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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 07-08-2014 07:53    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another reminder:

Post-tropical storm Bertha set to arrive in Plymouth by Sunday afternoon
By Plymouth Herald | Posted: August 07, 2014

The latest forecast puts the weather front being pushed across the Atlantic by post-tropical storm Bertha on the shores of Plymouth at 3pm on Sunday.

The storm, downgraded from a tropical storm, is moving across the Atlantic and bring high winds and heavy rain to Plymouth for the weekend.
The Met Office forecasts heavy showers from tomorrow through the weekend with surf forecast site Magic Seaweed forecasting the biggest swells off the UK coast on Sunday afternoon.

The satellite imagery, updated on Wednesday evening, shows Bertha sitting off the South West coast by Sunday afternoon.
High winds and heavy rain will be pushed ahead of the storm as it combines with a local weather system.

Magicseaweed says: "Attention moves to Europe as Bertha makes her way up the US East Coast, preparing for her voyage back across the Atlantic. While there is still some degree of uncertainty about the conditions after the storm merges with the low pressure system situated over Europe, most models agree with a direct hit for the UK."

http://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/Post-tropical-storm-Bertha-set-arrive-Plymouth/story-22129935-detail/story.html
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PostPosted: 07-08-2014 08:39    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lizard quarry could supply millions of tonnes of rock for Swansea Bay tidal lagoon project
4:30pm Wednesday 6th August 2014

If the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon marine energy project gets the go-ahead then millions of tonnes of armour rock could be quarried and shipped out of Dean Quarry on the Lizard.
Cemex who own Dean quarry closed it down in 2005 with the loss of 15 jobs. Up until then the quarry shipped millions of tonnes of roadstone to south coast ports.
A construction firm is investigating and evaluating a scheme that would see the old steel jetty at Dean quarry demolished and replaced by a 600 metre long breakwater to berth two ships.

The company wants to reopen Dean near St Keverne as early as next year and says it hopes to extract at least 1.5 million tons of material in the first year alone.
Liz Marsden, of Shire Oak Energy Limited, said if it received planning approval, the quarry could be reopened as early as next summer.

The current jetty at Dean which served the quarry for decades was a tidal berth.
Cornwall Council and the Marine Management Organisation will have to be consulted.
In order to berth ships alongside at all states of the tide a much longer jetty is necessary to find the deeper water.
One thing is for sure in a full easterly storm the berth and equipment [will] need to [be] extremely robust to withstand the heavy seas.

The rock will be shipped to south Wales and used to create an enormous breakwater for a tidal lagoon off Swansea. Taking three years to build and using five million tons of rock, it will harness the tides and generate renewable energy.
The total length of the lagoon wall is 10 kilometres and the bund is 9.5 kilometres.

She added that other possible quarries with a licence and the right kind of rock were in the Netherlands or Norway.

Before any work could go ahead, the plans for Dean Quarry would need to secure the approval of the government's Marine Management Organisation and Cornwall Council.
The reopening of the quarry could also be good news for Falmouth, as before its closure in 2005 it was reported to represent about eight per cent of pilotage movements for the towns pilots.

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/cornwall_news/11390490.Lizard_quarry_could_supply_millions_of_tonnes_of_rock_for_Swansea_Bay_tidal_lagoon_project/?ref=mr


The proximity to south Wales could give Dean Quarry the advantage over Dutch or Norwegian sites.

Some pics of the quarry and jetty in 2009 at the head of this page
:
http://cornwalltidesreach.weebly.com/manacle-penlee.html
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 07-08-2014 23:21    Post subject: Reply with quote

0011 Bst: The Falmouth LB is out again, heading at over 24 knots towards the Helford...

0024: has now slowed down, doing 4 kn. past Rose Mullion head.
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PostPosted: 08-08-2014 07:05    Post subject: Reply with quote

Friday am: Just checked the Falmouth LB track for last night. She went past Rosemullion Head and into the Helford river, where she spent a considerable amount of time zigzagging from shore to shore. She finally left the Helford about 0430 BST.

A search of the local media turns up this:
Quote:
Emergency services searching Helford River for missing man
By CG_Oscar | Posted: August 08, 2014

Falmouth Coastguards are coordinating a large-scale search in the Helford River for a swimmer who’s been missing since yesterday evening.

The man – in his 20s – was equipped with a snorkel, a weight belt and was wearing a dry suit when he told his family he was going out alone at 7pm last night. The alarm was raised at around 11.30pm when he failed to return home.

The Falmouth Coastguard Rescue Team, the Coastguard Sector Manager for South Cornwall, both RNLI lifeboats from Falmouth, police officers and the police helicopter have been searching throughout the night.

Peter Bullard, Watch Manager at Falmouth Coastguard, said:

“We have been carrying out a thorough search of the estuary as we try to find this missing swimmer. We have now called in the Porthoustock Coastguard Rescue Team to help, and at daylight we will assign further rescue resources to try to find this man.

“In the meantime, anyone who may have some information about this swimmer that could help in our search should contact Falmouth Coastguard on 01326 317575.”

http://www.westbriton.co.uk/Emergency-services-searching-Helford-River/story-22218230-detail/story.html

More when I get it.

EDIT: The Falmouth Packet now has the story, but it's pretty much word for word the same as the WB version.

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/fpfalmouth/11396900.Air_and_sea_search_for_missing_swimmer/

More questions than answers, it seems. Why go snorkelling alone at that time of the evening? How experienced was he? etc, etc..
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PostPosted: 08-08-2014 08:58    Post subject: Reply with quote

Warnings about Big Bertha continue:

Yellow warning as downpours, large surf and 60mph winds expected on Sunday
1:00pm Thursday 7th August 2014 in News .

Yellow warning as downpours, large surf and 60mph winds expected on Sunday The Met Office is warning of severe weather during Sunday as a depression caused by the after effects of hurricane Bertha tracks over, or close to, Cornwall.

The body says that at this stage there is more than average uncertainty in the forecast, but the public should be aware of the risk of heavy rain, strong winds and large waves, sufficient to disrupt transport and make outdoor activities dangerous.
A spokesman said: "This is a particularly volatile situation, and this warning is likely to be changed as the event approaches.

According to the Met Office chief forecaster, the remains of hurricane Bertha, currently over the western side of the Atlantic this morning, will come steadily towards the UK.

Adding: "The transition from a tropical to an extra-tropical feature is a particularly hard one to forecast with confidence, and computer models continue to differ in the location and intensity of the resulting depression, which is expected to pass over, or close to, the UK from early on Sunday.

"There is the potential for widespread rainfall totals of more than 50 mm and coastal gusts of over 60 mph, along with large waves. However, the system may pass harmlessly to the south of the country. or spread heavy rain even further north, and the public are advised to keep up to date with warnings."

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/11394965.Yellow_warning_as_downpours__large_surf_and_60mph_winds_expected_on_Sunday/?ref=mr
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PostPosted: 08-08-2014 09:14    Post subject: Reply with quote

1008 BST: the Falmouth LB is returning to port after another run down to the Helford. She seems to have set out about 0845, but it's not easy untangling all the tracks now! I hope I'm wrong in thinking that she may have been sent to recover a body...

More later - I have to go out now.
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PostPosted: 08-08-2014 16:11    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ben Morris search: Body of Helford River snorkeller found

The body of a man who went missing while snorkelling in the Helford River has been found after a large-scale search.
The man, who has been named by police as Ben Morris, 24, was spotted by a search and rescue helicopter off Rosemullion Head at about 09:00 BST.
Police said his next of kin had been informed and formal identification would be carried out later.

The alarm was raised when he failed to return home on Thursday night.
Mr Morris was equipped with a weight belt and was wearing a dry suit when he told his family he was going out alone, at about 19:00 BST.

The Helford River stretches from the outer edge of Falmouth Bay up to the old port of Gweek.

Falmouth Coastguard, the RNLI, police officers, the police helicopter and the search and rescue helicopter from RNAS Culdrose were all involved.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-28702266
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PostPosted: 08-08-2014 16:25    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Falmouth Packet has a few more details, but doesn't do the paper's none-too-clever reputation any good by saying, in the headline, "Body found at Roseland Headland..." - the Roseland is a completely different part of Cornwall! It's to the east of Falmouth Harbour! (As the beeb said, it was Rosemullion Head.)

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/fpfalmouth/11396900.Body_found_in_search_for_missing_swimmer__Named_as_local_24_year_old_Ben_Morris/
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PostPosted: 08-08-2014 16:47    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner2 wrote:
A story of a pleasure boat sinking between Falmouth and Fowey in 1966. The story made the national news, partly because the Search and Rescue response was seen as inadequate.

Look Back In Time: Tragic sinking of day trip boat Darlwyne with loss of 31 lives
1:00pm Sunday 6th July 2014

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/11315152.Look_Back_In_Time__Tragic_sinking_of_day_trip_boat_Darlwyne_with_loss_of_31_lives/?ref=mr

A follow-up piece:

Falmouth RNLI man's memories of Mylor pleasure boat tragedy that cost 31 lives
3:30pm Thursday 7th August 2014

This week marks another anniversary of the sinking of the pleasure boat Darlwyne in July 1966, when 31 men, women and children lost their lives off Dodman Point during adverse weather conditions when a return boat trip from Mylor to Fowey turned into tragedy.

The Darlwyne skippered by Brian Bown had left Fowey heading for Falmouth with a southwesterly gale forecast and was never seen again.
Despite a week long massive air and sea search only the Darlwyne's dinghy was found and a total of 12 bodies.

For one man in the port it will once again rekindle memories of the tragedy that shook the entire nation. The only surviving crew member of the Falmouth lifeboat crew that searched for bodies after the Darlwyne sank is the Packet's shipping correspondent David Barnicoat.
David, who lives in Mawnan Smith, recently met up with author Martin Banks in Mylor where he was promoting his book The Mysterious Loss of the Darlwyne.

At the age of 18, David was a crew member onboard the lifeboat Crawford and Constance Coneybeare on August 4, 1966 when RAF planes spotted bodies in the water east of Dodman Point.
David said: “It was day that will be etched in my mind forever. We launched on service at seven in the morning and headed for Dodman Point with Coxswain Bertram West in command.”

He recalled the recovery operation. “A Royal Navy helicopter from RNAS Culdrose hovered quite low alongside the lifeboat with the pilot pointing in the direction of a body.
“We recovered the bodies of two young girls. At the time we did not know that one of them was 17-year-old Amanda Jane Hicks from Mylor. Her nine-year-old brother Joel was never found.

“The other girl was 14-year-old Susan Tassell, who died along with her mother, father and two sisters on the Darlwyne. Later we went alongside the Fowey lifeboat, which transferred the body of 50-year-old Albert Russell to us.”

On the way back to Falmouth David said the mood on the lifeboat was sombre.
“As we rounded St Anthony's lighthouse Bertram West asked us to stand to attention at various stations around the lifeboat. In the harbour the Royal Yacht Britannia anchored off St Mawes had been dressed overall to mark the Queen Mother's birthday.
“As we steamed past Britannia only her White Ensign was now visible. It was dipped when we were abeam of the Royal Yacht and officers saluted the lifeboat from the bridge,” said David.

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/11394578.Falmouth_RNLI_man_s_memories_of_Mylor_pleasure_boat_tragedy_that_cost_31_lives/?ref=mr
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PostPosted: 09-08-2014 07:18    Post subject: Reply with quote

With Bertha expected tomorrow, it's time to keep a check on the Wx forecast.

There are 11 gale warnings in the North Sea, but that's 'old' weather. There are a further 6 gale warnings in the SW - these mark the advent of Bertha.


The general synopsis at midnight

Low Humber 1000 expected Viking 983 by midnight tonight. Low north Rockall 996 expected Bailey 994 by same time.
Low 450 miles west of Fitzroy 1004 [Bertha] expected east Sole 998 by that time

Issued 9 August 04:05 UTC

http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/coast_and_sea/shipping_forecast
(Use this link anytime for the latest Wx Fx.)

Sea areas Plymouth and Lundy include the first UK coasts to experience the new blow:

Plymouth
Gale Warning: Gale warning issued 9 August 03:29 UTC
Southerly gale force 8 expected later


Wind Variable 4 becoming southerly or southwesterly 5 to 7, occasionally gale 8 later.
Sea State Slight or moderate, becoming moderate or rough later.
Weather Showers, rain later.
Visibility Good, occasionally poor.

Lundy
Gale Warning: Gale warning issued 9 August 03:29 UTC

Northwesterly gale force 8 expected later

Wind West 4 or 5, becoming cyclonic 6 to gale 8 later, perhaps severe gale 9 later.
Sea State Slight or moderate, becoming moderate or rough later.
Weather Rain or showers.
Visibility Good, occasionally poor.
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PostPosted: 09-08-2014 07:27    Post subject: Reply with quote

Who owns the Arctic Ocean? Nobody - yet.

Canada launches mission to map Arctic seabed

Canada has launched a mission to map the Arctic seabed to support its bid to extend its territory up to the North Pole.
The six-week mission comes in the face of competing claims from other countries, including Russia.

Two ice-breakers are setting out from Newfoundland to collect data from an undersea ridge that starts near Ellesmere Island and runs to the Pole.
The region is believed to include large oil and gas reserves.

Last December Canada filed an application with the UN seeking to vastly expand its Atlantic sea boundary.
Russia and Denmark have also made competing claims on a vast area of Arctic seabed around the Lomonosov Ridge.
[MAP:]
All three countries are seeking scientific proof that the ridge is an underwater extension of their continental shelf.
The area is estimated to hold 13% of the world's undiscovered oil and up to 30% of its hidden natural gas reserves.

A Canadian government statement said the first icebreaker had left St John's, Newfoundland, on Friday and the second would depart on Saturday.
"Our government is securing our sovereignty while expanding our economic and scientific opportunities by defining Canada's last frontier," said Environment Minister Leona Aglukkaq.
"This is important to Canadians, especially those in the north, as this is their future and prosperity at stake."

Under the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea, a coastal nation can claim exclusive economic rights to natural resources on or beneath the sea floor up to 200 nautical miles (370km) beyond their land territory.

But if the continental shelf extends beyond that distance, the country must provide evidence to a UN commission which will then make recommendations about establishing an outer limit.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-28718806
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PostPosted: 09-08-2014 07:40    Post subject: Reply with quote

From the Arctic future to the Antarctic past:

Sir Ernest Shackleton's Antarctica mission launch re-enacted

The start of the voyage was re-enacted by a tall ship, the Phoenix
The start of a mission from Plymouth to Antarctica has been re-enacted 100 years on.

The original expedition, led by Sir Ernest Shackleton, hoped to make the first land crossing of the Antarctic continent.
It failed in that, but it is remembered as a feat of navigation and endurance when Sir Ernest rescued all 27 of his crew and bought them home.

The Shackleton 100 events also included the unveiling of two plaques.
Paul Davies, from the Devon and Cornwall Polar Society, said: "This event will be the first of a series of Shackleton 100 events over the next two years, culminating in a national service of thanksgiving in 2016 at Westminster Abbey.

"The story of their rescue under Shackleton's leadership is truly inspirational.
"Several of the men had strong links to Plymouth and it is right that the city is commemorating its part in this famous expedition.
"

After leaving Plymouth and sailing to the Atlantic early in 1915, Endurance became trapped in the Antarctic ice and sank 10 months later.
Shackleton's crew had already abandoned the ship to live on the floating ice.
In April 1916 they set off in three small boats, eventually reaching Elephant Island.

Taking five crew members, Shackleton then went to find help and the six men spent 16 days crossing 1,300km (810 miles) of ocean to reach South Georgia.
They trekked across the mountainous island of South Georgia to a whaling station to get help.

The remaining men from the Endurance were rescued in August 1916. There were no fatalities.

Sir Ernest's granddaughter, the Hon Alexandra Shackleton, unveiled two plaques in Plymouth to commemorate the occasion, the first at the Duke of Cornwall Hotel, and the second at Clyde Quay in Millbay, where the Endurance set sail 100 years ago.
The start of the voyage was commemorated by the tall ship, the Phoenix, which is visiting the city.

A replica of the open boat in which Sir Ernest embarked on his rescue mission was also in Plymouth.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-28702267
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PostPosted: 10-08-2014 08:39    Post subject: Reply with quote

The weather is pretty hairy all over - only five sea areas do not have Gale Warnings.

The general synopsis at midnight

Complex low Fitzroy 997 and Fastnet 996 expected single centre Dogger 977 by midnight tonight.
Low Viking 983 moving away steadily northwards

Issued 10 August 04:05 UTC

http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/coast_and_sea/shipping_forecast

It's still breezy here, but most of the rain seems to have gone through. We had blue skies at 0630 BST!
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PostPosted: 10-08-2014 18:17    Post subject: Reply with quote

Venice cruise ship ban to go ahead as planned
10 August 2014 Last updated at 00:17 BST

Italy is going ahead with plans to ban large cruise ships from the centre of Venice to protect the medieval floating city from potential damage.
The government has commissioned an environmental study for an alternative route, which would still satisfy the tourist industry, the lifeblood of Venice.

Video: Janey Mitchell reports.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-28728841

Probably a good idea. Some of them seem bigger than the city itself, and the water they displace could affect the city's foundations. Costa Concordia has not helped the cause of cruise ships either.
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PostPosted: 11-08-2014 21:46    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ten injured as Strangford Lough regatta hit by storm

Ten people have been injured during an international boating event on Strangford Lough in County Down.
A major rescue effort got under way after 87 sailing dinghies were hit by a sudden squall.

Initial reports suggested up to 100 people, including children, were in the water. However, the coastguard has since confirmed that 20 went overboard.
Everyone has now been rescued. A major incident was declared at a nearby hospital but has since been stood down
.
A spokesperson for the Ulster Hospital in Dundonald said two people had been taken to the hospital with minor injuries.

The injured were treated by the Northern Ireland Ambulance Service, which set up tents at the scene. Most of those being treated showed signs of hypothermia.

Liam Colquhoun, watch manager at Belfast Coastguard, confirmed the search and rescue operation had been a success and was called off within three hours.
"We have now been told by our rescue units on scene that everyone has safely returned to shore and that no one is missing," he said.
"We believe 20 people ended up in the water after their boats capsized this afternoon, 10 of them requiring medical attention.
"The weather conditions on scene have been pretty treacherous, with winds gusting up to 60mph. We're very thankful that everyone has now safely returned."

A GP14 world championship event was being held on the lough near Killyleagh.
A spokesperson for the event said the first race had been due to take place at 11:55 BST on Monday but it had been cancelled due to bad weather.
Competitors were on their way back to shore when the incident happened.
It is not known how many children were involved, but they are thought to be aged between 13 and 18.

Ian Dobson, a world champion dinghy and yacht racer, who was taking part in the event, praised "the well executed response and safety procedure deployed by the organisers".

The Bangor and Portaferry Coastguard rescue teams, the Portaferry and Newcastle RNLI lifeboats, the Irish Coast Guard helicopter along with the helicopter from RAF Valley are helping in the rescue effort.

The GP14 world championship event sees one of the biggest fleets of single class twin crew dinghies assemble in Northern Ireland.
With an international following the event attracted about 200 competitors, some from as far away as Australia.
Hosted by East Down Yacht Club, which is a few miles outside Killyleagh, races are held daily over the week-long event.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-28745787

"Twin crew dinghies" - I suppose that "Two man dinghies" is now politically incorrect! Rolling Eyes

The GP14 is quite an old class, designed in 1949, and quite heavy by modern standards.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GP14_(dinghy)

Strangford Lough is an interesting place - in the long and narrow entrance channel from the Irish Sea a tidal whirlpool is created on both ebb and flood tides. It's off to the side of the channel, so not particularly dangerous.
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