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Come to Irian Jaya see the lovely thylacines.

 
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oldroverOffline
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PostPosted: 13-03-2013 18:43    Post subject: Come to Irian Jaya see the lovely thylacines. Reply with quote

In my opinion this is a separate issue to any questions abut the thylacine in Tasmania or the mainland.

Fairly often the question comes up these days about whether PNG or Irian Jaya might be a possible place to find a relict population of thylacines. Personally I think it's entirely possible that they could survive there but not likely, too many muts. Also there's not really any good reason to assume that they do. Obviously there comes the odd report or anecdote, but you get that from Loch Ness too, and there's been plenty of time for the idea of a thylacine there to be reintroduced the local populace.

Here's an article I found on another site, it's referenced but there's no link there to the original.

Quote:
Irian Jayans Spy 'Tasie Tiger'.



By Patrick Walters .

TASMANIAN tigers have been sighted in the wilds of Irian Jaya, according
to local press reports, and are blamed by villagers for a spate of
attacks on domestic livestock.


According to reports in recent weeks, there have been a number of
sightings of wild animals resembling the thylacine species in the rugged
highlands of the Jayawijaya region of Irian Jaya.

Jayawijaya regency local government head U.B. Wenas has reportedly
offered a R2 million bonus ($1000) to any person who manages to capture
a Tasmanian tiger, according to the Antara news agency.

Press reports say the tigers have been sighted in the Abenaho district,
70km north-east of Wamena, and have preyed on domestic animals including pigs and chickens.

Reports cited local officials as saying the rare animal resembled a
large dog with light brown fur and dark stripes along its back. Roving
packs of the dog-like creatures had preyed on livestock at night.

"At any time when the Tasmanian tigers attack the livestock, the local
people are very afraid and stay inside their closed houses, for they
fear the animals will kill them if they try to wound the predators,"
Antara quoted a district official as saying.

While the World Wildlife Fund office in Jayapura has no hard evidence
pointing to the existence of a thylacine species in Irian Jaya, it is
planning a more thorough investigation.

A spokesman in Jakarta, Ron Lilley, said yesterday the WWF had received
reports of a species of wild dog roaming the Pass valley in the Abenaho
district. Villagers had killed three of the animals, he said.

The thylacine has been reportedly extinct since the 1930s, with the last
known specimen dying in a Hobart zoo.

In recent years, there have been numerous reported sightings of an
unusual wild dog in the relatively unexplored Lorentz national park in
central Irian Jaya. In 1993, a WWF field researcher found dog-like paw
prints, resembling a thylacine, above the snowline in the Jayawijaya
range.

Research in the central highlands has all but ceased since scientists
were taken hostage and held by OPM guerillas for more than four months
last year. The Indonesian Government has since closed the region.
The mountains of Irian Jaya are a rich reserve of plant and animal
species. Only four years ago, a new species of tree kangaroo was found
there.

"It appears to be one of the richest areas for endemic species in the
island of New Guinea," Mr Lilley said yesterday.

Both Mr Lilley and a leading expert on New Guinean mammals, Tim
Flannery, of the Australian Museum, Sydney, expressed scepticism about
the thylacine sightings. "It's theoretically possible but there's
absolutely no hard evidence.

Thylacines disappeared from the Australian mainland 3000 years ago.
There has never been any fossil remains found in Irian Jaya but fossils
have been found in Papua New Guinea," Dr Flannery said.

(c) Nationwide News 1997.



http://www.armbell.com/mysteriousaustr/viewtopic.php?t=75&mforum=mysteriousaustr
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Zilch5Offline
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PostPosted: 13-03-2013 23:24    Post subject: Reply with quote

Many years ago I saw a German documentary about a scientist looking for the mega-rare and possibly not yet extinct Black Tree Kangaroo of Irian Jaya.

After 3 months of trudging through the jungle in terribly harsh conditions, he finally came across one. Well, what was left of it. The inhabitants of some remote village had captured one and eaten it a couple of days before. But he got to keep the fur.

It was heart breaking and hilarious at the same time.

So - maybe thylacines or some variation thereof are still out there. It is possible as it is one of the most inaccessible areas left on this planet.
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oldroverOffline
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PostPosted: 14-03-2013 11:44    Post subject: Reply with quote

Zilch5 wrote:


So - maybe thylacines or some variation thereof are still out there. It is possible as it is one of the most inaccessible areas left on this planet.


True, if there was any particularly persuasive evidence I'd be pretty optimistic.
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drbatesOffline
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PostPosted: 14-03-2013 20:06    Post subject: Reply with quote

Zilch5 wrote:
The inhabitants of some remote village had captured one and eaten it a couple of days before. .


Inhabitants of remote villages are a complete PITA - they're always doing stuff like this.
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oldroverOffline
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PostPosted: 06-04-2013 19:04    Post subject: Reply with quote

drbates wrote:


Inhabitants of remote villages are a complete PITA - they're always doing stuff like this.


It means pains in the arse. I got that in record time.
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