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Boko Haram Islamist Cult
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 29-07-2009 12:59    Post subject: Boko Haram Islamist Cult Reply with quote

This is the first I've heard of this cult holding hostages.

Quote:
Hostages freed in Nigeria clashes
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/8174399.stm

Bodies of suspected Islamists lay outside Maiduguri's police HQ
Police in Nigeria have freed more than 180 women and children from a house in the north of the country where they had been held by a radical Islamist sect.

They told the BBC they were held for six days and lived on dates and water.

They were rescued in Maiduguri, where heavy fighting continues between troops and militants of the Boko Haram sect.

Boko Haram is blamed for attacks on police stations and government sites in northern Nigeria, triggering violence that has killed at least 150 people.

The women and children were said to have been abducted from the town of Bauchi, where the violence erupted on Sunday.





Nigeria's 'Taliban' enigma
Eyewitness: Nigeria attacks
Fear and tension after attack
Boko Haram is led by Mohammed Yusuf, who has his base in Maiduguri, capital of Borno province.

Security forces flooded into Maiduguri and began attacking Mohammed Yusuf's compound on Tuesday, shelling it with heavy weapons and exchanging gunfire with militants.

The fierce fighting continued through the night and into Wednesday.

The officer commanding the operation, Col Ben Ahanotu, told the BBC the militants were well-armed and keeping up a steady stream of fire.

He said there were at least 250 armed men guarding Mohammed Yusuf's home, also the headquarters of the sect.

'Foreigners'

There were about another 1,000 people inside the enclave, all believed to be followers of Boko Haram.

Col Ahanotu also said that papers and personal items found on the bodies of the young men that have been killed indicated that many of them were not Nigerian and appear to have come from neighbouring Chad and Niger.


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President Yar'Adua said 'a potentially dangerous problem' had been tackled
Four states in northern Nigeria have been affected by the violence involving Boko Haram - Borno, Bauchi, Kano and Yobe.

Boko Haram is against Western education. It believes Nigeria's government is being corrupted by Western ideas and wants to see Islamic law imposed across Nigeria. President Umaru Yar'Adua has ordered Nigeria's national security agencies to take all necessary action to contain and repel attacks by the extremists.

"These people have been organising, penetrating our societies, procuring arms, learning how to make explosives and bombs to disturb the peace and force abuse on the rest of Nigerians," he said before departing on a trip to Brazil.


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The aftermath of gun battles with the militants

Maiduguri police said 103 had died in the violence in the city, including 90 members of Boko Haram.

In Bauchi, scene of the first bloodshed on Sunday, 176 people remain under arrest. At least 39 people were killed in Bauchi.

Sharia law is in place across northern Nigeria, but there is no history of al-Qaeda-linked violence in the country.

The country's 150 million people are split almost equally between Muslims in the north and Christians in the south.



1. Edit to fix title.
2. Edit to fix title.


Last edited by ramonmercado on 18-06-2011 13:22; edited 2 times in total
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 29-07-2009 13:46    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
150 die as Nigerian Islamist groups go on the rampage

MAIDUGURI, Nigeria – Thousands of Nigerians sheltered in barracks in the northern city of Maiduguri yesterday after days of clashes involving Muslim rebels which have killed at least 150 people across four states.

Members of a local Islamic group have burned churches, police stations and a prison and set off petrol bombs near residential areas in the unrest. Local police said 103 people, most of them rioters, had been killed in Maiduguri alone.

The rioters are supporters of a radical Islamic preacher opposed to western education, who critics say has whipped some students and illiterate, jobless youths into an anti-establishment frenzy over a period of years.

The latest unrest was triggered when some members of the group called Boko Haram, which wants a wider adoption of Islamic sharia law across Africa’s most populous nation, were arrested in Bauchi state. Violence then spread to the states of Kano, Yobe and Borno, of which Maiduguri is the capital.

“When we heard shooting and saw people running we just packed the family and joined them,” said Sunny Nwankwo, a journalist who fled to one of two barracks in Maiduguri sheltering thousands of civilians.

Residents said youths armed with machetes, knives, bows and arrows, locally made hunting rifles and home-made explosives had attacked police buildings and anyone resembling a police officer or government official, causing hundreds of families to flee.

Isa Azare, spokesman for Maiduguri police command, said 90 of the rioters as well as eight police officers, three prison officials and two soldiers had been killed. – (Reuters)

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/world/2009/0729/1224251576585.html
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segovius
PostPosted: 29-07-2009 20:20    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am really glad that finally the word 'cult' is being used.

Cults have always existed and from the Thugs to Hassan i Sabah to Charles Manson they have killed people and oppressed people. It's what they do.

The sad fact of the matter is that the 'Islamist Threat' is a massive lie perpetuated on the public for gain by various governments. And they did gain....across the board.

Al Qaeda is just a cult. The Taleban are just a cult. Aum was just a cult.

But Aum was never portrayed as part of a 'Buddhist Threat' because there was no gain. But it is the same thing. Exactly the same.

Maybe we are starting to stop being lied to. Good news.
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 30-07-2009 09:49    Post subject: Reply with quote

I deliberately added Cult to the headline. Unfortunately its not in the original BBC headline.
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PostPosted: 31-07-2009 12:40    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Islamist death 'good for Nigeria'
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/8177681.stm

The BBC has seen images of the dead body of Mohammed Yusuf. WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT


In pictures

A Nigerian government minister has expressed relief at the death of an Islamic sect leader whose capture police announced on Thursday.

But Information Minister Dora Akunyili told the BBC the government "does not condone extra-judicial killings".

Human rights campaigners have voiced concern at Mohammed Yusuf's death.

The group he led has been blamed for days of violent unrest. Hundreds of people have died in clashes between his followers and security forces.

His group - known as Boko Haram or Taliban - wants to overthrow the Nigerian government and impose a strict version of Islamic law.

The bullet-riddled body of Mohammed Yusuf, 39, was seen hours after police announced he had been captured in the northern city of Maiduguri.

The BBC's Bilkisu Babangida says the city is returning to normal, with shops and banks re-opening.

She says many residents are happy that Mr Yusuf is dead.

'Shocking'

Information Minister Dora Akunyili told the BBC's Network Africa that she was concerned about the death and that the government would find out "exactly what happened".

However Mohammed Yusuf's demise was "positive" for Nigeria, she added.

"What is important is that he [Yusuf] has been taken out of the way, to stop him using people to cause mayhem."


AT THE SCENE

Bilkisu Babangida
BBC News, Maiduguri
At about 1600 I was about to leave for home with the rest of the journalists. We received a phone call to return back to the government house because the man, Mohammed Yusuf, had been captured.
So we rushed up to that place. We heard some gunshots from somewhere, then we were told that the man had been "executed" at the police headquarters, at about 1900.

They kept us waiting, they kept all the newsmen away from the scene.

I saw a video and after that I rushed to the police headquarters and I saw the corpse. I even photographed the corpse of Mohammed Yusuf.

She accused Mr Yusuf of "brainwashing" youths to cause trouble.

Ms Akunyili praised the security forces, saying they had managed to stop the violence spreading even further and that normality was returning to the region.

Human Rights Watch staff said there should be an immediate investigation into the case.

"The extrajudicial killing of Mr Yusuf in police custody is a shocking example of the brazen contempt by the Nigerian police for the rule of law," said Eric Guttschuss, of the New York-based rights group.

Another Human Rights Watch researcher, Corinne Dufka, told AP news agency: "The Nigerian authorities must act immediately to investigate and hold to account all those responsible for this unlawful killing and any others associated with the recent violence in northern Nigeria."

'Trying to escape'

Troops had stormed Boko Haram's stronghold in the north-eastern city of Maiduguri on Wednesday night, killing many of the militants and forcing others to flee.





No surprise at Nigeria killing
In pictures: Clashes aftermath
Nigeria's 'Taliban' enigma
Islamist death: Your reaction
Mr Yusuf was arrested the following day after reportedly being found hiding in a goat pen at his parents-in-law's house.

Later, a BBC reporter in the city was among journalists shown two films - one apparently showing Mr Yusuf making a confession, the other showing what appeared to be his body, riddled with bullets.

"Mohammed Yusuf was killed by security forces in a shoot-out while trying to escape," the regional police assistant inspector-general, Moses Anegbode, told Nigerian television.

A spokesman for the state governor was also quoted as saying that Mr Yusuf had been trying to escape.

One policeman told AFP news agency Mr Yusuf had "pleaded for mercy and forgiveness before he was shot."

'Inspirational'

The violence began on Sunday night in Bauchi state, before spreading to other towns and cities in the northeast of the West African nation.

Crowds of militants tried to storm government buildings and the city's police headquarters, but dozens of them were shot dead by security forces.

Several days of gun battles between militants and Nigerian security forces ensued, culminating in the assault on the militant's stronghold.

It is thought more than 300 people have died in the violence - some estimates say 600, although there has been no official confirmation.

The Red Cross said about 3,500 people had fled the fighting and were being housed in their camp.

Witnesses and human rights groups have accused the military of excessive violence in quelling the militants, but the army says it used a minimal amount of force.

Police say Mr Yusuf was a preacher from Yobe state, who had four wives and 12 children.

They described him as a inspirational character.

His sect, Boko Haram, is against Western education. It believes Nigeria's government is being corrupted by Western ideas and wants to see Islamic law imposed across Nigeria.
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PostPosted: 01-08-2009 17:20    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Nigeria seeks last sect members
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/8179747.stm


Nigerian security forces are searching houses in Maiduguri to find remaining members of an Islamist sect blamed for violence which left hundreds dead.

Bodies have been littering the streets, causing concern about risks to health.

Controversy continues over the death of the leader of the Boko Haram sect, Mohammed Yusuf.

The police say he was killed in a shootout while he was being detained. But an army commander says he was captured, and handed over, alive.

A BBC reporter in Maiduguri says the city is beginning to return to normal, with shops and banks re-opening. But, she says, there are still decomposing bodies on the streets.

She adds that many residents are happy that Mr Yusuf, who led the Boko Haram sect, is dead.

Col Ben Ahanotu, the commander of the operation against the Boko Haram group, said he had personally captured Mr Yusuf, 39, and handed him over to the chief of police.

He said Mr Yusuf was unarmed when caught, hiding in an empty building a short distance from his enclave, and that he gave himself up willingly.

Col Ahanotu said Mr Yusuf had a wound on his arm which had already been treated.

"But he was OK. As I got him alive, I handed him over to the authorities," he said.

A Nigerian police officer points at a corpse in the northern city of Maiduguri on 29 July 2009
The security forces are searching houses and people in Maiduguri

Regional police assistant inspector-general, Moses Anegbode, had earlier told Nigerian television Mr Yusuf had been "killed by security forces in a shoot-out while trying to escape".

Human rights campaigners have alleged Mr Yusuf was shot by the police.

His bullet-riddled body was shown to journalists on Thursday just hours after police said they had captured him in Maiduguri.

The BBC reporter in the city was among journalists shown two films - one apparently showing Mr Yusuf making a confession, the other showing what appeared to be his body, riddled with bullets.

One policeman told AFP Mr Yusuf had "pleaded for mercy and forgiveness before he was shot."

Nigeria's Information Minister Dora Akunyili told the BBC that how Mr Yusuf had died was "a big issue to the good people of this country because Nigeria believes in the rule of law, Nigeria believes in fundamental human rights being respected".

She said his death would be investigated but that the security agencies should be "commended for being able to bring to a stop this killing and destruction in just a few days".


map

No surprise at Nigeria killing
In pictures: Clashes aftermath
Nigeria's 'Taliban' enigma
Islamist death: Your reaction

Rights groups have condemned the alleged manner of Mr Yusuf's death.

Human Rights Watch said there should be an immediate investigation into the case, which it has described as an "extrajudicial killing".

Amnesty International said that anyone responsible for or tolerating illegal killings should be brought to justice.

Boko Haram - also known locally as Taliban - wants to overthrow the Nigerian government and impose a strict version of Islamic law.

Troops stormed Boko Haram's stronghold in the north-eastern city of Maiduguri on Wednesday night, killing many of the militants and forcing others to flee.

'Excessive force'

The violence began on Sunday night in Bauchi state, before spreading to other towns and cities in the north-east of the West African nation. Crowds of militants tried to storm government buildings and the city's police headquarters, but dozens of them were shot dead by security forces.

Several days of gun battles between militants and Nigerian security forces ensued, culminating in the assault on the militant's stronghold.

It is thought more than 300 people have died in the violence - some estimates say 600, although there has been no official confirmation.

The Red Cross said about 3,500 people had fled the fighting and were being housed in their camp.

Police say Mr Yusuf was a preacher from Yobe state, who had four wives and 12 children.

Boko Haram opposes Western education. It believes Nigeria's government is being corrupted by Western ideas and wants to see Islamic law imposed across Nigeria.
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PostPosted: 03-08-2009 17:24    Post subject: Reply with quote

Whatever you think of this cult, extra-judicial executions by the police cannot be excused. If they get away with this then they will do the same to trade unionists, civil rights campaigners etc.


Quote:
Sect leader 'alive when captured'
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/8180475.stm


Mohammed Yusuf, bare-chested and with a bandage on his arm, surrounded by soldiers
The photograph shows Mohammed Yusuf in army custody

The BBC has obtained a photograph which shows that Mohammed Yusuf, the leader of the Boko Haram sect in Nigeria, was alive when captured by the army.

They handed him over to the police. A few hours later, journalists were shown his bullet-ridden body.

The police said he had been fatally wounded while trying to evade capture.

Mr Yusuf's Islamic sect is blamed for days of violent clashes with security forces across northern Nigeria, which killed hundreds of people.

Human Rights Watch in Nigeria have called for an immediate investigation into the killing of Mr Yusuf, 39, which they called "extrajudicial" and "illegal".

On Friday, the army commander of the operation against the Boko Haram group, Col Ben Ahanoto, said he had personally captured Mr Yusuf and handed him over to the chief of police in Maiduguri, the capital of Borno state.

He said Mr Yusuf had a wound in his arm - which is clearly shown in the photograph - which had already been treated.

The police, however, insisted he had been fatally wounded in combat.

The abducted women huddle together in the shade, with one child standing in shabby clothing
Officials said the group were in a deplorable state

The police commissioner of Borno state, Christopher Dega, said Mr Yusuf "was in a hideout, and the forces went there and there was an exchange of fire".

"In the course of that confrontation, he sustained his own injury. He was picked up and he later couldn't make it."

Earlier, police sources had offered a different version of events, saying Mr Yusuf was killed while trying to escape from custody.

Meanwhile, another group of women and children, abducted by the Boko Haram sect, has been rescued from a locked house in Maiduguri.

Officials said the latest group of 140 was in a deplorable condition, suffering from pneumonia, fever and rashes.

Last week, the police rescued about 100 young women and children from a house on the edge of the city. Many said they were the wives of sect members, and had been forced to travel to Maiduguri from Bauchi state.

The BBC reporter in Maiduguri says the Boko Haram sect believed that their families should accompany them to the battlefield.


map

No surprise at Nigeria killing
In pictures: Clashes aftermath
Nigeria's 'Taliban' enigma
Islamist death: Your reaction

Hundreds of people were killed in Maiduguri alone during violent clashes between police and the Islamic sect.

Col Ben Ahanotu, head of security in Maiduguri, said that mass burials had begun there.

The Boko Haram compound, he said, was being used as one of the burial sites because bodies were decomposing in the heat.

Life in the affected areas is now beginning to return to normal with banks and markets reopening.

Maiduguri is the capital of Borno state but the fighting spread to cities across the north of the country and the total number of dead is unknown.

A military spokesman said two of those killed were soldiers and 13 were police officers.

The number of injured, meanwhile, is still being counted. The Red Cross had earlier said about 3,500 people fled the fighting.

The violence ended on Thursday with the death of Mr Yusuf.
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PostPosted: 07-08-2009 13:24    Post subject: Reply with quote

Importantly in the midst of their own grief the Christians are also concerned about the manner in which Boko Haram died: Tina Lambert, CSW’s Advocacy Director said:
Quote:
“We are disturbed by indications that the Boko Haram leader may have been killed extra-judicially."


Quote:
Nigeria - Christians lament a lack of international concern over Boko Haram bloodshed
http://dynamic.csw.org.uk/article.asp?t=press&id=894
06/08/2009

Mens tent in IDP camp set up after Bauchi town violence
Christians in the northern Nigerian city of Maiduguri are expressing increasing dismay at what they perceive as a lack of international concern for the suffering of their communities. As funerals continue, local estimates of the death toll rise to over 1000.

During last week’s violence, Islamist Boko Haram militants attacked both government and Christian targets, killing individuals and taking many civilians captive for possible use as human shields against government forces besieging their compound in Maiduguri’s Railway District. Once in the camp, male captives were given a choice between conversion to Islam or death, while women and girls were kept on as hostages. Survivors of the siege informed CSW sources that the Boko Haram leader, Yusuf Mohammed, personally oversaw the forcible Islamisation of hostages, and the execution of anyone who refused to convert.

Yesterday, Maiduguri’s Good News Church held a memorial service for one of these hostages. Pastor George Orji was beheaded in the Boko Haram compound, and his body left in a mass grave there. He leaves behind a heavily pregnant wife, and two children aged two and four.

On 4 August around 3000 people took part in the funeral service for Rev Sabo Yakubu, the Church of Christ in Nigeria (COCIN) church pastor whose heart was removed from his body by Boko Haram militants. Three other Christians whose charred remains were found in the ruins of Jajere National Evangelical Mission were also buried on that day. One of the bodies is thought to be that of Pastor Elijah Samuel, who was hacked to death by militants.

Over 800 people are now officially estimated to have died in last week’s violence. This number is likely to rise as many missing civilians are now presumed dead and possibly buried in mass graves dug by the authorities in a bid to avert the spread of disease. Earlier CSW was informed that a University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital (UMTH) worker had estimated that around 1000 corpses were deposited in the hospital mortuary on Monday 27 July alone. The number of people displaced during the violence also remains unclear, but is thought to be in the thousands.

CSW sources also report that a total of 20 churches were destroyed during the violence. In February 2006 Maiduguri was the scene of the infamous "Cartoon Riots" during which 57 churches were destroyed and over 60 Christians were killed. Surviving victims of that violence have still not received compensation.

Archbishop of Jos, Benjamin Kwashi said: "It is unfortunate that the mayhem unleashed on the Church is systematically downplayed in the media. The first victim was the ecclesia, which was subjugated and sacrificed prior to any attack on the establishment, yet no report is pointing to Christians as the number one target before all others. We will continue to speak out."

There are growing concerns that the furore surrounding the death of the Boko Haram leader may be obscuring the suffering inflicted by the sect on northern civilians, and may eventually raise him to iconic status. Yusuf Mohamed was reportedly killed in questionable circumstances on July 30 while in police custody. Local sources report that pictures purportedly of his bullet-riddled corpse show one of his arms was practically amputated by gunshots.

Tina Lambert, CSW’s Advocacy Director said: “We are disturbed by indications that the Boko Haram leader may have been killed extra-judicially. A full investigation into this claim is needed but it is vital that this does not inadvertently obscure or detract from the appalling nature of the crimes committed by this sect against innocent civilians. There is an urgent need to assist and compensate the deeply traumatised victims, and for action to ensure a definitive end to the cycle of deadly religious violence in Northern and central Nigeria”.
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PostPosted: 16-08-2009 14:41    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

Nigeria police raid Muslim sect
Nigeria map

Nigerian police have raided an isolated Muslim community in the western state of Niger, taking more than 600 people into custody.

A team of 1,000 officers took part in the Saturday morning raid on the Darul Islam community, local media say.

Police say no weapons were found and there was no resistance to the arrests.

The raid comes in the aftermath of the violent uprising of the Boko Haram Islamist group last month in which hundreds of people died.

A BBC correspondent says the authorities may be taking this opportunity to disperse the Darul Islam (or House of Islam) community.



We have not eaten anything since we were brought here and we have women and children among us
Darul Islam resident

The settlement was established in the early 1990s to live according to strict Islamic principles, away from what they see as western decadence.

After the recent bloodshed involving Boko Haram in the northern Nigerian city of Maiduguri, Darul Islam came under official scrutiny.

One of the men taken away by the police told the BBC Hausa service they were being questioned at a secondary school in Makwa, the nearest town.

He said: "We have not eaten anything since we were brought here and we have women and children among us."

"It was a team of security officers including policemen and immigration officers, operating under the instruction of the federal police command, who came to our village."

The inclusion of immigration officers is important, according to Mannir Dan-Ali, editor-in-chief of the Nigerian newspaper Daily Trust.

"The authorities are trying to establish the identity and nationality of the members of the Darul Islam community," he says.

Mr Dan-Ali says those found not be from Niger state may be asked to return to their home states within Nigeria.

"Although the group have not been found to be engaged in anything against the law, the authorities appear to be keen to take this opportunity to disperse the community," he told the BBC.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/8203832.stm
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PostPosted: 02-09-2009 15:36    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

Nigerian 'trained in Afghanistan'
Boko Haram sect member Abdulrasheed Abubakar, 23, who says he was trained in Afghanistan
Abdulrasheed Abubakar was paraded by police to make his statement

A member of the Nigerian Islamist sect behind a deadly uprising in July has confessed to receiving military training in Afghanistan, police say.

The member of the sect known locally as Boko Haram and Taliban said he had been paid $5,000 (£3,000) to do the training and promised $30,000 on his return.

The uprising in northern Nigeria left some 700 people dead, mostly militants.

If confirmed it will be the first proven link between Islamists in the oil-rich country and Afghanistan.

Local people called the group Taliban because of the radical beliefs.

For years Western diplomats have feared an al-Qaeda sleeper cell might launch attacks on oil infrastructure in Nigeria, which is an increasingly large supplier to the US.

Weapons cache

The man, 23-year-old Abdulrasheed Abubakar, was shown to the public in the Borno state capital Maiduguri, where the sect was based and which saw the worst violence.


Map

Is al-Qaeda working in Nigeria?

The police also displayed a large cache of weapons and bomb-making equipment recovered from suspected Boko Haram members recently arrested in the northern cities of Yola and Maiduguri.

In July the Boko Haram militants, armed mainly with machetes, launched the simultaneous attacks on police stations in different parts of the north.

Hundreds of them were killed as the security forces retaliated.

The sect said it was fighting against Western education and believed Nigeria's government was being corrupted by Western ideas.

It wanted to see Islamic law imposed across the country.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/8233980.stm
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PostPosted: 08-09-2010 12:23    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Gunmen free 800 inmates in Nigeria
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/breaking/2010/0908/breaking25.html
Wed, Sep 08, 2010

Heavily armed gunmen attacked a prison in the central Nigerian city of Bauchi last night, freeing as many as 800 inmates including suspected members of a militant Islamic sect, police said today.

State police commissioner Danlami Yar'Adua said the gunmen killed four people including two bodyguards and set part of the prison on fire.

He said everything possible was being done to track down the escaped prisoners.

“About 50 men with machine guns came to the prison site, forced the prison open and released all the prisoners," one Bauchi resident said.

Residents said the attackers were believed to be members of Boko Haram, a radical Islamic sect behind an uprising which killed hundreds of people in and around the northern city of Maiduguri a year ago.

Followers of Boko Haram - which means "Western education is sinful" in the Hausa language spoken across northern Nigeria - want Islamic sharia law imposed more widely across Africa's most populous nation.

The Bauchi prison was holding members of the sect who were detained after last year's uprising.

The killing of several policemen in recent weeks, and of two traditional rulers in the past week, had already raised fears in Maiduguri that Boko Haram was making a return

Security has been tightened in Maiduguri, with the police and army carrying out joint patrols and a dusk-to-dawn ban imposed on motorcycles, which have been used by gunmen to carry out the recent attacks.

Symbols of government authority, including police stations, prisons and schools, were among the buildings attacked at the beginning of last year's uprising.

Nearly 800 people were killed, many of them shot by the security forces, in gunbattles which raged for days as the police and army fought to put down the uprising by sect members armed with home-made guns, machetes and knives.
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PostPosted: 07-10-2010 11:40    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Nigeria Boko Haram sect 'shoots two in Maiduguri'
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-11493657

Nigeria police officers in Maiduguri (July 2009) The violence began when Boko Haram supporters attacked a police station last year

Two people have been shot dead in the northern Nigerian city of Maiduguri in the latest attacks blamed on the Boko Haram sect.

A senior opposition politician and a policeman were both killed by gunmen on motorcycles, police say.

Fifteen people, including 10 police officers, have now been killed in recent weeks.

Clashes between Boko Haram and the police in July 2009 left hundreds dead.
Continue reading the main story
Related stories

* Nigeria's 'Taliban' enigma
* Is al-Qaeda working in Nigeria?
* Sect leader 'alive when captured'

The army has been deployed to the city and motorbikes banned at night in a bid to stop the attacks.

But last month, hundreds of people suspected of being Boko Haram members escaped after gunmen attacked the prison where they were being held in the city.

The BBC's Bilkisu Babangida in Maiduguri says no-one has been arrested for the ride-by shootings since they began in August.

She says Alhaji Awana Ngala was a senior figure in the opposition All Nigeria People's Party and was also related by marriage to the governor of Borno state.

The policeman was shot outside the house of the speaker of the state's legislature. A number of other people were wounded in the attack.

She says the city's residents are afraid of more shootings, even though Boko Haram have made it clear they are targeting the police and politicians.

The violence started last year when Boko Haram members attacked a police station in Maiduguri before clashes spread to neighbouring areas.

Most of those who died were supporters of the sect, which is also known locally as the Taliban and wants to see Islamic law imposed across Nigeria.

It is opposed to Western education and accuses Nigeria's government of being corrupted by Western ideas.

The sect's leader, Mohammed Yusuf, was among those killed, apparently after he was handed over alive to the police.
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 15-03-2011 16:52    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Maiduguri: Nigeria's city of fear
By Andrew Walker
Maiduguri

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-12713739

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No-one in the Nigerian city of Maiduguri knows who to be afraid of most, a group of Islamist militants known as Boko Haram or the police.

The sect, thought to have been eliminated after a brutal uprising in 2009 in which hundreds of people were killed, is back and its members want revenge.

For the past five months they have been fighting a guerrilla war, killing policemen and people they believe helped the security services in the fight against them.

Residents of the city in the far north-east of Nigeria are trapped in the middle and anyone speaking about the sect does so nervously.


On the surface, life seems normal but no-one will speak about the Boko Haram drive-by shootings
But they say it is the fear of the police which has made it so easy for the group to grow again.

The bustling markets and children playing in the streets belie the anxiety in the city which witnessed bloody battles in July 2009.

At night, although the military and police man checkpoints, life seems almost normal.

However, few people on the streets of Maiduguri would give their names when interviewed about the latest drive-by shootings.

"You never know who they are, they could be among you," said one man, who works near the railway station where 20 months ago the police laid out bodies of dead sect members.

'The Crack'
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The police officers guarding me were discussing which one was going to be the one who pulled the trigger”

Ahmad Salkida
Journalist
Nigeria's killer cops
In the line of fire
Officials sealed their lips at the sight of a microphone, afraid to speak out and end up on a list for assassination by Boko Haram.

Traditional leaders who have given information about suspected militants to police have also been executed by gunmen.

The group's trademark attack is to ride up to their target on a motorbike - Maiduguri is full of motorbike taxis - and the pillion passenger opens fire with an automatic weapon, before speeding off.

Afterwards, police are reported to round up innocent people in areas where these hit-and-run executions occur, long after the attackers have sped away.

At the Special Armed Robbery Squad station in Maiduguri - known as "the Crack"- police are holding the wife of a suspected militant who escaped police arrest.

Although they do not accuse her of involvement in the attacks - they are preparing charges of "associating with criminals".

Yakaka, 20, and her two children, both under four, are being held almost as hostages.

"I have told the police the location of my family, but I don't think they have been told I am here. This is the situation I am in. See me here, my children are scared," she said.


Yakaka, the wife of a suspected suspected militant, is effectively being held hostage by the police
Many people in Maiduguri fear that if they bring information to the police they will suffer the same fate, or worse.

Local residents dubbed the sect Boko Haram, which literally means "Western education is forbidden" in the Hausa language, before the uprising.

Sect members had set up a community living by strict Sharia principles around its mosque in Maiduguri. Amid the 2009 trouble, the name was then popularised by the Nigerian media.

However, the group calls itself Jama'atu Ahlis Sunna Lidda'awati Wal-Jihad, which in Arabic means "People Committed to the Propagation of the Prophet's Teachings and Jihad".

Extra-judicial killing
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If you are innocent, we will release you”

Abubakar Mohammed
City police chief
Corpses and denials
On patrol with police
Their charismatic leader Mohammed Yusuf preached that Muslims should withdraw from corrupt, Western society, which included secular education and democracy, and base their lives on the teachings of the Prophet Muhammad.

Yusuf was killed by police after the sect was crushed. Police said he had tried to escape, but many believe he was executed - and the sect is now taking revenge.

The trouble in July 2009 began when officials fearing Yusuf's increasingly radical sermons calling for a jihad against the government sent the security forces to attack the sect's mosque.

Sect members returned fire and for four days had the run of the town in a killing spree.

When their ammunition ran out, the police moved in, killed more people and arrested many others - among them Nigerian journalist Ahmad Salkida.

He had followed the sect's growth since 2002 and was in personal contact with Yusuf before the violence began, so he was accused of being a sect member.

Continue reading the main story

In pictures: Aftermath of July 2009 uprising
He believes he was about to be executed when his life was saved by a senior policeman he knew.

"The police officers guarding me were discussing which one was going to be the one who pulled the trigger," he told the BBC.

During his time in detention he saw as many as 50 young men being taken out of the cell they shared, never to return.

"That extra-judicial killing by the police really created a barrier between security agents and the general population," he said.

"For the average person, you don't like the sect, you don't like their activities, but you are afraid of the police and you don't trust them. It leads to confusion."

'Armoury'
Abubakar Mohammed, newly arrived in Maiduguri and now the city's police chief, admits mistrust of his force has made the police's job difficult.

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Once you help the police, you are as good as being a policeman, so we will slaughter you”

Abu Dujana
Boko Haram
"The natives have refused to come forward and co-operate with us, so we are left with no option but to go all out and investigate our targets."

This involves arresting people for questioning.

"If you are innocent, we will release you," he says.

The police commissioner estimates the underground sect members now number about 400.

Last month a random car stop gave the police what he called a "breakthrough" in their investigations.

A cache of weapons was found that included over 800 rocket-propelled grenade shells.

A senior sect member contacted by the BBC by phone said the police's seizure was just part of their "armoury".


Prominent cleric Sheik Bashir Mustapha was shot outside his home in October
Using a nom-de-guerre of a warrior companion of the Prophet Muhammad, Abu Dujana said the sect would slay anyone they considered to be an enemy.

Questioned about the sect's ideology, he said members draw their ideas from the same pool of radical thought as al-Qaeda and Somali group al-Shabab.

"We do not want to hurt civilians, but we do not rule out using suicide bombs in the future."

His anger about the police was palpable.

"Once you help the police, you are as good as being a policeman, so we will slaughter you," he said.

In a warning Maiduguri's residents have taken to heart, Abu Dujana says the sect's fight against the government has only just begun.
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PostPosted: 17-03-2011 12:05    Post subject: Reply with quote

ramonmercado wrote:
Boko Haram


Things have really gone down hill since he did 'Whiter Shade of Pale' haven't they?
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PostPosted: 17-03-2011 15:35    Post subject: Reply with quote

Heckler20 wrote:
ramonmercado wrote:
Boko Haram


Things have really gone down hill since he did 'Whiter Shade of Pale' haven't they?


Thats what getting into Death Metal does to you.
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