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The Falklands
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rynner2Offline
What a Cad!
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PostPosted: 01-02-2013 07:56    Post subject: Reply with quote

Argentina declines invitation to Falklands meeting

Argentina's foreign minister has turned down a Foreign Office invitation to meet members of the Falkland Islands government in London next week.
Hector Timerman rejected the offer, saying: "The international community does not recognise a third party in this dispute." Rolling Eyes
The island's legislative assembly had said they anticipated a "full and frank exchange of views" in such a meeting.
The Foreign Office says it is considering its response.
A referendum on the islands' political status is to be held in March.

Mr Timerman, insisted that the United Nations regarded the dispute over the Falklands as a bilateral issue between London and Buenos Aires.
Earlier this month, Argentina's president, Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner urged the prime minister to abide by a 1965 UN resolution to "negotiate a solution" to the dispute.
Argentina claims the islands - which it calls the Malvinas - were forcibly stripped from Argentina in "a blatant exercise of 19th Century colonialism".

Last year, marked 30 years since the Falklands War - when the islands were occupied by Argentine forces for 74 days.

A statement issued by the Falkland Islands Legislative Assembly after the Foreign Office issued the invitation, but before it was turned down by Mr Timerman, said its representatives Dick Sawle and Jan Cheek, would not be "negotiating any deal".
"We look forward to giving Mr Timerman some very direct messages on the unacceptability of Argentina's actions against the Falkland Islands in recent years," it said.
"We demand that our rights be respected, and that we be left in peace to choose our own future and to develop our country for our children and generations to come.
"It is only right that he should hear this directly from us, as well as from Mr Hague."

A Foreign Office spokesman said: "The FCO accepted a request, conveyed by the Argentine Embassy in December, for the foreign secretary to meet Argentine foreign minister, Mr Hector Timerman, during his visit to the UK on 4-6 February.

"In accepting such a request for a meeting at foreign minister level, we informed the Argentine Embassy that the foreign secretary wished to raise issues and concerns about the Falkland Islands with Mr Timerman personally and that he had invited political representatives of the Falkland Islands government to attend the meeting."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-21288084
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 01-02-2013 09:09    Post subject: Reply with quote

Last night I watched

Locomotion: Dan Snow's History of Railways - Episode 3

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01qh3z3/Locomotion_Dan_Snows_History_of_Railways_Episode_3/

Available until
12:19AM Tue, 12 Feb 2013

It has an interesting section on Britain's development of the railways and trade in Argentina. Dan Snow even described Argentina as something like "an unofficial part of the British Empire!"

An interesting angle! (Watch from about 23 minutes in.)
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AnalisOffline
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PostPosted: 01-02-2013 10:15    Post subject: Reply with quote

theyithian wrote:
rynner2 wrote:

Argentine journalist Celina Andreassi agreed and says the Sun's advert was quite provocative.


...and, at the same time, quite awesome.


For that, it should not have rehearsed the old counter-truth that British sovereignty dated back to 1765.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 05-02-2013 14:03    Post subject: Reply with quote

Falklands 'will be under our control in 20 years', says Argentine foreign minister
Argentina's foreign minister has declared he will confront the UK government with a "diplomatic package" that will see the Falkland Islands handed over by Britain in less than 20 years.
By Damien McElroy
1:21PM GMT 05 Feb 2013

Hector Timerman opened a visit to London in which he will press the message that the Islands are a colonial hangover by claiming that Britain would be forced to relinquish its grip on the overseas territory.
He said Argentina was an "incomplete country" as a result of the British claims on what his government calls the Malvinas in the South Atlantic.

"I don't think it will take another 20 years. I think that the world is going through a process of understanding more and more that this is a colonial issue, an issue of colonialism," he said. "We don't support the occupation of foreign lands, and the Malvinas case is the occupation of a foreign land."

While Mr Timerman also vowed to respect the "rights" of the 3,000 residents of the islands, he dismissed the need for their consent to a transfer of sovereignty.
"I don't have to persuade them. The United Nations says there is a conflict between the United Kingdom and Argentina. I don't have to persuade anybody. We have to apply international law and accept the resolutions; if not the UN becomes a body that is only useful when it backs the powerful," he said.

The Islands' government has angered the Argentine government by pledging to hold a referendum next month to affirm the allegiance to Britain.
But Mr Timerman dismissed the vote as irrelevant. "There is a difference between interests and wishes. The people living in the Malvinas will have their interests taken into consideration, but not their wishes. That is what the United Nations has said, many times," he said.

Mr Timerman pulled out of a planned meeting to discuss the disputed Falkland Islands with Foreign Secretary William Hague after the Foreign Office invited representatives of the islands' government.

Argentina claims sovereignty over the archipelago and its forces invaded the territory in 1982 before UK troops retook it after a war that claimed the lives of 255 British military personnel, three islanders and 649 Argentinians.

Argentine president Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner has in recent years strongly asserted her country's demands for the Falklands to come under its sovereignty despite the opposition of the islanders.

Mr Timerman rejected allegations that his government was using the issue as a distraction from the country's economic implosion. He said: "We have been trying to find a peaceful solution for 180 years. I think the fanatics are not in Buenos Aires, [but] maybe in the United Kingdom because they are 14,000 kilometres away from the islands.
"I think they are using the people living in the islands for political [purposes] and to have access to oil and natural resources which belong to the Argentine people."

A Foreign Office spokesman rejected Mr Timerman's criticisms as unfounded. She said: "The people of the Falklands are British and have chosen to be so. They remain free to choose their own futures, both politically and economically, and have a right to self-determination as enshrined in the UN Charter. This is a fundamental human right for all peoples.
"As such, there can be no negotiations on the sovereignty of the Falkland Islands unless and until such time as the Islanders so wish.
"The UK has administered the Falklands peacefully and effectively for nearly 180 years.
"We want to have a full and friendly relationship with Argentina, as neighbours in the South Atlantic and as responsible fellow members of the G20, but we will not negotiate away the human and political rights of the Falkland Islands' people against their will or behind their backs."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/southamerica/falklandislands/9849971/Falklands-will-be-under-our-control-in-20-years-says-Argentine-foreign-minister.html

This isn't really news any more, it's just the same old rhetoric repeated ad nauseam.

Argentina is a one-time colony of Spain - it rejected that status to become independent. And yet it cannot accept that the Falklanders have rejected their brief time as a colony of Argentina (in 1982) and wish to determine their own future.
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YithianOffline
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PostPosted: 05-02-2013 14:25    Post subject: Reply with quote

Delusional.
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 05-02-2013 14:27    Post subject: Reply with quote

Whats this about Chris Patten becoming Governor?
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 10-02-2013 10:29    Post subject: Reply with quote

William Hague: we'll stand up to Argentine bullies over Falklands
William Hague has accused Argentina of "bullying and threatening" behaviour and vowed never to give away control of the islands.
By Robert Watts, Deputy Political Editor
12:00AM GMT 10 Feb 2013

The Foreign Secretary dismissed the Buenos Aires Government's claim on the South Atlantic islands as a "fantasy".
"Britain is a country which supports the right of people to determine their own future," Mr Hague told The Sun newspaper.
"There should never be reward for bullying or threatening behaviour in international affairs - just as there never should be in our personal lives."

The Foreign Secretary said the bullish claims to the Falklands by Christina Fernandez de Kirchener, the Argentine president, only made the islanders more determined to remain British.
Next month the Falklands will hold a referendum to decide whether the islands will stay in British hands.

Relations between Argentina and the United Kingdom are now considered more fractious than at any point since the war over islands in 1982.
Hector Timerman, the Argentine foreign minister, recently snubbed talks with Mr Hague because Falklanders were also invited. Mr Timerman even tried to draw comparisons between the dispute and the situation in the West Bank.
Mr Hague added: "To compare the islands to settlers in the West Bank, which is an occupied land, is absolutely ridiculous.
"I absolutely reject that comparison. There are families in the Falklands who are in their ninth generation.

"The Falklands have been there longer than Argentina has had its current boundaries or existed in its current form."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/9860387/William-Hague-well-stand-up-to-Argentine-bullies-over-Falklands.html
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PeripartOffline
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PostPosted: 10-02-2013 10:56    Post subject: Reply with quote

How about we sell them West Falkland - where almost no-one lives - and agree that East Falkland remains British? The very definition of a diplomatic compromise, and Argentina can build their very own Puerto Stanley in the West!
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 24-02-2013 12:25    Post subject: Reply with quote

Argentina dispatch: the troubled reign of Queen Cristina of Argentina
Beset by economic stagnation, Argentines are growing weary of President Cristina Kirchner's obsession with the Falklands, reports Philip Sherwell
By Philip Sherwell, Buenos Aires
8:00AM GMT 24 Feb 2013

For a president accustomed to adulation at carefully-orchestrated rallies in the land of Eva Peron, the demonstration broadcast on national television will not have been welcome.

When Cristina Kirchner’s name was mentioned at Friday’s first anniversary ceremonies for families of a fatal Buenos Aires train crash, there were whistles and boos.
Then, from the crowd gathered on the platforms of the capital’s rundown Station 11, where 51 people died in an accident blamed on railway underfunding, came the angry chants of ”daughter of a whore”.

Just 15 months ago, the Argentine leader was basking in the afterglow of a landslide victory, but her popularity has flagged dramatically as the economy has floundered.
And so ahead of mid-term elections that will shape her political future, she has once again turned to her favourite distraction from domestic difficulties — Argentina’s claim to the Falklands.

The islands’ 1,619 registered voters will next month be asked whether they wish to remain a British overseas territory, in a referendum which Downing Street and the Falklands’ inhabitants hope will counter Mrs Kirchner’s demands for negotiations with London on sovereignty.
No-one doubts that the verdict will be a resounding “yes” from the residents of the wind-swept archipelago that sits 300 miles off Argentina but has been part of the British crown since 1833.

There is just as overwhelming agreement in Argentina that Las Malvinas, as the islands are called in Spanish, are occupied territory. That conviction is hardly surprising, given that claim of sovereignty is drilled into the country’s schoolchildren from the age of five, via patriotic songs in classrooms decorated with maps that depict the Falklands in the Argentine flag of blue and white.

Earlier this month, Mrs Kirchner dispatched Hector Timerman, her foreign minister, to London on a quixotic propaganda mission to promote the cause and wrote an open letter to David Cameron, the prime minister, denouncing British “colonialism”.
Her aides curtly dismiss the referendum as a “media stunt”. The islanders “are implanted settlers who do not have the right to define the territory’s status”, noted Daniel Filmus, a senior Kirchner ally who accompanied Mr Timerman to Britain.

This time, though, her attempts to play the nationalist card to shore up domestic support are falling notably flat, as Argentines struggle with a stagnant economy and one of the world’s highest inflation rates.

“The Malvinas are certainly close to the heart of all Argentines, but the government’s attempt to use the islands as a distraction from its domestic problems, particularly the deteriorating economic situation, is failing,” Martin Redrado, the former Central Bank governor, told The Sunday Telegraph in his modern office block in downtown Buenos Aires.
“The Malvinas issue is not going to cover up rising unemployment, lack of investment, high inflation and lacklustre growth.”

If anyone knows about Mrs Kirchner’s handling of the economy, it is Mr Redrado. For he quit his old position after a dispute with the president — a showdown that at one stage saw him locked out of his office by police - over her plans to tap the bank’s reserves to pay down the country’s foreign debt.

Indeed, for all Mrs Kirchner’s efforts to stoke nationalist fervour about the islands, what was so striking last week was how remote the cause seemed on the leafy streets of Buenos Aires in the dog days of the southern hemisphere summer.
In the coffee shops and steakhouses of a city that feels as much like Paris, Madrid and Rome as South America, middle-class locals expressed their exasperation over the government’s stranglehold on the economy and shared tips about where to obtain US dollars for foreign trips in the in the so-called “caves” (dens) for illegal currency exchanges.

“It’s an article of faith for Argentines that the Malvinas are our territory, but nobody is interested in this obsessive and inflammatory approach from Kirchner,” said Daniel Menendez, 41, a management consultant, as he shared a bottle of the country’s Malbec wine with friends in a Buenos Aires restaurant.
“We know that the reality is that the islanders consider themselves British, they are going to vote to remain British and nothing that is going to alter that.
“She is just whipping this up because the economy is a disaster and it’s an election year. The real problem in this country is not who runs the Malvinas, but how each day, she is making us more like Venezuela under Hugo Chavez.”

For working-class Argentines trying to stretch the weekly pay cheque as inflation hits 30 percent, the fate of the islands was also far from their minds.
“Of course, we all support the recovery of the Malvinas, but honestly right now I wish the government would deal with the economy and get prices down rather than all this talk about something we can’t change,” said Isabel Benitez, 47, who was walking to her job as a hotel cleaner past the Recoleta cemetery, where Evita — as Eva Peron is universally known - is buried in a marble family tomb. “I’d rather Cristina focussed on running the 23 provinces we already have.”

etc...

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/southamerica/argentina/9890078/Argentina-dispatch-the-troubled-reign-of-Queen-Cristina-of-Argentina.html
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YithianOffline
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PostPosted: 08-03-2013 13:52    Post subject: Reply with quote

Message to President Obama:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=6tfvfsZaMsY#!
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Pietro_Mercurios
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PostPosted: 08-03-2013 14:11    Post subject: Reply with quote

theyithian wrote:
Message to President Obama:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=6tfvfsZaMsY#!

From the people that front for Big Oil and Big Tobacco. More anti-Obama propaganda from the Heritage Foundation.

The US government, under Reagan, a POTUS that the Heritage Foundation was virtually set up to serve, was less than enthusiastic over the British case for the Falklands.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/29/world/europe/falklands-war-caused-rare-friction-for-thatcher-and-reagan.html?_r=0

http://uk.reuters.com/article/2012/12/28/uk-britain-usa-falklands-idUKBRE8BR00820121228

http://www.channel4.com/news/thatcher-reagan-falklands-plea

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/margaret-thatcher-blasted-ronald-reagan-1508068

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2012/12/27/margaret-thatcher-defied-regan_n_2369370.html

plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose
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YithianOffline
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PostPosted: 08-03-2013 14:30    Post subject: Reply with quote

The song not the singer.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 09-03-2013 08:32    Post subject: Reply with quote

Long article...

The fate of the Falklands is in the islanders' hands
With the world watching, the people of the tiny British Overseas Territory go to the polls to make history
[video]
By Neil Tweedie
8:01PM GMT 08 Mar 2013

....

The Falklands oscillate between complete backwater and centre of international attention. The parish-pump politics of this craggy imperial remnant can transmute overnight into the subject of fraught debate at the United Nations. So it has been with the two-day referendum that will take place on Sunday and Monday, during which some 1,700 eligible voters will be asked to answer yes or no to the question: “Do you wish the Falklands Islands to retain their current political status as an Overseas Territory of the United Kingdom?”

The result is a foregone conclusion, but there will be plenty of people in Argentina and elsewhere looking for the slightest crack in the islanders’ loyalty to the mother country. Lots of journalists are paying attention, too. In addition to the British media contingent, some 50 are expected to fly in from Chile on Saturday, including television crews from Japan, Russia and Latin America. With them will be a contingent of electoral observers from Mexico, Chile, Paraguay and Uruguay who have agreed to join a Canadian-organised monitoring process.

Juan Manuel Henao, the American deputy head of the Referendum International Observation Mission, says: “It is a conscious decision to secure observers from the (Latin American) countries. The Falkland Islands are a Latin American issue and it is important for these observers to vouch for the process and draw their conclusion about what has gone on here.”

The Falkland Islands Government sees the observers as essential in ensuring the legitimacy of a process that began with a conversation between two members of the islands’ elected assembly during a cigarette break, and which has now become an international issue, affecting relations between Britain and America, and arousing the wrath of Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, Argentina’s combustible president.

“A colleague, Gavin Shaw, and I were having a chat,” explains Dick Sawle, one of the assembly members behind the referendum. “It was a couple of years ago and we raised it with colleagues, and I suppose we weren’t that convinced. Then, when the Argentine pressure on the Falklands increased under Kirchner, we revisited the idea. And the more we thought about it, the more we thought it was a good idea.”

But why vote on a question that few, if any, islanders are going to answer in the negative?
“It gets us out of the old bipartite 'possession’ debate between Argentina and Britain,” says John Fowler, a journalist on the islands’ newspaper, Penguin News. “Who owns the Falklands? Well, we, the Falkland Islanders, own the Falklands, actually. We have a historical and mutually loyal relationship with Britain, but we are not part of the United Kingdom.”

Those behind the vote, costing £75,000, believe it will undercut Argentina’s stated position, that the islands’ inhabitants enjoy no separate political identity. As a “non-indigenous” people, so the line from Buenos Aires goes, the islanders, known as Kelpers, have no right to decide their fate. This conveniently ignores the fact that many of those voting can trace their presence in this part of the world back to the 1830s and 1840s, when the ancestors of a good part of Argentina’s population were sitting at home in Spain, Italy, Syria and elsewhere. Twisted Evil

David Cameron has backed the referendum enthusiastically, but he has failed to gain support for the exercise from the United States. John Kerry, the US Secretary of State, sat firmly on the fence during his inaugural visit to London, restating Washington’s policy that, while it recognises de facto British control of the islands, it takes no position on sovereignty. The referendum is an embarrassment for the Americans, who are happy to sound the trumpet of self-determination when it suits them, but prefer not to let it impede relations with South America’s second-most important country.

The vote is pushed strongly in the Falklands for fear of a poor turnout that could send the wrong signal to the world. One poster has Mr Sawle pointing his finger, Kitchener-like (not to be confused with Kirchner-like) towards passers-by, while announcing “Your Country Wants You To Vote Yes”. The Yes-vote campaign is in full swing, despite the marked absence of a No counterpart.

“Grass roots” events are planned for the next few days, including the spelling out of a giant “Yes” by four-wheel drives on the Camber, a stretch of land opposite Stanley on the far side of the harbour. Historically, the site has been used by the Royal Navy and other ships’ crews to commemorate their vessels with names spelt out in giant lettering. A briefing in Penguin News tells islanders to put on a good show for the media.
“When you pass journalists, open your window, smile, wave or give the thumbs-up,” it implores. “Face-painting, especially with children, is encouraged. Please bring your flags.”

Since the war in 1982, one that saw a British force eject 11,000 Argentinian invaders, the islanders have become good at PR. They have also become wealthy on the back of licences issued to foreign companies wanting to exploit the rich fisheries around the islands. The quasi-feudal system that existed prior to 1982, in which a few absentee landowners controlled the economy, has given way to a vibrant, modern economy. And now there is oil, possibly on the scale of the North Sea. Investment is pouring in, despite Kirchner’s megaphone diplomacy, warning of sanctions against those who do business with the islands.

Independence is now being talked about openly, but as a distant goal dependent on the removal of the Argentinian threat. Until then, the British and the military protection they provide are needed. Says Mr Fowler: “Maybe we have been goaded into a referendum a little bit by people who justifiably say, 'Look, in the present situation, you have the best of both worlds. You are supported by Britain militarily, but you are not paying British taxes and you are actually better off than Britain. Come on, grow up a bit.’?”

Some islanders are wary about rocking the boat with a vote, despite support from Downing Street. “There are people here, particularly from the older generation, who feel even talking about independence shows disloyalty to Britain,” says Mr Fowler.

But the signs of a more distant relationship are there to see. When arriving at Mount Pleasant Airport, the base built at enormous cost to defend the islands, British visitors must submit landing cards and customs forms. Those voting in the referendum must have been accepted for permanent residency after spending seven years here. There are two flags, too, the Union flag and the Falkland Islands Ensign, which flies outside government buildings.

On Sunday morning, one of the Islander aircraft of the Falkland Islands Government Air Service will take a ballot box to the remote communities around West Falkland, while mobile voting stations fan out across East Falkland. The thing about this event, though, is that it will settle precisely nothing. Self-determination is an implicit right of British Overseas Territory status, so a Yes or No vote to Britannia’s rule will still leave open the possibility of an independent Falklands. Argentina, meanwhile, is unlikely ever to drop its claim to an archipelago that occupies a strange but central place in its national myth.

The interest on Monday night will be in that rare species, a No-voter. “There will always be a few people to vote no, for all sorts of reasons, really,” says Mr Sawle. “I suppose there is a small number of people who think by voting No, they are voting for independence.”

Mr Fowler is more concerned by apathy than a significant No vote. “What worries me is if people don’t come out to vote,” he says. “There is a bit of resistance here to the notion that people are being pressured to vote.”

Leif Pollard, a fifth-generation islander, sees the referendum as an essentially simple exercise. “It will educate the rest of the world as to the way we feel,” she says, “that we want to remain a British Overseas Territory and not a colony of Argentina.”

Mr Fowler hopes for something more, the beginnings of nationhood. “We are one hundred per cent certain about one thing, and that is that we do not want to be Argentine. But you don’t want to define yourself by a negative. This referendum has done two good things: it has politicised a generation which was not politicised, and allowed us to begin the debate about who we want to be.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/southamerica/falklandislands/9917947/The-fate-of-the-Falklands-is-in-the-islanders-hands.html
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 09-03-2013 12:55    Post subject: Reply with quote

Extend the franchise to the sheep.
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YithianOffline
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PostPosted: 09-03-2013 13:31    Post subject: Reply with quote

Should still be ok, just about. Most sheep on the Falklands are Polwarths, which originate in Austraila. Australians have repeatedly opted against independence, hopefully their four-legged friends would display similarly loyalist tendancies.
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