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Albino Animals
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 29-03-2010 15:14    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fats_Tuesday wrote:
Yet another misuse of the word "twitcher" by lazy journalists. Why is it so hard for them to get the distinction between twitchers and birdwatchers?
Harumph,
Disgruntled birdwatcher (not a twitcher)

Well, that seems to be the description she applied to herself:
Quote:
Avid bird watcher Fiona said in six years of 'twitching' it was the first time she had ever seen anything like it.

Not that it's anything I expect to lose sleep over... Cool

Going completely off-topic, last night I was speaking to someone who reckoned that Romanies and Gypsies are completely different groups and should not be confused. Not according to the dictionary they aren't! Wink
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Fats_TuesdayOffline
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PostPosted: 29-03-2010 15:23    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's a possibility she's an actual twitcher, but in past experience with the press, they always like to attach the label to anyone who's interested in birds. It wouldn't even surprise me if the lady has mistakenly picked this up herself and is mislabelling herself.

I haven't slept properly in 10 years because of this and before that, I couldn't sleep because of people pausing and saying "Not!" after statements. I think I need to worry less about language and see this as just another interesting example of its evolution.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 03-09-2010 08:04    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mylor fisherman catches rare albino devil crab
8:20am Friday 3rd September 2010

By James Toseland - Falmouth Penryn Packet »

A rare albino devil swimming crab has been hauled up in the pots of a Mylor fisherman.

The white crustacean, which also has red eyes, was caught by Cameron Henry who fishes on the Peter John II.

The velvet swimming crab – which is also known as a devil or witch crab - was caught about a quarter of a mile out to sea, south of Flushing Quay.

Realising the rarity of his catch, Mr Henry contacted staff at the Blue Reef Aquarium in Newquay where it is now on display.

“Albino crustaceans in general are extremely rare, however no one here has ever heard of an albino swimming crab,” said Blue Reef’s David Waines.

“Normally these types of crab are a deep blue or purple colour so to get one like this is very unusual indeed.

“As well as being rare white or albino crustaceans do not tend to survive for long in the wild as they rely on their natural camouflage to protect them from predators.

“However devil crabs are renowned for their extremely aggressive behaviour and it may be that in spite of being such an obvious target this particular crab was able to fight off would-be hunters.

“Although they rarely exceed 10cms in length they will try and attack even the largest intruder including humans, waving their claws violently from side to side,” he added.

Velvet swimming crabs get their name from the fact that their shells are covered with dense, velvety hair and they are also able to use their paddle-like hind legs to swim away from attackers like cuttlefish.

They are found from northern Norway to the Mediterranean and the Black Sea living on rocky shores below the low tide mark and are often found lying in wait under stones in rockpools.

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/fpfalmouth/8369438.Mylor_fisherman_catches_rare_albino_devil_crab/

It "was caught about a quarter of a mile out to sea, south of Flushing Quay"- that's hardly 'out to sea'; it's the mouth of the Penryn River! Wink
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gyrtrashOffline
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PostPosted: 09-01-2011 20:57    Post subject: Reply with quote

A ginger/orange alligator that they're saying is "almost an albino"...

See what you think: Article with photo and video
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FluttermothOffline
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PostPosted: 09-01-2011 21:40    Post subject: Reply with quote

My best guess would be that it's xanthic.

Xanthism can have many causes, but the most normal is a genetic anomoly that stops the dark black/brown pigmentation developing, leaving just the red/yellow. A true albino would have no pigment at all.
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gyrtrashOffline
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PostPosted: 10-01-2011 18:21    Post subject: Reply with quote

My first thought was that it'd been rolling about in mud by an 'iron spring' or 'Chalybeate spring/well'...
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 26-09-2011 11:08    Post subject: Reply with quote

Haven't I seen you somewhere before? Albino squirrel goes nuts for its own reflection
By Daniel Miller
Last updated at 1:25 PM on 25th September 2011

This albino squirrel clearly thinks she's the fairest of them all after rescue-centre staff named her Snow White and placed a mirror in her enclosure.
The plucky critter was saved from certain death after being attacked by two grey squirrels who wanted to banish her from their woodland.

She was taken to the Hart Wildlife Rescue near Alton in Hampshire where staff named her Snow White after unusual appearance.
Caragh Hunter, Senior Clinical Assistant at the centre said: 'She had blood coming from her nose and was in a very poor way when she came in.
'We put a small mirror in her cage so we could keep an eye on her wherever she was hiding.
'She began looking in it almost straight away. After three days on painkillers and antibiotics she was right as rain.

'We have now moved her to a larger enclosure and given her a bigger mirror. She just loves looking at herself in it.
'I'm sure she's asking the mirror 'who is the fairest of them all?

'In the fairy tale, Snow White marries her prince and becomes the new Queen - she's certainly become queen of hart.
'Albinos don't have very good eyesight - and are often picked on by others in the wild.
'She's been with us for a few weeks now and will soon be off to a squirrel sanctuary where she'll be able to spend the rest of her days in safety.'

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2041612/Albino-squirrel-goes-nuts-reflection.html#ixzz1Z3VJqlg3
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 29-09-2011 12:09    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Rare white whale calf spotted off Australia
http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-09-rare-white-whale-calf-australia.html
September 29th, 2011 in Biology / Plants & Animals

This September 24, 2011 picture released by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority shows a white humpback whale calf breaching in Cid Harbour in the Whitsunday Islands area near Australia's Great Barrier Reef.

An extremely rare white humpback whale calf has been spotted near Australia's Great Barrier Reef in an event witnesses described Thursday as a "once in a lifetime experience".

Believed to be just a few weeks old, the baby humpback was seen at Cid Harbour in the famous reef's Whitsunday Islands area by local man Wayne Fewings, who was with his family in a boat when he spotted a whale pod.
"We were just drifting when I noticed the smaller whale in the pod was white. I couldn’t believe my eyes, and I just grabbed my camera," Fewings said.
"Then the white calf approached my boat, seeming to want to check us out. I was just so amazed at seeing this animal, it made me think how truly astounding the Great Barrier Reef is," he added of the sighting on Saturday.
"I feel very lucky to have witnessed this, it's a once in a lifetime experience."
Reef official Mark Read said white whales were highly unusual, with only 10-15 believed to exist among the 10,000-15,000 humpbacks living along Australia's east coast, and purely white ones -- like the calf spotted on Saturday -- rarer still.
Its parents could both have been dark humpbacks carrying the recessive white whale gene, but Read said one or either may also have been white themselves, raising speculation it was the offspring of famous white humpback Migaloo.
Migaloo -- the name is an Aboriginal word meaning "whitefella" -- is the world's best-known all-white humpback and has built up a loyal following in Australia since first being sighted in 1991.
Read said it was impossible to speculate on the baby humpback's parentage without genetic tests to compare with samples taken from Migaloo.
"There is another couple of purely white whales and then there's a very very low number of animals that are a sort of blotchy colour," Read told AFP.
"It is pretty unusual, but we'd be purely speculating in terms of relationships to Migaloo."
Humpback whales are currently on their southern migration and Read said the baby white would be feeding heavily from its mother as it laid down fat stores for the "cold Antarctic waters."
Its sex was unknown and Read said there were no plans to bestow the young mammal with a name of its own.
"We'd be pretty comfortable for him or her just to simply remain anonymous and just live out its life in relative peace and harmony," Read said.
Australia's east coast humpback population has been brought back from the brink of extinction following the halting of whaling in the early 1960s, he added, describing it as a "conservation success story."
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 19-10-2011 09:09    Post subject: Reply with quote

Eye am for real: One-eyed albino shark-clops 'is not a fake', say experts
By Sara Nelson
Last updated at 7:30 PM on 18th October 2011

A fisherman has discovered what appears to be a shark with a single eye in the centre of its face.
The albino ‘cyclops’ fetus was cut from the belly of a pregnant bull shark caught in the Gulf of California this summer.
The one-eyed shark has achieved cult status since Pisces Fleet Sportfishing published pictures of it in July, giving rise to rumours of Photoshopping or other hoaxes.

But shark researchers who have examined the creature say it is genuine, although it is unlikely it would have survived after birth, MSNBC reported.
Shark expert Felipe Galvan Magana, of Mexico’s Centro Interdisciplinario de Ciencias del Mar, said: ‘This is extremely rare. As far as I know, less than 50 examples of an abnormality like this have been recorded.’

The shark’s condition is known as cyclopia, and is a rare congenital disorder characterised by the failure of the front portion of the brain to properly divide the orbits of the eye into two cavities.
Cyclopia occurs within the spectrum of brain and face defects known as holoprosencephaly, which in severe cases can result in miscarriage or stillbirth.

In 2005 a kitten born with only one eye and no nose caused a similar online stir.
The feline, one of two in a litter, became known as Cy (short for Cyclops) and died within a day

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2050397/One-eyed-albino-cyclops-shark-discovered-fisherman.html#ixzz1bDVl37z0
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Amy82Offline
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PostPosted: 15-11-2011 14:47    Post subject: Reply with quote

Albinos have always fascinated me since I was young. I always dreamed to own a albino squirrel as a pet, therefore you cannot imagine how happy these pictures have made me! Smile

The one eyed albino shark (and feline) are the opposite: They frighten me somehow. It might be a disorder, but it looks really scary! Like a little alien!
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marionXXXOffline
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PostPosted: 08-12-2011 07:33    Post subject: Reply with quote

They are calling this seal albino though it might be caused by a different mutation (technically any albino 'colour' is caused by a mutation of TYRP, it won't necessarily be white, and a white animal isn't necessarily albino).

http://www.couriermail.com.au/entertainment/weird/sealed-with-love-shunned-albino-pup-rescued/story-e6frep26-1226139266124
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 08-12-2011 08:14    Post subject: Reply with quote

marionXXX wrote:
They are calling this seal albino though it might be caused by a different mutation (technically any albino 'colour' is caused by a mutation of TYRP, it won't necessarily be white, and a white animal isn't necessarily albino).

http://www.couriermail.com.au/entertainment/weird/sealed-with-love-shunned-albino-pup-rescued/story-e6frep26-1226139266124

I posted the Mail version of this story back in September:
http://www.forteantimes.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=1138795#1138795
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marionXXXOffline
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PostPosted: 08-12-2011 11:16    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't read the news sections.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 23-04-2012 06:21    Post subject: Reply with quote

They're not calling this Orca an albino, but as the White Whales thread got scrunched into here, here will have to do for this story:

White killer whale adult spotted for first time in wild
By Richard Black, Environment correspondent, BBC News

Scientists have made what they believe to be the first sighting of an adult white orca, or killer whale.
The adult male, which they have nicknamed Iceberg, was spotted off the coast of Kamchatka in eastern Russia.
It appears to be healthy and leading a normal life in its pod.

White whales of various species are occasionally seen; but the only known white orcas have been young, including one with a rare genetic condition that died in a Canadian aquarium in 1972.

The sightings were made during a research cruise off Kamchatka by a group of Russian scientists and students, co-led by Erich Hoyt, the long-time orca scientist, conservationist and author who is now a senior research fellow with the Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society (WDCS).
"We've seen another two white orcas in Russia but they've been young, whereas this is the first time we've seen a mature adult," he told BBC News.
"It has the full two-metre-high dorsal fin of a mature male, which means it's at least 16 years old - in fact the fin is somewhat ragged, so it might be a bit older."
Orcas mature around the age of 15, and males can live to 50 or 60 years old, though 30 is more commonplace.

"Iceberg seems to be fully socialised; we know that these fish-eating orcas stay with their mothers for life, and as far as we can see he's right behind his mother with presumably his brothers next to him," said Dr Hoyt.

The cause of his unusual pigmentation is not known. The captive white orca, Chima, suffered from Chediak-Higashi syndrome, a genetic condition that causes partial albinism as well as a number of medical complications.

It is possible that an attempt may be made to take a biopsy from Iceberg; but with researchers reluctant to do so unless there is a compelling conservation reason, they are hoping instead for closer observations including a detection of eye colour.

The project Dr Hoyt co-leads, the Far East Russia Orca Project, has pioneered visual and acoustic monitoring in the inhospitable Kamchatka seas, and has produced a number of papers on the communication of killer whales.
This may lead to improved understanding of the animals' complex social structure, which includes matrilineal family clans, pods consisting of several families, and much larger "super-pods".
A related project aims to study and conserve habitat for all whales and dolphins around the Russian coast.

In recent years a white humpback whale nick-named Migaloo has drawn intense interest in Australia, while the Arctic beluga is naturally white.
The most famous white whale, though, is the fictional sperm whale that drove Captain Ahab to his eventually fatal fury in Moby Dick.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-17783603
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lordmongroveOffline
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PostPosted: 23-04-2012 19:57    Post subject: Reply with quote

At the other end of the colour range i one saw a totaly black giraffe at Lake Manyara, Tanzania in 1985.
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