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Bronze Age Discoveries.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 08-03-2013 08:40    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bronze age boat launches in Falmouth - See how it was built: VIDEOS
2:34pm Thursday 7th March 2013 in News .

HISTORY was made in Cornwall this week as a unique project to recreate a 4000 year old boat reached its dramatic conclusion as it launched into the waters of Falmouth Harbour.

Professional boatbuilder Brian Cumby and a team of volunteers re-created the large replica Bronze Age stitched boat using traditional tools and materials. These video shows the progress from the first steps to the completion.

There are nine videos in total, scroll down to view.

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/10274467.Bronze_age_boat_launches_in_Falmouth___See_how_it_was_built__VIDEOS/?ref=mr

I've just watched No.6 - it's good quality time lapse photography (but with a slightly irritating musical sound track). Slightly bigger pictures on the YouTube version, plus full screen. A useful resource for would-be bronze age boatbuilders! Wink
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 08-03-2013 09:05    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner2 wrote:
"..it was more seaworthy than I expected."
"There have been doubters, professionally, who questioned the feasibility of this vessel crossing the seas. This project has proven that it was possible."

A bit strong to claim that much, after a quick trip on "calm waters". Perhaps it could "cross the seas", but only in fine weather - and that's MY professional opinion!

When you get out in waves (and assuming they didn't swamp the craft) the hull would experience flexing: one minute a wave would support the middle of the boat, so the ends would tend to droop; the next minute the ends might be supported, causing the middle to sag. All this would put considerable strain on the fastenings of "yew stitching". If they do try it out in the Bay, I hope they have a big safety boat in attendance!
Cool

I've just watched the whole of the launch day video,
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=zM9tdqnYNLU#!
..and as the boat is moved from the Museum to the launch ramp on a long, many-wheeled trolley, you can clearly see the hull flexing as it moves along the road! (Hogging and sagging are the technical terms)

That was perhaps a better test of its seaworthiness than the quiet waters of the harbour! Very Happy
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PostPosted: 03-04-2013 08:06    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/fpfalmouth/10327359.Second_sea_trials_for_Falmouth_Bronze_Age_boat___VIDEO/

(Actually, it's another 'calm inner-harbour trial' Wink )

Annoyingly, the webpage has plastered an ad right over the video! Evil or Very Mad
But you can get rid of that by clicking Full Screen. Good quality video, but the action's not that interesting!

I'm looking forward to real sea trials! Twisted Evil
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PostPosted: 18-07-2013 19:16    Post subject: Reply with quote

I went to the NMMC today to get some photos of the residential cruise ship The World, but as a bonus I got a couple of shots of the replica bronze age boat as well! Cool

She was on the NMMC pontoon, and a few people standing around with crudely made paddles suggested it might be going on another 'test run'.
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PostPosted: 14-09-2013 08:47    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excavation may reveal secret of the Hurlers
Saturday, September 14, 2013 Western Morning News
By SIMON PARKER

A Bronze Age crystal pavement described as "unique" by archaeologists is to be uncovered for the first time since the 1930s.

The monument, at the Hurlers stone circle on Bodmin Moor, is believed to be the only one of its kind in the British Isles. Scientists and historians hope that by studying it they will gain a better understanding of early civilisations.

Organised by the Caradon Hill Area Heritage Project, "Mapping the Sun" will be led by a team from Cornwall Council's Historic Environment department. Archaeologists will be setting up at the site close to the village of Minions this weekend and the excavation will be open to the public between Tuesday and Saturday.

Described as a community archaeology project, a range of activities will take place throughout the week. These will include astronomy workshops with Brian Sheen from Roseland Observatory, a sunrise equinox walk, a geophysical survey, a display of Bronze Age artefacts and an exhibition of archive photographs. There will also be opportunities to actually lend a hand in the delicate task of excavating the pavement.

The only time the 4,000-year-old causeway is thought to have been uncovered since it was originally laid took place 75 years ago, when workmen stabilised the site and re-erected a number of stones.

The existence of the quartz pavement only came to light again when Cornwall archaeologist Jacky Nowakowski was undertaking unrelated research at an English Heritage store in Gloucestershire. As she looked through files, Jacky came across an unpublished report and photographs from the Ministry of Works' excavation of the Hurlers in 1938.
"I couldn't believe it," she said. "I'd certainly not seen anything like it before. A feature such as this, which suggests a possible linking of the circles, is very unusual. The pavement is nationally unique as far as I know."

Internationally renowned for its line of three impressive stone circles, the Hurlers' original use has long been the subject of speculation and argument. Some believe its alignment mirrors the celestial bodies that make up Orion's Belt, while others claim it was used for religious purposes. Whatever the truth, there is no doubt that it was of major importance to the people who inhabited the moor 4,000 years ago.

The entire area around the Hurlers is peppered with archaeology. From a burial barrow, which contained the Rillaton Gold Cup, to Stowes Pound hill fort, Minions Mound to Long Tom, medieval streamworks to 19th century engine houses, the landscape is of enormous interest to historians. Jacky Nowakowski will explain many of the features when she leads a two-hour walk around the ancient monuments next Monday and Friday.

"I really hope the entire project and the series of linked events at this multi-faceted site will excite people," she said. "Our role will be to inform people about the site and to learn more about why it was built. Our other role is to help safeguard it for the future."

One important aspect of the dig will be to attempt to accurately date both the circle and pavement.
Jacky and her team have been given permission to excavate a portion of the original layer beneath the pavement in order to gauge whether it is contemporary with the circles. She said the discovery of pollen or other material will assist in dating the monument.

Mapping the Sun has been organised by Iain Rowe, of Caradon Hill Area Heritage Project. Iain, who had to obtain special permission from the Secretary of State for the Environment, said he was grateful to everyone involved in bringing it to fruition.
"We've had great support from the Duchy, which owns the site, English Heritage, which leases it, and Cornwall Heritage Trust, which manages it," he said. "We've also had a lot of help from commoners, graziers and local people.
"It promises to be a very interesting week because no-one is sure what will be revealed and what we may learn about the pavement's origins."

The site would be backfilled and the ground fully restored following next week's excavation. "There will be no sign we have been there," he added.

For full details of the week's events, visit caradonhill.org.uk

Read more: http://www.thisisdevon.co.uk/Excavation-reveal-secret-Hurlers/story-19797335-detail/story.html#ixzz2er2qrsK4
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PostPosted: 24-09-2013 21:16    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Hurlers stone circles pathway uncovered on Bodmin Moor
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-24228338

Bronze Age stone pathway

The dig was a community archaeological project with local people and enthusiasts helping the experts

A Bronze Age stone pathway that links stone circles has been uncovered for the first time since the 1930s.

Archaeologists were helped by local people to "re-discover" the feature, laid between two of the Hurlers stone circles on Bodmin Moor, Cornwall.

The 4,000-year-old pavement has been described as "unique" by archaeologists.

They hope it will give a better understanding of early civilisations.

The causeway was first uncovered more than 70 years ago, when workmen stabilised the site and re-erected a number of stones.

But its existence only came to light again when Cornish archaeologist, Jacky Nowakowski, found a reference to it in an unpublished report from the Ministry of Works' excavation of the Hurlers.

The Hurlers are a close grouping of three late Neolithic or early Bronze Age stone circles.

The excavation is part of a wider project organised by the Caradon Hill Area Heritage Project called "Mapping the Sun".

The dig will be led by a team from Cornwall Council's historic environment department.

After seven days of digging, the pavement will be re-covered to protect and preserve it.
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PostPosted: 27-09-2013 23:29    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Bronze Age 'boat building' discovery in Monmouth
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-24271564

Reconstruction of the channels in the clay earth by Peter Bere

An artist's impression of how the channels could have been left in the ground at Monmouth

Archaeologists believe they have found the remains of a Bronze Age boat building community in Monmouth.

Excavations show 100ft-long (30m) channels in the clay along which experts think vessels were dragged into a long-gone prehistoric lake.

Monmouth Archaeological Society started to unearth new findings when work started on Parc Glyndwr housing estate two years ago.

The research is being published in a book called The Lost Lake.

Author and archaeologist Stephen Clarke, 71, said: "I started digging here with the society 50 years ago - I wish I had another 50 years."

He said finds had helped the group to better understand the ancient history of Monmouth long before Roman times.

The town is served by three rivers but the group said it had evidence to suggest it was actually built on what was a huge prehistoric lake which became a home to hunter gatherers.

Over millennia it drained away and finds including charcoal from fires, flint shards and pottery from the Stone Age, Iron Age and Roman times have been found by the town's professional and amateur archaeologists.

Reconstruction of a boat by Peter Bere
Reconstruction of a boat which may have made the marks in the ground
They have been excavated in sites around the town and in different layers of clay, sand, gravel and peat as the earth-bed composition changed from lake, lagoon, marsh and dry land, according to Mr Clarke.

Among the discoveries are a pair of "dead-straight" metre-wide channels in the clay shaped like the bottom of wooden canoes - along with a third smaller groove.

Mr Clarke said it supported the theory of a vessel having a support arm, adding he was seeking the opinion of marine archaeologists.

These channels were found over a mound of burned earth which has been carbon dated to the Bronze Age although other finds around the area date back to the Stone Age.

"I have seen 14-tonne machinery sliding in the clay so it would have been easy to push a boat," said Mr Clarke.

He believes the finds suggest a settlement and boat building industry although no boat timbers have been found.

"There is a lot to explain," said Mr Clarke, adding that the area "must have been alive with activity for thousands of years".

"It is so new [the findings] that most people in the country do not know about it," he said.

Monnow Bridge

Monnow Bridge would have been under the prehistoric lake, says Mr Clarke
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PostPosted: 23-11-2013 10:04    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
World War Two Ipswich airfield site reveals Bronze Age finds
Archaeological site in Ipswich
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-suffolk-25057532

Archaeologist have two weeks to research the 2.2-acre (0.89 hectare) site to the south-east of Ipswich

An archaeological dig on the site of a former World War Two airfield in Suffolk has revealed evidence of Bronze Age burial chambers.

The site, on the outskirts of Ipswich, is being excavated in readiness for a new care home due to open in 2015.

Fragments of pottery and urns indicated the site was "very close to a burial mound", archaeologists said.

The finds will be recorded and stored at Suffolk County Council's archaeology department.

Mark Hinman from Pre-Construct Archaeology said: "This is very much preservation by record, we record it so people can get on and build.

Dig site in Ipswich
The site has revealed fragments of decorated pottery
"We've found fragments of beaker pottery, which is quite decorated with zigzag designs and collared urn vessels.

"These were usually used in the burial of human remains in the Bronze Age period, so these items give us a sense we're very close to a burial mound.

"It's still early days but we're digging various ditches. Nearby excavations have shown this area was a popular settlement for farming and the burial mounds indicate a high population in the period.

"They also show a claim of ownership on the land and how we were moving from a mobile hunter/gathering society into the settled farmers we became as a nation."

The new care home, built on the site of the former Ipswich Airport, will provide nursing and dementia care services for up to 80 residents, along with day care activities.

Councillor Alan Murray, cabinet member for health and adult care, said: "These finds will help us to understand more about the history of this area and the Bronze Age in general."

The Ravenswood development is part of a £60m Care UK investment programme in partnership with Suffolk County Council.
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PostPosted: 03-03-2014 00:46    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Rare Neolithic or Bronze Age rock art in Ross-shire
By Steven McKenzie
BBC Scotland Highlands and Islands reporter
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-26366644

Rock with cup and ring markings

The rock decorated with cup and ring marks

A rare example of prehistoric rock art has been uncovered in the Highlands.

Archaeologists made the discovery while moving a boulder decorated with ancient cup and ring marks to a new location in Ross-shire.

When they turned the stone over they found the same impressions on the other side of the rock. It is one of only a few decorated stones of its kind.

John Wombell, of North of Scotland Archaeological Society (NOSAS), said: "This is an amazing discovery."

Susan Kruse, of Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands (ARCH), first discovered the stone at Heights of Fodderty several years ago when out walking.

The second set of cup and ring marks were uncovered recently when archaeologists were moving the stone to a new site at nearby Heights of Brae Neil Gunn Viewpoint.

From the Neolithic or Bronze Age, the art was created between 4,000 and 5,000 years ago.

Rock with cup and ring markings
The newly-discovered markings on the opposite side of the stone
Archaeologists believe the markings may have been made for a number of reasons.

These include for rituals, as territorial markers or mapping the stars. They could even be the "doodlings" of bored, ancient shepherds.

Ms Kruse said: "Finding cup and ring decoration on the opposite side has raised a number of tantalising questions.

"Was the decoration meant to be viewed from both sides or was one decorated side deliberately placed face down?

"Or was the stone carved at different times?"

John Wombell and Susan Kruse
John Wombell and Susan Kruse with the stone at its new location
Mr Wombell, who is leading a project to record rock art in the Highlands and Grampian, said it was an important discovery.

He said: "Although some stones are decorated on different faces, I only know of a few other stones with decoration on opposite sides."

The archaeologist said most boulders with markings were too heavy to turn over to find out if they were decorated on the reverse side.

The stone in the new discovery was moved by crofters about 200 years ago when they used it for building a dyke.

There is a cluster of rock art in the local area.

A Neolithic chambered burial cairn and round houses dating to the Bronze and Iron Ages have also been found.

Another major discovery in the area was the Heights of Brae hoard, the largest surviving late Bronze Age gold find in Scotland.

A farmer uncovered the jewellery while ploughing a field in the 1960s.
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PostPosted: 18-03-2014 08:20    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll park this here, pro tem

Storms expose ancient human remains on Cornish beach

Efforts are under way to identify ancient human remains found on a Cornish beach.
Archaeologists believe the bones, exposed by storms in a cliff at Harlyn bay near Padstow, could be those of a young iron age or bronze age woman.
Once they have been radiocarbon dated it is hoped they will go on show at the Royal Cornwall Museum.

Archaeologist Andy Jones said there had been a lot of Bronze and Iron Age burials in the area.
Mr Jones, from Cornwall Council's historic environment service, said: "Based on what has been found before from the vicinity we thought there was a very good chance they were either going to be Bronze Aged or Iron Aged."

A member of the public reported the discovery to the police after noticing the cliff face had changed and the bones were in view following this year's winter storms. The passerby suspected the remains to be human.
Police and council officers then visited the site and an exhumation followed.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-26621146

If the bones are Iron Age, I'll have to re-post.
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PostPosted: 19-03-2014 08:20    Post subject: Reply with quote

More on Harlyn Bay:

Skeleton found in Cornish cliff face cavity inside bronze age stone burial chest
2:30pm Tuesday 18th March 2014 in News .

A phone call reporting that parts of a skeleton had been found in a cavity in a Cornish cliff face may sound like a plot for TV detective show, but for two Cornwall Council staff it marked the beginning of an intriguing investigation.

The council was contacted by the police after a call from a member of the public who had seen what they thought were human remains in a cavity the cliff face at Harlyn Bay.

The Public Health and Protection service are responsible for investigating these reports and, following an investigation which established this was a finding of interest, it was necessary to apply for an emergency licence from the Ministry of Justice to carry out an exhumation. This licence is granted under Section 25 of the Burial Act 1857.
Once it had been established that the bones were of historical significance the Council’s Historic Environment service was tasked with removing them.

Andy Jones, an Archaeologist Team Leader with the Historic Environment service and expert in Bronze Age ceremonial monuments, said: “This area is one of the most important for prehistoric burials in Cornwall” said Andy.
“The sand protects bone from the acidic soil conditions making it one of the few places in Cornwall where unburnt bone will survive”.

Andy and his team visited the site and found that the cavity was in fact a cist (a stone burial chest) which had been set into the ground. “Our investigation of the cist revealed that it contained a partial burial (the full skeleton does not seem to have been buried) of a young person - possibly female. There were no grave goods and the only find was a quartz block. “ The bones were carefully removed from the cavity and taken back to Andy’s base at New County Hall for further investigation, including radiocarbon dating.

This latest find is located close to several other burials of Bronze Age date (3500-4000 years ago), which have been exposed by earlier cliff falls and a large Iron Age (2500-2000 years ago) cist grave cemetery is located nearby.

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/11084123.Skeleton_found_in_Cornish_cliff_face_cavity_inside_bronze_age_stone_burial_chest/?ref=mr
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PostPosted: 20-05-2014 08:44    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rare Bronze Age gold crescent moon discovered in Dorset field
By Stour & Avon Magazine | Posted: May 20, 2014
By Roger Guttridge

When David Spohr dug into a Dorset cow-field after his metal detector emitted a signal, he thought at first that he’d found nothing more than an old sardine tin.
But as he dug deeper, he could scarcely believe his eyes.
For the 55-year-old precision grinder from Creekmoor, Poole, realised he had struck gold – literally.
“I could see it was yellow and so shiny,” he said.
“I also saw some engraved edges and I realised it was something special.”

The object, buried under 10 inches of soil in the Tarrant Valley field, was a Bronze Age gold lunula in the shape of a crescent moon.
It was probably used by a tribal leader, high priest or healer as a symbol of authority.
The lunula, which weighs 71.5 grams, is one of only a handful found in mainland Britain and is thought to be the first located by a metal detector.
It is even more unusual to find one so far inland.

Members of the Stour Valley Search and Recovery Club say the lunula is the most exciting find in their 30-year history.
They believe it is between 2,500 and 4,500 years old but are hoping the British Museum, who are currently examining it, will be able to narrow down the date.

A team of experts will also give a valuation, which is expected to be in the thousands of pounds.
It would have been worth even more but unfortunately one of the lunula’s “paddles” was missing.
“I’ve heard everything from £2,000 to £20,000 but I’m not getting too excited until I get the letter,” said David.
A treasure inquest will also be held and the value will be split between David as the finder and the landowner.

David, whose previous finds include a Bronze Age ring that is now in the Dorset County Museum, had spent a fruitless morning with some of his fellow club members when he decided to stop for lunch.
“I headed across the field to get my sandwiches and kept the detector on as I walked,” he said.
“Halfway across I got the signal. I dug very carefully and was quite amazed when I got it out.
“We do find a lot of rubbish and you never think you’re going to find a lump of gold.” Cool

There was great excitement as fellow members of the Stour Valley Search and Recovery Club gathered round along with the landowner, who was alerted to the find by phone.
And David never did get to eat his sandwiches.
The club notified their finds liaison officer Ciorstaidh Hayward-Trevarthen at County Hall and the coroner was informed.

Research by club members suggests that more than 80 of the 100 lunulas found in the past were in Ireland and several others on the coast of mainland Europe.
In mainland Britain, one was found in Wales in 1869 and three on the coast of Cornwall*.

Read more at http://www.blackmorevale.co.uk/Rare-Bronze-Age-gold-crescent-moon-discovered/story-21114119-detail/story.html#OTp5RDihGSo3zSIt.99

* See http://www.forteantimes.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=1207420#1207420

PS: The River Tarrant flows from Tarrant Gunville in the north, through five other 'Tarrants' to Tarrant Crawford in the south, just before it joins the Dorset Stour! Very Happy
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PostPosted: 02-07-2014 20:58    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Seahenge: Second Holme-next-the-Sea wooden circle dated to 2049BC

A second Bronze Age wooden circle discovered on a Norfolk beach has been dated to the same year as its neighbour, known as Seahenge.

Archaeologists have been testing wood from the second henge at Holme-next-the-Sea and believe it was also built using trees felled in 2049BC.

Both wooden circles were revealed in the sand near Hunstanton in the 1990s.

Experts said the study showed both structures were probably linked to the same burial.

Seahenge was excavated in 1998-99, despite protests, and put on display at Lynn Museum, King's Lynn.

Norfolk County Council said there were no plans to move the second circle.

When it was revealed at Norfolk Wildlife Trust's Holme Dunes nature reserve, the second henge had two logs laid flat in the centre of a wooden oval.

These have since been washed away and the remaining structure is now completely covered by sand.

The process of dating the wood using tree rings, called dendrochronology, started last year.

David Robertson, historic environment officer at Norfolk County Council, said the research showed the two circles "must have been directly linked".

"The reasons why the second circle was built are not clear," he said.

"It may have formed part of a burial mound and the two central logs may originally have supported a coffin.

"Seahenge is thought to have been a free-standing timber circle, possibly to mark the death of an individual, acting as a cenotaph, symbolising death rather than a location for burial.

"If part of a burial mound, the second circle would have been the actual burial place."

The study's full results are due to be published soon.
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PostPosted: 05-08-2014 07:45    Post subject: Reply with quote

According to the Beeb, this find is from the Copper Age. But Wiki says:

"The Chalcolithic (...)[1] period or Copper Age,[1] also known as the Eneolithic[1]/Æneolithic (from Latin aeneus "of bronze"), is a phase of the Bronze Age before metallurgists discovered that adding tin to copper formed the harder bronze.
The Copper Age was originally defined as a transition between the Neolithic and the Bronze Age. However, because it is characterized by the use of metals, the Copper Age is considered a part of the Bronze Age rather than the Stone Age. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copper_Age "


Alston pupils unearth 4,000-year-old gold hair tress

A group of schoolboys has unearthed a rare 4,000-year-old ornament during a dig in Northumberland.
The children, from Alston Primary School in Cumbria, were taking part in an excavation at Kirkhaugh when they saw a glint of gold in the soil.
The object, which was found in a burial mound, is believed to be a decorated hair tress from about 2,300 BC.

One of the boys, Joseph Bell, aged seven, said when he saw the gold in the ground he started "dancing with joy". Very Happy
The ornament, which is 1.3in (33mm) long and dates back to the Copper Age, was found alongside three flint arrowheads and a jet button.
It is thought to have been worn by a metal worker who could have travelled to Britain from overseas in search of gold and copper.

Eight-year-old Luca Alderson, said: "When I first saw it I felt happy but I thought it was plastic. When I found out it was gold, I was very happy."
This find is believed to be the partner of a matching one discovered at Kirkhaugh during an excavation in 1935 led by Herbert Maryon.

The dig was arranged by the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty as part of an archaeology project.
Paul Frodsham, who lead the project, said: "All archaeological sites are important in their own way, but this is exceptional.
"It can be regarded as marking the very start of mineral exploitation in the North Pennines, leading in due course to Roman exploitation of lead and silver, and eventually to the vast post-medieval lead industry for which the region is internationally famous."

After being analysed by specialists, it is hoped the head tress will be reunited with the one found in 1935 which is housed at the Great North Museum in Newcastle.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-28645612
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