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rynner2Online
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PostPosted: 11-11-2013 19:46    Post subject: Reply with quote

Danny Boy at 100: The classic song 'written by angels'
By Peter Crutchley, BBC Knowledge & Learning

It is 100 years since the release of Danny Boy. The haunting ballad has been recorded by a who's who of iconic musicians including Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash and Bing Crosby.

What is it about the song that has resonated with so many people for so long?
The popularity of Danny Boy has stretched across the world from Britain to Ireland to America. With its sorrowful lyrics, it has become a common refrain at funerals.
It was played at services for victims of the 9/11 attacks in New York and at Elvis Presley's memorial. Elvis believed the song was "written by the angels".
Johnny Cash, who often sang about sin and redemption, explored a darker interpretation of the song in 1965.

The melody of Danny Boy - called the Londonderry Air - was also played at the funerals of President John F Kennedy and Princess Diana.

"Although the words were written by an Englishman, the fact that they were written to the Londonderry Air is possibly a source of pride to people who see themselves as having an Irish identity," says BBC Radio Ulster presenter Brian Mullen.
"It has retained its popularity, possibly because it has been recorded by nearly everybody so has reached a large market."

The origins of Danny Boy have long been the subject of debate.
The melody itself is believed to have been penned by Irish harpist Rory Dall O'Cahan in the late 16th or early 17th Century.
Folk legend says that Rory, having collapsed drunk one night by the riverside, heard fairies performing a melody on his harp. He then performed the tune as O'Cahan's Lament.

In 1851, in Limavady, County Londonderry, music collector Jane Ross was moved by a beautiful tune she heard from a violinist across the street. It was O'Cahan's Lament.
Jane transcribed the melody which was published in 1855 under the title Londonderry Air.

Several lyricists attempted to put words to the tune, but it wasn't until the 20th Century that it merged with the words we know today.
Fred Weatherly, an English barrister who moonlighted as a songwriter, had written lyrics for a song named Danny Boy in 1910.
His Irish-American sister-in-law Margaret Weatherly sang him the melody of the Londonderry Air.
Fred adapted his lyrics to the tune to create Danny Boy, which was published in 1913. No credit was given to Margaret - who died penniless in 1939.

Danny Boy was released just prior to World War One. With its images of loss and parting, and hints at reunion, the song became an anthem for the troops.

Although the lyrics were written by an Englishman, who allegedly never set foot in the country, the familiarity and local origin of the melody all but ensured Danny Boy's popularity in Ireland.
Such success was further secured when many of those Irishmen who fought in the war returned with the refrain in tow.

Singers like John McCormack were performing it in music halls around the world and recorded versions became increasingly available as the gramophone gained popularity.

When Danny Boy crossed the Atlantic its popularity soared. Huge numbers of Irish migrated to America in the 1920s, and they took Danny Boy with them.

Its sense of longing for home and memories of the land and people left behind mean the song has strongly resonated with Irish emigrants throughout the century.
"Its long-time popularity, especially among the Irish diaspora in America and Britain, has made it a bonding agent for exiles," adds Brian Mullen.
"It is a way for them to recognise themselves, and others to recognise them, as a group."

Why does Danny Boy evoke such an emotional response in people?
"There is something about the way that music works on our emotions that is more visceral and powerful than words" says musician Joe Jackson.

Each phrase of Danny Boy has an arc structure, that rises and falls, which Jackson feels enhances the song's poignancy.
"It's almost like the sun coming out and the clouds passing over it again, which is very Irish," he adds.

Musicologist Katie Overy explains how listening to music is a holistic experience.
"Music activates more parts of the brain at the same time than any other activity we know about to date," she says.
"Danny Boy has several features that combine to make it an emotional experience for many listeners, from its dramatic structure, large pitch range and familiar tonality to its historical, geographical and cultural associations."

...

100 years on

Danny Boy's popularity has not diminished. The 100th anniversary of the song was marked by a mass sing-along in Derry-Londonderry, the UK City of Culture in 2013.
With its evocative melody and open meaning, it continues to resonate with new generations.

Irish-American writer Malachy McCourt, author of 'Danny Boy: The Legend of the Beloved Irish Ballad', sums up why he feels the song's appeal will endure:
"All the flowers are dying, and they will be for a long time, but then they'll bloom again and Danny will still be on the road. You never know, because somewhere the pipes, the pipes will be calling."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/0/24810371

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gncxxOffline
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PostPosted: 12-11-2013 18:10    Post subject: Reply with quote

The film Miller's Crossing has a fantastic use of Danny Boy in one scene.
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rynner2Online
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PostPosted: 27-11-2013 11:53    Post subject: Reply with quote

HMS Warspite centenary marked at Devonport Dockyard

One of Britain's "deadliest ships" has been honoured at a centenary service in the city where she was built.
More than 200 guests attended the celebration of HMS Warspite at Plymouth's Devonport Dockyard.
The ship, launched in 1913, holds more honours than any other in British naval history and served in both World Wars.
Alan Jones from HMS Warspite Association said she was "a mighty warship of historical significance" to both Plymouth and the nation.

The "iconic" super dreadnought was launched on 26 November 1913 in the presence of the First Lord of the Admiralty, Winston Churchill, and 30,000 others.

During the Battle of Jutland in 1916, Warspite held off the German High Seas Fleet, surviving two dozen heavy shell hits, while in World War Two, she saw action in the Arctic, the Mediterranean, the Indian Ocean and the English Channel.
She was taken apart after running aground in a storm off Prussia Cove in Cornwall in 1947.

The ship was the seventh Royal Navy vessel to bear the name Warspite.
The original was launched in 1596 and became Sir Walter Raleigh's flagship for an attack on the Spanish port of Cadiz.

Iain Ballantyne, associate member of the HMS Warspite Association and Plymouth naval historian and author, said the 1913 ship's "amazing" life was also the story of a navy and a nation.
"She was created and launched when Britain was at the zenith of its imperial power and last saw action when the empire was in decline," he said.
"Warspite used oil-fired boilers for her propulsion at a time when most naval vessels relied on coal, plus she carried the biggest guns ever mounted in a vessel of her kind."

Mr Ballantyne, who has documented the ship's history in his book, Warspite: From Jutland Hero to Cold War Warrior, said despite fears while she was being built, "Warspite turned out to be a tremendous success [and] a remarkable vessel".

"Churchill famously had nightmares that, with time running out in the race with Germany, Warspite would turn out to be slow and her untested guns might not work at all.
"[However] she and four sister vessels - Queen Elizabeth, Valiant, Barham and Malaya - were the deadliest battleships fielded by any side in World War One and greatly feared by German Navy."

Mr Jones, a chief stoker on board the eighth Warspite - a nuclear-powered submarine - said the service was "a celebration of the Navy today and in the past, the ship-building skills of Plymouth and the ship, her four sister ships, and the Cold War submarine that bore the same name".
"This is a mark of our appreciation of the ship builders' skills and the sailors who served in battleship HMS Warspite during three decades of distinguished service in war and peace.''

Guests at the service included former Plymouth Devonport MP Lord David Owen, the mayors of Plymouth, Torpoint and Saltash, veteran sailors and former admirals.

The Devonport Naval Base commander Commodore Graeme Little said the ship was "the iconic battleship of the last century and extremely important as a reference point to the Royal Navy, the city of Plymouth and Devonport".

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-25104303

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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 27-11-2013 12:12    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Cornwall wreckers got her in the end.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 27-11-2013 13:20    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you like photos of planes, get a load of this! The one I like shows four Red Arrows, all flying in different directions, but, from the photographer's viewpoint all overlapping in the picture! Amazing!

10th anniversary of Airteam, world's biggest aviation image library

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/aviation/10475796/10th-anniversary-of-Airteam-worlds-biggest-aviation-image-library.html#?frame=2746457
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PostPosted: 01-01-2014 09:15    Post subject: Reply with quote

Today would be the 50th anniversary of Top Of The Pops. Unlike the recent Doctor Who golden jubilee, the occasion is being ignored by the BBC because of the Jimmy Savile scandal, says the Daily Star:

BBC snubs Top Of The Pops 50th anniversary over Savile sex scandal

Quote:
Originally commissioned for six weeks, the programme proved a massive hit and ran for 42 years.

At its high point in the 1970s the show was watched by a quarter of the UK TV audience.

But its 50th anniversary is not being marked in any way by the BBC because of the programme’s links with Savile.

Since his death two years ago at the age of 84 he has been exposed as Britain’s most prolific paedophile, suspected of molesting more than 450 victims, some as young as eight.
etc
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KondoruOffline
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PostPosted: 01-01-2014 18:06    Post subject: Reply with quote

I cant comment. Im not, and have never been a pop fan.

(However, I have watched TotP...)

Also....

Quote:
Mr Jones, a chief stoker on board the eighth Warspite - a nuclear-powered submarine


What does a stoker on a nuclear sub do, pray?
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gncxxOffline
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PostPosted: 01-01-2014 18:49    Post subject: Reply with quote

escargot1 wrote:
Today would be the 50th anniversary of Top Of The Pops. Unlike the recent Doctor Who golden jubilee, the occasion is being ignored by the BBC because of the Jimmy Savile scandal, says the Daily Star:

BBC snubs Top Of The Pops 50th anniversary over Savile sex scandal


Ignored apart from the TOTP special on BBC One yesterday and the repeats of TOTP 1979 starting next week, marked with two special documentaries on BBC Four on Friday, that is.
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MythopoeikaOffline
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PostPosted: 01-01-2014 19:44    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kondoru wrote:
Quote:
Mr Jones, a chief stoker on board the eighth Warspite - a nuclear-powered submarine


What does a stoker on a nuclear sub do, pray?


He's the man who gets chucked into the reactor room to move the fuel rods. splat
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 01-01-2014 20:32    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mythopoeika wrote:
Kondoru wrote:
Quote:
Mr Jones, a chief stoker on board the eighth Warspite - a nuclear-powered submarine


What does a stoker on a nuclear sub do, pray?


He's the man who gets chucked into the reactor room to move the fuel rods. splat


Heres one of them.

Quote:
Previous employment was as Wrecker 'M' and Chief Stoker serving on Vanguard Class Submarines for six years. As section chief with up to 12 personnel working for me I would plan, administer stores, conduct maintenance, diagnose and repair defects on Ships systems including, high pressure hydraulic, air and water systems. Other systems included refrigeration and domestic services.

http://uk.linkedin.com/pub/paul-strettle/63/638/abb
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escargot1Offline
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PostPosted: 02-01-2014 01:30    Post subject: Reply with quote

gncxx wrote:
escargot1 wrote:
Today would be the 50th anniversary of Top Of The Pops. Unlike the recent Doctor Who golden jubilee, the occasion is being ignored by the BBC because of the Jimmy Savile scandal, says the Daily Star:

BBC snubs Top Of The Pops 50th anniversary over Savile sex scandal


Ignored apart from the TOTP special on BBC One yesterday and the repeats of TOTP 1979 starting next week, marked with two special documentaries on BBC Four on Friday, that is.


I did mention that the source was the Daily Star. Laughing
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 02-01-2014 07:54    Post subject: Reply with quote

escargot1 wrote:
Today would be the 50th anniversary of Top Of The Pops. Unlike the recent Doctor Who golden jubilee, the occasion is being ignored by the BBC because of the Jimmy Savile scandal, says the Daily Star:

BBC snubs Top Of The Pops 50th anniversary over Savile sex scandal

But was there a cake with 50 candles, eh?
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gncxxOffline
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PostPosted: 03-01-2014 12:32    Post subject: Reply with quote

escargot1 wrote:
gncxx wrote:
Ignored apart from the TOTP special on BBC One yesterday and the repeats of TOTP 1979 starting next week, marked with two special documentaries on BBC Four on Friday, that is.


I did mention that the source was the Daily Star. Laughing


I think the Beeb are damned if they do, dammed if they don't, I'm surprised the papers didn't go for the "How dare they continue this infernal brand?!" angle. Like most people I watched it for the music. Did anyone ever think, "Fantastic! Peter Powell's presenting this week!"?!
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PostPosted: 09-01-2014 13:56    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Gabrielle Giffords skydives on anniversary of shooting
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-25663002

Former US Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords marks the third anniversary of the Tucson shooting with a skydive

Former US Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, who was shot and badly wounded in 2011, has marked the third anniversary of the attack by skydiving.

Ms Giffords waved and blew kisses to a crowd at a skydiving site near Tucson, Arizona, after landing without injury.

Six people were killed and Ms Giffords was shot in the head when Jared Lee Loughner opened fire at an outdoor political meeting in Tucson.

He is serving seven life terms plus 140 years in jail.

Gabrielle Giffords comes in to land in her tandem jump
Ms Giffords was strapped to a professional skydiver
"Gabby landed beautifully. Happy she's safe. So proud of her bravery," Ms Giffords' husband, former astronaut Mark Kelly, wrote on his Twitter account.

She made the tandem jump strapped to a professional skydiver.

Jimmy Hatch, a former Navy Seal who accompanied Ms Giffords, said the group of skydivers taking part in the event held hands and formed a circle shortly after leaving the aircraft and then made a line with Ms Giffords in the middle.

"She was the least nervous person on the plane," he said.

The office of US Vice President Joe Biden said he called Ms Giffords on Wednesday to wish her good luck.

Ms Giffords resigned from Congress in January 2012 to focus on her recovery from serious injury.

She has become a prominent campaigner for tighter gun controls in the US.

Mor
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 19-01-2014 09:59    Post subject: Reply with quote

South East Brownies celebrate 100th birthday

Some 3,000 Brownies are in West Sussex to begin a year of celebrations to mark the 100th anniversary of the movement formed by Lord Baden-Powell.
The girls aged seven to 10, from across the South East, are spending the weekend at Butlins in Bognor Regis.
Guide leader Jennifer Sibley from 3rd Strood Guides, Kent, said it was like a giant sleepover.
"I don't think many of them slept last night - they are all so excited," she said.

The weekend is one of the first celebrations for the centenary.
The Brownie section of Girlguiding was started in 1914 at a time when women did not have the right to vote.
"Girls' lives have changed massively since then and Brownies has changed with it," said Chief Guide Gill Slocombe.

An 8ft-wide (2.4m) birthday cake with 100 candles has been built for the celebration using 55,000 Lego bricks.
"I think they are all really enjoying themselves - lots of girls are having their photographs taken with the cake," said Ms Sibley. Very Happy

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-25792196
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