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The Lone Coastguard!
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 12-08-2014 09:18    Post subject: Reply with quote

The south coast ferries have been having a 'rough' old time of it recently - their woes continue:

'Voyage from hell' leaves three hurt and 41 cars damaged
Three crew members were injured and 41 cars damaged during strong winds on a ferry crossing from Weymouth to Jersey.
The Condor Vitesse sailing had departed Weymouth at about 13:00 BST on Sunday afternoon.
One passenger described the sailing as "the voyage from hell".

Captain Fran Collins, from Condor Ferries, said wave heights had stayed within safe limits throughout the journey.
However, she said unexpectedly high waves around the Casquets Lighthouse caused problems despite the boat slowing down.

Adam Spur, who was on the crossing, said many passengers were sick.
"The boat was going side-to-side quite a lot and crashing into waves," he said.
"I would say out of the passengers on the journey, about 80% were falling ill.
"We could hear bits-and-pieces in duty free falling about and smashing... and from what I understand, pretty much every car on board had gone into the car next to it."

Condor said it was working with passengers whose cars were damaged to help resolve their claims.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-jersey-28746723

Edit to add: Casquets Lighthouse is NW of Alderney, where the tides run strongly. Wind-against-tide there can be nasty.

The Vitesse suffered an engine break-down last year
:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-23911054
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PostPosted: 12-08-2014 10:06    Post subject: Reply with quote

Solent yachtsman dies in boom accident

A crew member on board a yacht in the Solent has died after apparently being struck on the head by the vessel's boom.
Solent Coastguard received a mayday call from the yacht off Gurnard Ledge, shortly before 13:00 BST.
A paramedic was winched on board from the coastguard helicopter but the man was declared dead at the scene.

Police said it was not being treated as suspicious and the Marine Accident Investigation Branch had been informed.
The RNLI's Cowes Atlantic 85 lifeboat was also called to the incident.
An RNLI spokesman said the Southampton-based yacht had been on its way to Yarmouth but diverted to Cowes due to strong south-westerly winds at the time.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-28745418

The photos indicate the wind strength. The sails are not set, but they are all roller furling, so could have been quickly stowed away before the helicopter arrived.

The usual cause of this kind of accident is an accidental gybe: sailing downwind the mainsail will be squared out to one side, but if the wind gets behind the sail it can suddenly crash across to the other side.
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PostPosted: 12-08-2014 21:13    Post subject: Reply with quote

A good Coast tonight.
Quote:
Coast explores surprising stories that connect our great cities to the sea.

Nick Crane pays tribute to the unsung and astonishing mega-port of Immingham, a city-sized enterprise dedicated to global trade and the biggest seaport in the UK, in terms of the weight of goods it handles.

Tessa Dunlop uncovers the astonishing story of how Hitler's bombers could have drowned London, and possibly won the Second World War, by destroying the embankments that contain the River Thames.

Ruth Goodman investigates the clandestine coastal sex trade that scandalised Victorian Britain. In the mid-19th century the Royal Navy was in crisis as sailors fell prey to sexually-transmitted diseases. The government brought in draconian laws to detain and forcibly treat women suspected of being prostitutes.

Mark Horton reveals how solving the greatest scientific puzzle of the 18th century, determining a ship's exact position at sea, meant Greenwich became the epicentre of global sea navigation.

I've been to Immingham (I think) but it seems to have grown even more since then. And Nick Crane got to drive a crane! Very Happy

Some ghastly Victorian photos of the effects of STD may put you off your supper, however.

Should be on iPlayer soon.
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PostPosted: 13-08-2014 08:15    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mystery light sparks Seaton rescue alert
Chris Carson
Wednesday, August 13, 2014 8:19 AM

Emergency services scrambled after fears that people might be trapped by the tide
A fisherman sparked a rescue alert off Seaton last night (Tuesday, August 12).

Coastguards were scrambled and the Sidmouth lifeboat launched [after] a member of the public called police to report a flashing light on the shoreline west of the resort.
There was concern that this may be a person cut off by the exceptionally high tide.

Sidmouth Lifeboat put to sea and Beer Coastguard Rescue Officers met with the first informant on scene. Eventually, a local fisherman was located who confirmed that he had been using a light in that area.

Rolling Eyes

http://www.devon24.co.uk/news/mystery_light_sparks_seaton_rescue_alert_1_3724211

But better a false alarm than a tragedy.
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PostPosted: 13-08-2014 09:31    Post subject: Reply with quote

Vice-president of Falmouth and Penryn sea cadets pulled from sea was not wearing lifejacket
9:00am Wednesday 13th August 2014

The vice-president of Falmouth and Penryn Sea Cadets was pulled from the Penryn River after his boat overturned on Monday.
Robert Hichens was one of three people who had to be recovered from the water on Monday after the punt they were in capsized. They were not wearing lifejackets.

Falmouth Inshore Lifeboat was launched at around 4.45pm to reports of people in the water after their boat had capsized off Little Flushing, arriving on scene a few minutes later.

An RNLI spokesperson said: “It was found that the three people involved had already been recovered by a passing boat and once it was confirmed that no medical attention was required they were taken ashore by the boat while the inshore lifeboat sorted out the punt and towed it ashore.

“The three occupants had been heading out to their moored yacht when the 8ft punt they were in capsized throwing them into the water. None of them was wearing a lifejacket but luckily a passing rigid inflatable saw their plight and was able to recover them quickly from the water.”

Mr Hichens was unavailable for comment at the time of going to press, as he was sailing and his mobile phone was reported to be water damaged.

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/fpfalmouth/11404653.Vice_president_of_Falmouth_and_Penryn_sea_cadets_pulled_from_sea_was_not_wearing_lifejacket/

There's something interesting about this story.
Robert Hichens was a local war hero (with a street in Falmouth named after him).

Quote:
Lieutenant Commander Robert Peverell Hichens DSO & Bar, DSC & Two Bars, RNVR (2 March 1909 – 13 April 1943) was the most highly decorated officer of the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve (RNVR)...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Peverell_Hichens

He was a keen and talented sailor (which I didn't know before!), which enabled him to get his wartime RNVR commission.

The Robert Hichens in the Packet story is indeed the vice-president of Falmouth and Penryn Sea Cadets, according to their website. It seems likely that, given his nautical interests, this RH is related to the war hero - presumably the family still live locally.

But (and here's the Fortean bit!) Wiki has another Robert Hichens, also connected to a big sea story
:
Quote:
Robert Hichens (16 September 1882 – 23 September 1940) was a British sailor who was part of the deck crew on board the RMS Titanic when she sank on her maiden voyage on 15 April 1912. He was one of six quartermasters on board the vessel and was at the ship's wheel when the Titanic struck the iceberg. Shocked

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Hichens_(sailor)


Wiki has a third Robert Hichens, who doesn't seem to have any nautical connections...
Quote:
Robert Hichens (Robert Smythe Hichens, 14 November 1864 – 20 July 1950) was an English journalist, novelist, music lyricist, short story writer, music critic and collaborated on successful plays.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Hichens_(author)

...until I find this:

"Hichens first novel, The Coastguard's Secret (1886), was written when he was only seventeen." Shocked

I wonder if the local library has that one! Wink
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 13-08-2014 22:30    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've found a great place for a new Lone CG HQ!

The trouble is, I don't know quite where it is!


Disused fort on River Thames up for sale
[Video]
A seven-bedroom mansion, with sea views and in commuting distance of central London, is on the market for £500,000.
This might sound like a bargain, but there are a few drawbacks.
You can only get to No 1 The Thames when the tide is low or if you have a boat as it is situated in the Thames Estuary.

BBC London's Gareth Furby took a tour with estate agent Nigel Day and spoke to its current owner Simon Cooper, from Eltham, south-east London.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-28776184

There are several clues in the video, and the best guess I can come up with is it's off the coast of the Isle of Sheppey (Kent). I have some old charts of the area, but the corners are torn off so they cannot be sold as new, so possibly the crucial info I need is missing!

The original name for the fort was certainly not No 1 The Thames! (Some of the Thames forts had quite fascinating names - I may do some research shortly.)

Meantime, anyone have any local knowledge of this place?
An old fort in the Thames would be a good base for a Fortean CG!

(The only other snag is, I need to find about half a million quid...)
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PostPosted: 14-08-2014 09:08    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alan Johnson MP backs Hull HMS Illustrious carrier plan

Plans to turn the Royal Navy aircraft carrier HMS Illustrious into a tourist attraction in Hull have been backed by MP Alan Johnson.
The proposal would see the carrier docked next to aquarium The Deep, for Hull's City of Culture celebrations in 2017.

The 20,000-tonne carrier is due to be retired, after 32 years of service.
Mr Johnson, the Hull West Labour MP, said there was a "pressing need" to secure the future of the vessel.

As part of the plans, the 700ft long (215m) ship would be based on the River Tyne, at the former Holburn Dock, for the "next two years" before berthing in Hull for two years, from 2017.
A statement on the MP's website said if the plans were a success, HMS Illustrious would be available as an "immersive, inspiring and exciting visitor experience" during 2017 and 2018.

A Ministry of Defence spokesperson said: "HMS Illustrious has a long and proud history with the Royal Navy.
"During her 32 years of service she has protected our nation's interests in the Falklands, Bosnia, Iraq, Sierra Leone and most recently the Philippines."

The ministry was considering bids to re-home HMS Illustrious and preserve the carrier as a "lasting tribute" to the personnel who served on all three of the Invincible-class aircraft carriers, introduced in the 1980s, the spokesperson added.
It is a condition of sale that HMS Illustrious must remain in the UK, the ministry said.

Last month, the ship returned to its home port in Portsmouth for the final time.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-humber-28774193
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PostPosted: 14-08-2014 10:49    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rig-carrying ship that sinks itself to return to Falmouth
Updated 10:26am Thursday 14th August 2014

The large semi-submersible heavy lift vessel Black Marlin (58,000 tons) is expected in Falmouth Bay on Saturday morning for bunkers after a two month long voyage from Shanghai via the Cape of Good Hope.
The Black Marlin is carrying a brand new state-of-the art jack up rig called Prospector 5, which she will float off in Cromarty for Prospector Offshore. Drilling.

Readers may recall when the Black Marlin arrived here from West Africa in 2001 carrying the oil rig Sovereign Explorer. The plan was to float off the rig in Carrick Roads but bad weather meant the ship had to be taken out of the harbour into the bay at the last minute for the float off.

The legs on the Prospector 5 rig will tower 550 feet above the deck of Black Marlin.
The rig is capable of operating in nominal water depths of up to 400 feet and is equipped to drill wells to a depth of 35,000 feet in high pressure and high temperature environments.

Dockwise a Dutch company operating the Black Marlin is acknowledged as a leading specialist in heavy transport shipping owning 21 semi-submersible heavy transport vessels.
These vessels arrive on location, take on water ballast, and sink down to their operating draught. Then the cargo is either floated off or floated on leaving the vessel to de-ballast (discharge water ballast).

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/11406211.Rig_carrying_ship_that_sinks_itself_to_return_to_Falmouth/?ref=mr

There was another of these ships (called Treasure) in Falmouth Bay a week ago. And talking about Ballast water:

Japanese shrimp finds its way to Falmouth waters after hitching a ride
5:30pm Saturday 16th August 2014

Anyone looking for a fun summer holiday activity should head down to the Falmouth coastline for a spot of rock-pooling following an influx of foreign shrimps.

Joy Thomas, formerly of Penryn now living at Stithians, contacted the Packet to say she had found a “blood red” shrimp with her grandchildren while on Brean Beach between Helford and Maenporth.

Around one and quarter inches long, the Japanese Skeleton Shrimp, or Caprella Mutica to give its proper name, has a straight back rather than curved like a British shrimp.

After contacting Falmouth Harbour Commissioners she discovered the organisation is logging the findings of this shrimp, which had found its way to UK waters.

Native to the subarctic regions of the Sea of Japan in northwestern Asia, they are thought to have spread into other parts of the world through accidental introductions from the hulls or ballast water of international maritime traffic, aquaculture equipment, and shipments of the Pacific oyster.

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/11406945.Japanese_shrimp_finds_its_way_to_Falmouth_waters_after_hitching_a_ride/?ref=mr
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PostPosted: 14-08-2014 14:04    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cables laid across River Fal to bring superfast broadband to Roseland
1:00pm Monday 11th August 2014

The Roseland Peninsula is being hooked up to superfast broadband thanks to cable being laid across the bed of the River Fal.
Engineers from BT’s Openreach have installed two new underwater fibre optic cables across the River Fal, which will give an additional 500 Roseland homes and businesses access to the high-speed fibre technology by the end of the year. It will take fibre broadband coverage on the peninsula from the current 78 per cent of premises to about 95 per cent.

The job posed a number of challenges because of the way the bed of the River Fal shelves very steeply and the river’s importance to shipping.

The investment is part of the £132 million Superfast Cornwall initiative between the European Regional Development Fund, BT and Cornwall Council, which plans to make fibre broadband available to 95 per cent of homes and premises on Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly by the end of 2014.
Nigel Ashcroft, Superfast Cornwall programme director for Cornwall Development Company said: “Only a few weeks ago Superfast Cornwall made national and international headlines with its pioneering plan to bring superfast broadband to the Isles of Scilly. It was a very exciting announcement, but we should not forget that the partnership is also working very hard to make this exciting technology as widely available as possible on the UK mainland. The work being undertaken across the River Fal and on the Roseland Peninsula is a good example of that commitment. It means that Roseland will be among the best connected rural areas in the UK.”

Ranulf Scarbrough, Superfast Cornwall programme director for BT, said: “Whether it is trialling new technology or carrying out important engineering projects, such as installing these cables across the River Fal, Superfast Cornwall continues to set the pace for superfast broadband partnerships across Europe. This was a complex engineering operation, partly because we had to lay the cables across an underwater cliff in the River Fal, in which the depth suddenly increases from about four metres to 30 metres. The two new cables will ensure that we have the capacity to meet the needs of households and businesses on Roseland for many years to come.”

Among the next businesses to get superfast broadband will be the King Harry Ferry company, which operates on the River Fal and celebrates its 125th anniversary on September 19. The King Harry Ferry and its sister company Cornwall Ferries Ltd, which runs 11 passenger ferries, carry about two million passengers and 300,000 vehicles a year.

Tim Light, the managing director, said: “This is an exciting time for us. The arrival of superfast broadband will be an important milestone for our ferry services, which have been operating in some form on the River Fal for about 500 years.

“We can see many opportunities. It will help tremendously with our plans to run a Smartcard-type system for integrated travel around the River Fal because such a system requires a great deal of data to be passed between the bus, train and ferry services. It should also be a boost for our on-line ticket sales, our wi-fi hotspots and the part of our company, which provides marketing services for about 360 firms and organisations in St Mawes, Truro and Roseland.”


http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/11400893.Cables_laid_across_River_Fal_to_bring_superfast_broadband_to_Roseland/?ref=ms

The first photo shows the King Harry Ferry on the left, approaching the Roseland shore. This is the only place on the river with road access either side.

The second photo shows one of the MTS fleet (I think Grey Bear) acting as Cable Layer.
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PostPosted: 15-08-2014 07:55    Post subject: Reply with quote

Chesil Beach hand grenade detonated by bomb disposal team

An unexploded hand grenade has been found on Chesil Beach in Dorset.
Portland Coastguard said a member of the public found the "rusty old grenade" on the seaward side of the beach by Wyke Regis.

Coastguards contacted the Army about the grenade, which still had the pin attached.
The area was cordoned off and a bomb disposal team carried out a controlled detonation, which was done by 20:00 BST.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-dorset-28796885
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PostPosted: 15-08-2014 13:09    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hastings cliff fall dog rescued after 26 hours

A labradoodle called Pepper who fell over cliffs in East Sussex resisted rescue attempts by Coastguard teams for more than 26 hours.
The dog slipped over the edge while she was off the lead at Ecclesbourne Glen, near Hastings on Wednesday afternoon.
Rescue teams from Hastings and Rye Bay finally managed to persuade her to come close enough to be rescued at 17:30 BST on Thursday.
Pepper was hoisted to the cliff top unhurt but thirsty and exhausted.

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency said the maritime rescue co-ordination centre at Dover (MRCC) was alerted by Sussex Police when the dog fell off the cliff.

MRCC teams located her on a narrow ridge and spent four hours trying to persuade her to come to them but she refused.
They then approached from the other end of the ridge and tried to tempt her with dog treats and meat, but had to call off the rescue attempt in darkness at 23:00 BST.

It resumed on Thursday morning and it took all day before Pepper would move to a position where she could be rescued.
Her owner, from London, said: "I never thought that she would run through the gorse and no idea that there was a sheer cliff on the other side of it.
"I will never again walk Pepper off the lead near a cliff and would strongly advise other dog owners to learn from our experience."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-sussex-28799651
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PostPosted: 15-08-2014 13:52    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Disused fort on River Thames up for sale

There are several clues in the video, and the best guess I can come up with is it's off the coast of the Isle of Sheppey (Kent). I have some old charts of the area, but the corners are torn off so they cannot be sold as new, so possibly the crucial info I need is missing



You were pretty close. According to today's Guardian it's just off the Isle of Grain so slightly north of Sheppey.
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PostPosted: 15-08-2014 16:20    Post subject: Reply with quote

hunck wrote:
Quote:
Disused fort on River Thames up for sale

There are several clues in the video, and the best guess I can come up with is it's off the coast of the Isle of Sheppey (Kent). I have some old charts of the area, but the corners are torn off so they cannot be sold as new, so possibly the crucial info I need is missing

You were pretty close. According to today's Guardian it's just off the Isle of Grain so slightly north of Sheppey.

Thanks for that! Now I have found it on the chart - the Grain Tower is off the east coast of the Isle of Grain, right opposite the NW point of the Isle of Sheppey, Garrison Point. It's only a couple of miles (as the gull flies) from Queenborough, on the west Swale.

Years ago I worked with Harry Rayner on his trawler out of Brightlingsea. For a few weeks in winter, we were spratting in the Thames, and at the end of the day put into Queenborough. Went into a local pub where we asked about food. They told us there was a Chinese takeaway, called the Miramar, not far off, and gave Harry the phone number. He rang and ordered food, and we had a couple of pints while we waited.

Back to the fishing - after two or three days we had a hold full of sprats, which we landed at Colchester. We had to leave the boat there because of the tide, and Harry's wife drove us back to B'sea. Next day we sailed for the Thames again.

Next time at Colchester, Harry's wife seemed really grim - she hardly spoke. Later Harry found out the problem, and told me next day. She'd been going through his pockets before doing some laundry, and found a piece of paper... She confonted him angrily: "Who's Miriam?!"

Yep, it was the scribbled note with the name and number of the takeaway! How we laughed!

Very Happy
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PostPosted: 15-08-2014 22:21    Post subject: Reply with quote

Chortle.

I've done a few walks in that area, Thames estuary, Sheppey, and it's an interesting one. It's got a sort of bleak charm, plenty of mud at low tide, old boats left stranded & rotting, small communities of people living on boats in creeks. Quite a few of those forts in the distance. Also a lot of wind turbines in the sea.

Slightly further north, I went to Foulness Island recently which is on the Camber Sands, got talking to a guy who'd just walked part of the broomway which is out on the sand and can only be done at low tide. He said the tide goes out 3 miles there and comes in at walking pace…
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PostPosted: 16-08-2014 07:35    Post subject: Reply with quote

hunck wrote:
I've done a few walks in that area, Thames estuary, Sheppey, and it's an interesting one. It's got a sort of bleak charm, plenty of mud at low tide, old boats left stranded & rotting, small communities of people living on boats in creeks. Quite a few of those forts in the distance. Also a lot of wind turbines in the sea.

I once did quite a bit of sailing in the area, but that was when the only wind turbines were brightly coloured ones, held in the hands of kiddies on the beach! How times change...

Once I was hired to give a man some private sailing tuition on his own boat in the area. Frustratingly, it was flat calm for most of the two or three days I was there, But we made the best of a bad job by circumvavigating Sheppey under outboard as a pilotage exercise one day.

As for the "bleak charm", it's worth reading Dickens' Great Expectations; the Kent marshes are the setting for the early part of the book, and the happenings there define the way the story develops. There have been film and TV adaptations, but I'd love to read a copy of the book by a Kent creekside to absorb the full atmosphere!
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