's back yard.

The younger Holt, 16, is a catfish fancier and has six tropical species, including an albino channel cat, among the other tropicals in his nine aquariums.

When he saw the fish, his first thought was to save it.

"He was swimming all around the surface eating all kinds of things, so I cast out a line with a piece of bologna on it and he bit," he said. "I didn't want to see him become a dinner. . . . This is the biggest one I've ever seen."

While the fish swam in a bathtub filled with lake water oxygenated by six battery-powered bait-bucket aerators, the elder Holt started phoning places such as SeaWorld and Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World to find the fish a safe haven in an aquarium large enough to give it at least a sense of freedom.

"Nobody returned my calls," the elder Holt said.

The chances of an albino born in the wild, experts say, are so remote that the Holts' fish probably was produced by a fish farm and stocked in the lake.

The Holts decided they had no choice. The fish had to go back into the lake and take its chances on landing on someone's dinner plate.

Ironically, that's probably the only reason it was born.

"Most likely it came from a fish farm," said Frank Chapman, a professor of fish biology at the University of Florida. "They sell them to these places where you pay to catch your own fish."

Or it could have been an aquarium fish that was dumped into the lake.

Copyright © 2004 The Lawrence Journal-World. All rights reserved.
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Mighty_EmperorOffline
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PostPosted: 14-04-2004 17:56    Post subject: What do you call a zebra with no stripes? Reply with quote

Now I would have assumed it would be a horse but clearly not Wink

Quote:
Stripeless zebra baffles experts

Updated 13 April 2004, 14.54


An all-white zebra has been discovered in Kenya, Africa, and wildlife experts don't know why it's got no stripes.

Paul Gaithu, from Nairobi National Park said: "We don't have any records of ever having seen one like this before."

The little zebra, who's only a calf, will be left with its parents to grow up, while vets try to figure out why it's such an unusual shade.

Mr Gaithu said: "We are monitoring it every day. We hope that it will grow to an adult zebra that we can see."

The stripeless zebra seems to be fitting in well with his black and white friends.

Lots of zebras have recently arrived in the park with the annual migration, but it's thought that the unusual calf was born there.

Some types of zebras are endangered, as they are hunted for their meat and skins.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/cbbcnews/hi/animals/newsid_3622000/3622713.stm

Emps
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Anonymous
PostPosted: 15-04-2004 00:13    Post subject: Reply with quote

You call it an albino. Smile
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WhistlingJackOffline
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PostPosted: 15-04-2004 00:56    Post subject: Reply with quote

If I were a lion, I suppose I'd call it lunch... Wink
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Jerry_BOffline
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PostPosted: 15-04-2004 11:34    Post subject: Reply with quote

An all-white zebra has been discovered in Kenya, Africa, and wildlife experts don't know why it's got no stripes.

Is it my imagination, but is that rather poor grammar (especially for a kid's site)...?
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Anonymous
PostPosted: 15-04-2004 14:59    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you look at the photo it does have stripes, just very faint grey ones instead of the normal black ones. Looks like a similar mutation to the ones which cause different colour phases in the cat family, eg. ginger domestic cats, black leopards or white tigers. I think it's www.messybeast.com that has a lot of info about coat colour mutations.
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Anonymous
PostPosted: 15-04-2004 15:31    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe it's an omen...along the lines of the White Buffalo??heh
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