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Bronze Age Discoveries.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 20-04-2012 07:39    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another 'not new' discovery:

Cornish Bronze Age boat project
20 April 2012 Last updated at 01:31

Archaeologists in Cornwall believe they have evidence that shows Bronze Age traders were maritime travellers and used hollowed-out wooden boats to cross the English Channel and buy and sell metals.

The Nebra Sky Disc - thought to be one of the oldest Bronze Age representations of the cosmos - was found in a field in Germany, but gold symbols on the bronze disc have been identified as coming from the Carnon Down mines in Cornwall.

The type of boats used by the Bronze Age traders are being recreated for a project at the National Maritime Museum in Falmouth. [video]

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-17775009

Carnon Downs is only a few miles from me. But given the age of the disc, the gold could well be alluvial gold rather than mined gold, as Wiki suggests below. There are various mentions of the Nebra disc on FTMB, and Wiki has a page on it too:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nebra_skydisk
Quote:
According to an initial analysis of trace elements by x-ray fluorescence by E. Pernicka, then at the University of Freiberg, the copper originated at Bischofshofen in Austria, while the gold was thought to be from the Carpathian Mountains.[2] However a more recent analysis found that the gold was from the river Carnon in Cornwall.[3] The tin content of the bronze was also from Cornwall.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 21-04-2012 09:47    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner2 wrote:

Penlee Museum shows Bronze Age necklace Penwith lunula

A Bronze Age necklace found in Cornwall in the 18th Century has returned to the county after being housed at the British Museum for more than 150 years.
The necklace, known as Penwith lunula, has been loaned to the Penlee House Gallery and Museum in Penzance.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-17745523

I went to see this yesterday. I almost missed it - it was smaller than I'd expected, and there was no big notice "Our Latest Acquisition!"

I managed a quick snap of it, as I hadn't seen any "No Photography" signs:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v212/rynner/Penwith_Lunula.jpg

(I didn't use flash, so it's not detailed enough to read the info cards.)
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PostPosted: 21-04-2012 10:05    Post subject: Reply with quote

It almost looks like a piece of modern jewellery...it has that simplicity about it.
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PostPosted: 21-04-2012 13:38    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Wrexham butcher discovers Bronze Age axe in Flintshire
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-north-east-wales-17767303

The National Museum Wales hopes to acquire the treasure after valuation

Bronze Age treasure, including a 3,000-year-old axe, has been discovered by a metal-detecting butcher in Flintshire.

The hoard, found in the Treuddyn area, includes a socketed "Type Gillespie" axe and a hook-shaped tin object.

The items, thought to have been buried between 1050 BC and 800 BC, were declared treasure by the North East Wales Coroner at Wrexham on Thursday.

The items, found in a boggy field by Colin Lewis from Wrexham, will be analysed by experts before valuation.

The National Museum Wales wants to acquire the hoard following its independent valuation.

The items were found less than 20cm (eight inches) apart while Mr Lewis was metal-detecting in a boggy field under pasture.

Radiocarbon dating
It is believed they could have been buried together in a pit.

Part of the wooden shaft of the bronze axe survived inside its socket.

The tree species has not yet been identified, and it is thought a wood sample could be used for radiocarbon-dating.

The faceted axe is of a recognised style known as Type Gillespie.

The National Museum believes the tin hook-shaped artefact is possibly an attachment or a handle to a larger object.

It may have been deliberately selected for burial because of the importance of tin as a metal at the time.

Tin was alloyed with copper, and sometimes lead, to make bronze.

The hoard will now be sent to the British Museum for temporary safe keeping until a valuation committee decide on the value, with views from an independent expert, the finder and landowner.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 13-05-2012 07:44    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner2 wrote:
Cornish Bronze Age boat project
20 April 2012 Last updated at 01:31

Archaeologists in Cornwall believe they have evidence that shows Bronze Age traders were maritime travellers and used hollowed-out wooden boats to cross the English Channel and buy and sell metals.

The Nebra Sky Disc - thought to be one of the oldest Bronze Age representations of the cosmos - was found in a field in Germany, but gold symbols on the bronze disc have been identified as coming from the Carnon Down mines in Cornwall.

The type of boats used by the Bronze Age traders are being recreated for a project at the National Maritime Museum in Falmouth. [video]

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-17775009

Carnon Downs is only a few miles from me...
...

Explore Cornwall’s prehistoric past at the Maritime Museum in Falmouth
7:00am Sunday 13th May 2012 in Falmouth/Penryn

Over the next two months visitors can discover more about Cornwall’s prehistoric past as the Maritime Museum in Falmouth plays host to academic lectures coinciding with the new 2012BC: Cornwall and the Sea in the Bronze Age exhibition.

The talks [began] on Wednesday May 9, with Dr Lucy Blue, from the University of Southampton, who will be examining how studying traditional boats, such as the sewn boats of the Indian Ocean, can inform on ancient boat building techniques in Bronze Age Britain.

Then on May 24, Prof Gregor Borg, from Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, will be exploring the fascinating story of the Nebra Sky Disc. Produced during the Bronze Age by metallurgists and astronomers from Cornish gold and tin which was traded across the sea to Europe, the Sky Disc is the world’s oldest astronomical map. The master copy of the Sky Disc is on display now at the Maritime Museum as part of the 2012BC exhibition – the first time it has ever been on display in the UK.

On May 31, Dr Linda Hurcombe will present an introduction to experimental archaeology. She will demonstrate how experiments can be fun, but also show us the skills and technologies of the past and give us a few surprises along the way.

As part of the 2012BC exhibition, a Bronze Age-type sewn-plank boat will be constructed at the Maritime Museum. On June 14 project director Prof Robert Van de Noort will be providing the archaeological background to the discoveries of sewn-plank boats in England and Wales, and explains how these craft were used in the Bronze Age.

And on June 21 discover why Cornwall was so important in the Bronze Age. Prof Anthony Harding will introduce the fascinating and varied evidence for far-reaching trade contacts with the wider world at the time of the reconstructed boat.

The lectures start at 7.30pm at the National Maritime Museum Cornwall and cost just £5 each.

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/fpfalmouth/9700943.Explore_Cornwall___s_prehistoric_past_at_the_Maritime_Museum_in_Falmouth/

The Nebra sky disc - wow! Astronomy, the sea, and ancient history, all in one! Cool
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PostPosted: 13-05-2012 08:03    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm sure there's a reproduction of the Nebra thingy (or something like it) in the Flag Fen Museum in Peterborough. Can't find any details online, sorry.
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PostPosted: 02-10-2012 12:24    Post subject: Reply with quote

More evidence of widespread travel and trade.

Quote:
Ancient Stinging Nettles Reveal Bronze Age Trade Connections
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120928093717.htm

The remains of the nettle cloth. (Credit: National Museum of Denmark)

ScienceDaily (Sep. 28, 2012) — A piece of nettle cloth retrieved from Denmark's richest known Bronze Age burial mound Lusehøj may actually derive from Austria, new findings suggest. The cloth thus tells a surprising story about long-distance Bronze Age trade connections around 800 BC.

2,800 years ago, one of Denmark's richest and most powerful men died. His body was burned. And the bereaved wrapped his bones in a cloth made from stinging nettle and put them in a stately bronze container, which also functioned as urn.

Now new findings suggest that the man's voyage to his final resting place may have been longer than such voyages usually were during the Bronze Age: the nettle cloth, which was wrapped around the deceased's bones, was not made in Denmark, and the evidence points to present-day Austria as the place of origin.

"I expected the nettles to have grown in Danish soil on the island of Funen, but when I analysed the plant fibres' strontium isotope levels, I could see that this was not the case," explains postdoc Karin Margarita Frei from the Danish National Research Foundation's Centre for Textile Research at the University of Copenhagen.

"The levels indicate that the nettles grew in an area with geologically old bedrock. We can only find rock with similar levels of strontium isotope in Sweden and Norway as well as in Central Europe."

Karin Margarita Frei had to conclude that Bronze Age Danes did not use local stinging nettle for their nettle textiles.

Strontium tells us where we come from

It is Karin Margarita Frei who has developed the method to determine plant textiles' strontium isotope levels that has led to the surprising discovery.

Strontium is an element which exists in Earth's crust, but its prevalence is subject to geological and topographical variation. Humans, animals, and plants absorb strontium through water and food. By measuring the strontium level in archaeological remains, researchers can determine where humans and animals lived, and where plants grew.

The new discovery is the result of a collaboration between an international team of researchers from the Danish National Research Foundation's Centre for Textile Research at the University of Copenhagen, the University of Bergen in Norway, and the National Museum of Denmark. The findings are described in an article that has just been published in Nature's online journal Scientific Reports.

Made in Austria

Karin Margarita Frei's work and the grave's archaeological remains suggest that the cloth may have been produced as far away as the Alps.

A bronze container, which had been used as urn, is of Central European origin and probably from the Kärnten-Steiermark region in Austria. The strontium isotope analysis of the cloth indicates that it may very well be from the same region. This assumption is supported by yet incomplete analyses of pitch found in the Lusehøj grave.

Textile archaeologist Ulla Mannering from the National Museum of Denmark offers an explanation as to how an Austrian cloth ended up in Funen, Denmark.

"Bronze Age Danes got their bronze from Central Europe, and imports were controlled by rich and powerful men. We can imagine how a bronze importer from Funen in Denmark died on a business trip to Austria. His bones were wrapped in an Austrian nettle cloth and placed in a stately urn that his travel companions transported back to Denmark," Ulla Mannering suggests.

Nettles made good textile

The strontium isotope analyses have surprised Ulla Mannering.

She concludes on the basis of the analyses that Central Europeans still used wild plants for textile production during the Bronze Age while at the same time cultivating textile plants such as flax on a large scale. Nettle textiles could apparently compete with textiles made from flax and other materials because top quality nettle fabrics are as good as raw silk.

The strontium isotope analyses also mean that Danish textile history needs revision.

"Until recently the Lusehøj nettle cloth was the oldest nettle cloth we knew, and the only Bronze Age nettle cloth, but with our new findings we actually have no evidence that nettle textiles were produced in Denmark at all during the Bronze Age," Ulla Mannering points out.

Story Source:

The above story is reprinted from materials provided by University of Copenhagen.

Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. For further information, please contact the source cited above.

Journal Reference:

C. Bergfjord, U. Mannering, K. M. Frei, M. Gleba, A. B. Scharff, I. Skals, J. Heinemeier, M. -L Nosch, B. Holst. Nettle as a distinct Bronze Age textile plant. Scientific Reports, 2012; 2 DOI: 10.1038/srep00664
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PostPosted: 02-10-2012 12:28    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another bronze Age discovery, perhaps Europe's greatest fortified city of the era.

Quote:
La Bastida Unearths 4,200-Year-Old Fortification, Unique in Continental Europe
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120927091542.htm

Frontal view of the fortification, with several of the walls and five of the towers visible. (Credit: Image by ASOME-UAB)

ScienceDaily (Sep. 27, 2012) — The archaeological excavations carried out this year at the site of La Bastida (Totana, Murcia) have shed light on an imposing fortification system, unique for its time. The discovery, together with all other discoveries made in recent years, reaffirm that the city was the most advanced settlement in Europe in political and military terms during the Bronze Age (ca. 4,200 years ago -- 2,200 BCE), and is comparable only to the Minoan civilisation of Crete.

The discovery was presented today by Pedro Alberto Cruz Sánchez, Secretary of Culture of the Region of Murcia and Vicente Lull, professor of Prehistory of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) and director of the excavation. The event also included the presence of Iván Martínez Flores, executive administrator of the research and head of the UAB Area for Strategic Projects.

The fortification consisted of a wall measuring two to three metres thick, built with large stones and lime mortar and supported by thick pyramid-based towers located at short distances of some four metres. The original height of the defensive wall was approximately 6 or 7 metres. Until now six towers have been discovered along a length of 70 metres, although the full perimeter of the fortification measured up to 300 metres. The entrance to the enclosure was a passageway constructed with strong walls and large doors at the end, held shut with thick wooden beams.

One of the most relevant architectural elements discovered is the ogival arched postern gate, or secondary door, located near the main entrance. The arch is in very good conditions and is the first one to be found in Prehistoric Europe. Precedents can be found in the second city of Troy (Turkey) and in the urban world of the Middle East (Palestine, Israel and Jordan), influenced by the civilisations of Mesopotamia and Egypt. This indicates that people from the East participated in the construction of the fortification. These people would have reached La Bastida after the crisis which devastated their region 4,300 years ago. It was not until some 400 to 800 years later that civilisations like the Hittites and Mycenaeans, or city-states such as Ugarit, incorporated these innovative methods into their military architecture.

A Construction Designed for Combat

The fortification of La Bastida is an impressive construction due to its monumentality, the expertise demonstrated in architecture and engineering, its antiquity and because it helps us today to learn about such a distant past which is also easily recognisable in the present. It also represents an innovation in the art of attacking and defending fortifications, especially on the military front. The construction was designed solely for military purposes, by people experienced in fighting methods unknown in those times to the West.

The towers and exterior walls denote advanced knowledge of architecture and engineering, with slopes of over 40 per cent. The lime mortar used offered exceptional solidity to the construction, strongly holding the stones and making the wall impermeable, as well as eliminating any elements attackers could hold on to.

The postern gate, as a hidden and covered entrance, demanded great planning of the defensive structure as a whole and of the correct engineering technique to fit it perfectly into the wall.

Continental Europe's First Bronze Age City

The latest excavations and the result of Carbon 14 dating indicate that La Bastida was probably the most powerful city of Europe during the Bronze Age and a fortified site since it was first built, in circa 2,200 BCE, with a defence system never before seen in Europe.

The fortification was not the only discovery made. From 2008 to 2011, excavations unearthed large residences measuring over 70 square metres distributed throughout the city's four hectares. These large houses and public buildings were alternated with other smaller constructions, all separated by entries, passageways and squares. A large pool held by a 20-metre dyke with a capacity for almost 400,000 litres of water also clearly denotes that the city's population was of a complexity and that it used advanced techniques incomparable to other cities of its time.

The discoveries made at La Bastida reveal a military, political and social rupture: the establishment of a violent and classist ruling society, which lasted seven centuries and conditioned the development of other communities living in the Iberian Peninsula. Overall, archaeologists are redefining what is known of the origin of economic and political inequalities in Europe, as well as military institution and the role played by violence in the formation of identities.

A Unique Archaeological Park in Spain

The excavations at La Bastida are directed by the Research Group in Mediterranean Social Archaeoecology (ASOME) of Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), formed by lecturers Vicente Lull, Rafael Micó, Cristina Rihuete and Roberto Risch. The research group receives the support and funding of the Department of Culture Regional Cultural Ministry of Murcia, the UAB, and the Totana City Council. The Spanish Ministries of Industry, Trade and Tourism, and of Economics and Competitiveness also give financial support to the project.

La Bastida will be systematically excavated with the aim of becoming a unique archaeological park open to the public and consisting in a monographic museum, a research and documentation centre, and part of the site open to visitors. Advancing and maintaining this project will depend on the commitment shown by the different public institutions and social agents taking part in the excavation of La Bastida.

More information on La Bastida: http://www.la-bastida.com/LaBastida/

Story Source:

The above story is reprinted from materials provided by Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, via AlphaGalileo.
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Zilch5Offline
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PostPosted: 23-10-2012 03:31    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Breakthrough in world's oldest undeciphered writing

The world's oldest undeciphered writing system, which has so far defied attempts to uncover its 5,000-year-old secrets, could be about to be decoded by Oxford University academics.

This international research project is already casting light on a lost bronze age middle eastern society where enslaved workers lived on rations close to the starvation level.

"I think we are finally on the point of making a breakthrough," says Jacob Dahl, fellow of Wolfson College, Oxford and director of the Ancient World Research Cluster.

Dr Dahl's secret weapon is being able to see this writing more clearly than ever before.

In a room high up in the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, above the Egyptian mummies and fragments of early civilisations, a big black dome is clicking away and flashing out light.

This device, part sci-fi, part-DIY, is providing the most detailed and high quality images ever taken of these elusive symbols cut into clay tablets. This is Indiana Jones with software.

It's being used to help decode a writing system called proto-Elamite, used between around 3200BC and 2900BC in a region now in the south west of modern Iran.

And the Oxford team think that they could be on the brink of understanding this last great remaining cache of undeciphered texts from the ancient world. etc etc etc


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-19964786
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 13-11-2012 19:48    Post subject: Reply with quote

Axe-tail soup?

Quote:
Bronze Age pot contains 21 axe heads
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-jersey-20312504

The remaining axe heads are due to be removed and examined by Jersey Heritage

Related Stories

Bronze Age pottery find in Jersey
Celtic tribe left Jersey coins
Iron Age coin hoard goes on show

A Bronze Age pot found in Jersey contains 21 socketed-axe heads, X-rays have revealed.

Ken Rive, a member of the Jersey metal detecting society, made the find in a field in Trinity last month.

Two axe heads have been removed from the pot and examined by staff at Cranfield University.

They found they contained a lot of lead, which suggests the 3,000-year-old axes were not functional tools but objects of prestige, researchers said.

With almost 55% of the axe being made of lead the axe would not have had a very sharp edge.

Five major finds of Bronze Age tools, weapons and jewellery have been uncovered in Jersey between 1836 and 2001. It is thought the islands may have been a staging post for traders.

Jersey Heritage plans to remove the remaining axe heads from the pot and examine all 23 to learn more about them and life in Jersey 3,000 years ago.
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PostPosted: 18-02-2013 08:01    Post subject: Reply with quote

'Amazing' bronze age burial site treasures on Dartmoor
17 February 2013 Last updated at 23:38
[video]

Samantha Smith looks at what has been called the most significant historical find ever on Dartmoor - the discovery of an internationally important prehistoric burial site.
The 4,000-year-old remains of the Bronze Age grave or cist, which were found in a peat bog, are set to rewrite the history books.

BBC Inside Out has been given exclusive access to the results of the dig on White Horse Hill, which include an intact cremation deposit, an animal pelt, textiles, ear stud and beads.
Experts say it is unusual for so many organic objects to survive for this length of time in a grave from the Bronze Age period.

Dartmoor National Park Authority, the Wiltshire Conservation Service and other specialists have begun to piece together the story of this important discovery.
Work has moved to laboratories where painstaking investigation is taking place which, it is hoped, will reveal more about the lives of prehistoric people on Dartmoor.

Inside Out South West is broadcast on Monday, 18 February on BBC One at 19:30 GMT and nationwide on the iPlayer for seven days thereafter.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-21445658
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 18-02-2013 09:02    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner2 wrote:
'Amazing' bronze age burial site treasures on Dartmoor
17 February 2013 Last updated at 23:38
[video]

...

Inside Out South West is broadcast on Monday, 18 February on BBC One at 19:30 GMT and nationwide on the iPlayer for seven days thereafter.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-21445658


Another report, without video, is here:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-21442474

Whitehorse Hill (as the OS calls it) lies about 9 km WSW of the village of Chagford, on the eastern side of Dartmoor.

An article from last June is here:

http://www.megalithic.co.uk/article.php?sid=29778
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PostPosted: 18-02-2013 09:28    Post subject: Reply with quote

What an excellent find! Very Happy

Really like the little tin beads and the 'ear studs'. I wonder if they'll be able to source the amber?

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/archaeology/one-of-the-most-significant-findings-of-the-last-100-years-human-remains-and-bronze-age-artefacts-discovered-on-dartmoor-hint-at-ancient-trading-links-8499039.html
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PostPosted: 07-03-2013 08:37    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner2 wrote:
Cornish Bronze Age boat project
20 April 2012 Last updated at 01:31

Archaeologists in Cornwall believe they have evidence that shows Bronze Age traders were maritime travellers and used hollowed-out wooden boats to cross the English Channel and buy and sell metals.

The Nebra Sky Disc - thought to be one of the oldest Bronze Age representations of the cosmos - was found in a field in Germany, but gold symbols on the bronze disc have been identified as coming from the Carnon Down mines in Cornwall.

The type of boats used by the Bronze Age traders are being recreated for a project at the National Maritime Museum in Falmouth. [video]

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-17775009

Shaky maiden voyage for replica Bronze Age boat
[video]
6 March 2013 Last updated at 17:21

A replica Bronze Age boat which was built using traditional techniques has made its maiden voyage in Falmouth, Cornwall.
The construction was part of a collaborative effort between the National Maritime Museum and the University of Exeter.

The BBC's Jon Kay took a closer look at how the boat was built and was onboard as it took to the water

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-21681465
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PostPosted: 07-03-2013 09:14    Post subject: Reply with quote

A longer account:

Bronze age boat launches in Falmouth: PICTURE GALLERY
2:17pm Wednesday 6th March 2013 in News .

Today history was made in Cornwall as a unique project to recreate a 4000 year old boat reached its dramatic conclusion as it launched into the waters of Falmouth Harbour.

Slipping majestically into the calm waters of Falmouth bay [No! The Harbour, as the first para said!] the 50ft long, 5 tonne vessel launched to a rapturous reception from the gathered crowd of onlookers.

A first for experimental archaeology and a first for the National Maritime Museum Cornwall, the 50ft long 5 tonne prehistoric boat has been reconstructed as part of a collaborative project with the University of Exeter. A team of volunteers, led by shipwright Brian Cumby, have spent the last year building this one of a kind craft out of two massive oak logs using replica methods and tools, such as bronze headed axes.

Andy Wyke, Boat Collection Manager at the Maritime Museum, said: “It has been incredible to see this whole project take shape in the Museum building over the past 11 months. Volunteers have poured everything into transforming three oak trees to what we have seen and achieved today. It’s been an incredible journey and one that will be remembered not only in our and Falmouth’s history. All the discoveries made have proven maritime history. Academic theory has come to life. We’re all so proud.”

This collaborative boat building project is led by Professor Robert Van de Noort from the University of Exeter. One of the world’s leading experts in Bronze Age period boats, he is heading up the Arts and Humanities Research Council funded project and hasn’t been shy in getting hands-on with the build and today paddled the boat with supporting volunteers.

Professor Van de Noort says of today’s events: “I’m so happy with the responsiveness of the boat. We always said you had to build the whole boat to understand what Bronze Age people experienced. When I was steering the boat and it got up to speed, I could turn her easily and it was more seaworthy than I expected. We have learnt so much through the whole process and today’s launch has revolutionised everything we knew.”
“There have been doubters, professionally, who questioned the feasibility of this vessel crossing the seas. This project has proven that it was possible.”

Dr Linda Hurcombe, Archaeologist at University of Exeter concludes: “You think a lot as an academic, you prepare, you do the writing you make a grant application and then you actually achieve a research project and this was the culmination of a very large scale project that has worked out brilliantly. To sit inside something that has not been seen in British waters for 4000 years and paddle it, and to see the carving of the wood, the tallow and the yew stitching all working together is a sight to behold.”

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/10270618.Bronze_age_boat_launches_in_Falmouth__PICTURE_GALLERY/?ref=mr

"..it was more seaworthy than I expected."
"There have been doubters, professionally, who questioned the feasibility of this vessel crossing the seas. This project has proven that it was possible."

A bit strong to claim that much, after a quick trip on "calm waters". Perhaps it could "cross the seas", but only in fine weather - and that's MY professional opinion!

When you get out in waves (and assuming they didn't swamp the craft) the hull would experience flexing: one minute a wave would support the middle of the boat, so the ends would tend to droop; the next minute the ends might be supported, causing the middle to sag. All this would put considerable strain on the fastenings of "yew stitching". If they do try it out in the Bay, I hope they have a big safety boat in attendance!
Cool
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