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The Lone Coastguard!
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 16-08-2014 09:36    Post subject: Reply with quote

Missing child, 5, results in search by emergency services lasting more than an hour
Posted: August 16, 2014
By Joseph Wilkes, digital reporter

A MISSING five-year-old boy resulted in more than an hour’s search by the emergency service teams yesterday.
The child went missing at Woolacombe Bay. The Coastguard, which coordinates its operations from Swansea, received the call at 3.50pm and scrambled the Mortehoe and Croyde coastguard rescue teams.

Woolacombe RNLI lifeguards and officers from Devon and Cornwall Police also helped with the search and the child was found “safe and well and reunited with parents” at 5.07pm, said a spokesman for the coastguard.

The spokesman said the beach was quite busy and children could wander off from parents.
He acknowledged a search of this type was like a needle in a haystack but said it was a matter of getting enough manpower to the area and making a thorough search.

http://www.northdevonjournal.co.uk/Missing-child-5-results-search-emergency-services/story-22756048-detail/story.html

(Croyde was my first CG posting.)
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PostPosted: 16-08-2014 09:51    Post subject: Reply with quote

Paralympian's surprise for disability charity
Updated 9:41am Saturday 16th August 2014
By Maxwell Kusi-Obodum, Senior reporter

PARALYMPIC medallist Ade Adepitan celebrated with crews from a Hampshire disabilities charity scooping a flagship national sports prize.
Members of the Jubilee Sailing Trust (JST) were stunned when the wheelchair basketball star and television presenter declared them winners on a surprise visit on their latest epic voyage.
There were emotional scenes as Ade broke the news that the Woolston-based group had been voted the UK’s Best Sport project in this year’s National Lottery Awards.

The charity, which unites both disabled and able-bodied people for regular sailing trips, received 5,790 votes from the public – more than twice the number of their closest rivals.
They will receive a £2,000 cash prize which will be presented at a star-studded ceremony broadcast on BBC1 next month.

Ade came aboard the tall ship Tenacious at Salt Mead, off the Isle of Wight, as the crew returned from an 11-day trip from the Tall Ships Race in Norway.
He presented captain Darren Naggs and its 43-strong-voyage crew with a coveted trophy.

Ade hailed the charity for its dedicated work and added: “This should be a blueprint for how the country could run.
“These trips are all about equality with able bodied and those with impairments coming together and creating long-lasting memories to improve people’s skills and confidence.
There was an amazing reaction when they found they had won and it just shows how much it means to everyone involved.”
“National Lottery players should be proud their money is helping charities like this.


Joining the crew was wheelchair user Andrew Saunders from Hedge End.
The 20-year-old said his highlight was being winched into the crow’s nest in his chair and added: “It’s been a unique experience, making me feel more independent.
“It’s been hard work but worth it and the donation shows how amazing the charity is.”

Jack Finch, 20, from Romsey, was among the able-bodied members and taking part for his Duke of Edinburgh Award.
He said: “It’s been absolutely amazing. I’ve learned so much and had such an experience meeting different people.”

The charity, established in 1978, has run trips for 38,000 people, including 19,000 disabled sailors and 5,000 wheelchair users.
Captain Naggs thanked voters and said: “We provide equality for everyone and are a microcosm of what we would like to see in society.”
The awards are broadcast on BBC1 at 10.30pm on Friday, September 19.

http://www.dailyecho.co.uk/news/11414428.A_paralympic_surprise_for_sailors/?ref=var_0

More of this kind of thing!
Cool
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PostPosted: 17-08-2014 09:39    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bulgarian national got as far as Hengistbury Head after leaving Christchurch, Coastguards said
Updated 9:57am Sunday 17th August 2014
By Caitlin Marsh .

A MAN was rescued from the sea after attempting to sail to America during a busy day for the coastguard.
The Mudeford RNLI Inshore Lifeboat was launched at 4.17pm yesterday after a 12ft dinghy was spotted to the south of Hengistbury Head with one person on board, after a passing yacht noticed that the dingy’s skipper was seasick.

On arrival, the sailor was reluctant to accept help from the RNLI but was eventually persuaded to be brought back to Christchurch Harbour by the lifeboat, as he did not appear to be displaying ‘proficient sailing’, said Portland Coastguard.

Coastguard rescue officers and Dorset Police were there to meet him at the harbour as he was suffering from the cold, along with the ambulance service, which took him to Bournemouth Hospital for treatment.

It later transpired, said the Coastguard, that the man was a Bulgarian national who had set off with the intention of sailing to the USA. Shocked

What's the Bulgarian for Captain Calamity?
But a busy day indeed
:

Earlier in the day, the Poole RNLI Inshore Lifeboat was tasked to assisted with a capsized catamaran in the water off Sandbanks Beach.
Two people were recovered and were taken ashore before the lifeboat crew following a call made to the emergency services at 2.45pm, before the lifeboat returned to recover the catamaran dinghy, which had suffered a split hull.

Less than two hours later, the Poole RNLI Inshore Lifeboat attended reports of a capsized sailing dinghy and one person in the water in Poole Harbour.
A call was made at 4.15pm, leading to the lifeboat visiting the Wills Cut area of the harbour, where they rescued the person and took them to Baiter Park, before later returning to recover the dinghy.


Four people were reported in the water off Salterns Marina in Poole Harbour leading to the Poole RNLI Inshore Lifeboat visiting the scene.
On arrival, following the call made at 4.27pm, two people were found from a capsized dinghy and two were from a capsized jetski, who were all taken to Baiter Park, where they were met by Poole Coastguards.
The lifeboat returned to recover the dingy and jetski after attending another incident.

The Poole RNLI Inshore Lifeboat was also called to attend two people who were in the water in Poole Harbour following a capsized Hobie Cat.
A call was made at 5.37pm leading to the lifeboat crew rescuing the people and their vessel, which was brought ashore where they were met by Poole Coastguard.


Dorset Police were assisted by the coastguard in the search for a missing 67-year-old man last night who was visiting Sandbanks on a daytrip.
A call was made to Poole Coastguard Rescue Team at 8.05pm to help with an extensive search for the man who had not returned to his coach after a trip out from a residential care home in London.
The man was soon found by police officers in Poole Park. Rolling Eyes

An emergency call was made to Southbourne Coastguard with a report of an unusual vessel secured to a buoy in Christchurch Bay.
The coastguard were alerted at 8.09pm and made a broadcast with a responding vessel able to confirm that the craft was an Atlantic rowing vessel with one person on board, who was remaining for the night to test his equipment.


Swanage Coastguard rescue officers were called to investigate reports of a canoe containing two people from a beach party who were out in dangerous conditions.
The call was made just after 9pm and the coastguard found that two men from the party, which was on Swanage Beach, had been fishing in the canoe. Both men had returned to the beach and did not intend to set off again that night.


http://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk/news/11414882.Man__attempting_to_sail_to_USA__rescued_by_lifeboat/?ref=var_0
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PostPosted: 17-08-2014 09:51    Post subject: Reply with quote

Eight plucked from sea off Needles
By a County Press reporter
Sunday, August 17, 2014

EIGHT people were rescued off the Isle of Wight - cold, but unhurt - after their fishing vessel sank yesterday (Saturday) afternoon.

Yarmouth RNLI and Lymington RNLI lifeboats launched soon after 3pm to a Mayday from the skipper of the boat taking on water in the Needles Channel to the east of the Shingles Bank.

Before the lifeboats arrived the passing yacht Osprey had rescued the eight people who had taken to a liferaft.
Land-based coastguards monitored the rescue from the Needles Coastguard Station.

The 33ft fishing boat, Dulce T, completely sank and the eight people were taken to Keyhaven.

http://www.iwcp.co.uk/news/news/eight-plucked-from-sea-off-needles-63004.aspx

Phew! File under 'Could have been worse' Wink
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PostPosted: 17-08-2014 11:02    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner2 wrote:
Disused fort on River Thames up for sale
[Video]

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-28776184

I've just watched the video again...

The ship seen at the start is entering Sheerness Harbour, the outer reach of the Medway.

The wharves and cranes seen in the distance to the right of some shots are at Garrison Point, Sheerness (NW Sheppey).

The tall chimney is at the Isle of Grain power station, SW of Grain Fort.
What looks like another causeway, S of Grain Fort, is actually the outlet channel from the power station.
The line of pylons seen beyond the water seem to be on Chetney Marshes.

There are also distant views of Southend, on the north shore of the Thames.

But when the estate agent discusses the time taken by speedboat to London, he's actually looking up the Medway, not the Thames! Wink

Most of this detail is on the OS maps, accessible on line via Bing Maps, if you want to explore it for yourselves.

Despite the state of the structure, I still think Grain Fort would be a great place to live! Distant views and wide skies, but also a nearby shipping channel and the docks at Sheerness for regular signs of activity, plus the pulse of the tides, and a varied collection of wildlife, no doubt.

I suggest we have a whip-round and buy it - we could establish a Fortean Hostel on the Fort! Cool

One tiny possible disadvantage is that it's within sight of this wreck:
Quote:
SS Richard Montgomery was an American Liberty ship built during World War II, one of the 2,710 used to carry cargo during the war. The ship was wrecked off the Nore in the Thames Estuary in 1944 with around 1,400 tonnes (1,500 short tons) of explosives on board,[1] which continue to be a hazard to the area.
...
Because of the presence of the large quantity of unexploded ordnance, the ship is monitored by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency and is clearly marked on the relevant Admiralty Charts.
...
According to a BBC news report in 1970,[13] it was determined that if the wreck of Richard Montgomery exploded, it would throw a 1,000-foot-wide (300 m) column of water and debris nearly 10,000 feet (3,000 m) into the air and generate a wave 16 feet (5 m) high. Almost every window in Sheerness (pop. c20,000) would be broken and buildings would be damaged by the blast. Shocked Shocked Shocked
However, news reports in May 2012 (including one by BBC Kent) stated that the wave could be about 4 feet (1 m) high, which although lower than previous estimates would be enough to cause flooding in some coastal settlements.
etc...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Richard_Montgomery

Why worry, be happy! Very Happy
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PostPosted: 17-08-2014 17:10    Post subject: Reply with quote

So, no-one wants to chip in to buy the Fort?

I've been thinking about the SS Richard Montgomery - we could use that as a bargaining point to get the price down.

But then, when the Hostel's up and running, we turn the Montgomery into a feature, modelled on the Restaurant at the End of the Universe! Cool

(The east facing windows would make it a great breakfast room too!)

And if they do decide to build an estuary airport, and have to buy us out, we could make a handsome profit on that too! Smile

Well, that's my plan so far! Wink
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PostPosted: 17-08-2014 20:24    Post subject: Reply with quote

Back to serious stuff:

Man dies after falling into the sea at Fanad Head, County Donegal

A man from Northern Ireland has died after he fell from a cliff into the sea in County Donegal.
It happened close to Fanad Head lighthouse at 15:00 BST on Sunday.

The Irish Coast Guard received a 999 call reporting that a man had fallen into the water and they alerted a number of rescue services.
The man was recovered from the sea and received first aid at the scene. He was then airlifted to Letterkenny Hospital, but was later pronounced dead.

Ian Scott, station officer at Malin Head Coast Guard in County Donegal, said it was not yet clear what part of Northern Ireland the man was from.

Mr Scott said Irish Coast Guard staff made an emergency broadcast on receipt of the 999 call and a local boat that was in the area responded and went to the man's aid.
"We also tasked our coast guard helicopter from Sligo, both Lough Swilly lifeboats and also our fast response coast guard team from Mulroy."

The station officer added: "All the search and rescue units arrived on the scene and our coast guard team from Mulroy managed to recover the man from the water, they administered CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation).
"He was then transferred to the coast guard helicopter and flown to Letterkenny Hospital."

The man's name has not yet been released.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-28827676

Not a part of the coast I know. It took me a while to find it on the maps.
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PostPosted: 17-08-2014 20:48    Post subject: Reply with quote

A happier outcome here:

Boy, 4, rescued after fall into Prince of Wales dock, Swansea

A four-year-old boy was rescued from a Swansea dock after a man who was eating at a nearby restaurant saw him fall in.
The youngster tumbled about 6ft (1.8m) into the Old Prince of Wales dock at around 17:00 BST on Saturday.
A 50-year-old local man jumped in to save the boy before paramedics took the youngster to Swansea's Morriston Hospital for checks.

Swansea coastguard said he apparently wandered away from his mother while she was feeding a one-year-old child.
A spokesman said: "She noticed the child was gone just as she heard the sound of splashing and people in the water."

Mumbles coastguard rescue team volunteer Mark James said the rescuer had been at the nearby Beefeater restaurant with his family.
He said: "I don't think he even took his shoes off."
Mr James said a teenager also jumped in to help bring the boy back up the ladder on the side of the dock.
He added the four-year-old "did not appear to be any the worse for his ordeal".

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-28828006

Reminds me of when my son was about four. My wife and kids came to visit me on the river Orwell. My boat was alongside a pontoon, held off by big fenders. Suddenly David ran ahead, and fell into the gap between the pontoon and boat! Shocked

Luckily my wife reacted quickly, and hoiked him out of the water as soon as he surfaced!

All was well, but it could so easily have gone bad if he'd resurfaced under the pontoon, or the tide had carried him away....
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PostPosted: 18-08-2014 07:12    Post subject: Reply with quote

Zeebrugge disaster: Seaford's Jane Hind tells of family loss

A woman who lost her mother, sister and uncle in the Zeebrugge ferry disaster of 1987 has spoken publicly about her grief for the first time.

...

In 1989, the UK's Marine Accident Investigation Branch was formed as a direct result of the disaster. The Zeebrugge trial also paved the way for the Corporate Manslaughter Act, which came into force in 2008.

...

Author Iain Yardley, who has recently published Ninety Seconds at Zeebrugge, said he wanted to bring all the stories from the disaster together.

He said Ms Hind's story had been particularly poignant.
"It was her most private thoughts about the people she loved most in the world," she said.
"She was thrown into extraordinary circumstances...She had to cope with a lot. She lost her mother, her uncle, her sister. She didn't really know what had happened to them on board. And it's a kind of guessing game as to what did happen."

Mr Yardley said many people who were involved in the disaster had managed to move on with their lives and had been strengthened by their experiences.
"I have real admiration for them. I don't know how I would have coped personally," he said.

...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-28785434

I've mentioned before that I several times sailed past Zeebrugge, and saw the capsized ship there.
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PostPosted: 18-08-2014 08:09    Post subject: Reply with quote

More on the Bulgarian Captain Calamity:

Dorset dinghy sailor rescued after trying to sail to US
[Video: The sailor was dragged on to an RNLI lifeboat and rushed back to shore for treatment.]

A sailor was rescued three miles off the coast of Dorset after trying to sail to the US in a 14ft (4.3m) dinghy.
The Bulgarian national had set out from Christchurch Harbour on Saturday when a passing yachtsman saw he looked seasick as he ventured into choppy seas.
Initially, the man refused help, but was eventually dragged on to an RNLI lifeboat and brought to shore.

The RNLI said the man, whose only navigational aid was a street map of Southampton, faced certain death.

Pete Dadds, lifeboat crewman, said the man spoke in broken English and told them he had bought the dinghy earlier in the day.
It was not clear why he was trying to cross the Atlantic but he did have a US visa among his belongings.

Mr Dadds said: "He was very stubborn, he kept saying 'no, no, I'm OK, I want to carry on'.
"He was taking on a lot of water - he was sodden. We said to him 'if you stay out here you will die'.
"It was an absolute mess. He was violently sick overboard and his temperature started dropping so we got him back. I was cuddling him trying to keep him warm."

Once on shore, the man was taken to hospital suffering from the effects of the cold.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-dorset-28825749
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PostPosted: 18-08-2014 08:51    Post subject: Reply with quote

Biggest tall ship pulls out of regatta after sinking tug in Denmark
9:00am Monday 18th August 2014

The Russian four-masted barque Kruzenshtern has been forced to pull out of the Falmouth Tall Ships Regatta after it was involved in the sinking of a tug in the Danish port of Esbjerg last week.

Organisers of the regatta confirmed yesterday that they had been officially informed that the Kruzenshtern will not take part in the Falmouth-Royal Greenwich Tall Ships Regatta. One of biggest tall ships in the world, she would have been moored alongside at Falmouth Docks and open to the public over three days.

It was August 4 when the tug Diver Master took on water and sank near Fano Island while, along with a second tug Svitzer Helios, it was helping Kruzenshtern leave the harbour. The tugs had been attached to the tall ship via hawsers, but when released one attached to Diver Master became stuck and pulled it towards the bigger ship. This caused water to flood the tug which led to it capsizing and subsequently sinking in ten metres of water.

Two of the tug’s crew were rescued by the water police and third jumped into the water and had a line thrown to him.

Kruzenshtern was permitted to continue its journey to Germany, but an investigation into the sinking has been launched by authorities.

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/11410363.Biggest_tall_ship_pulls_out_of_regatta_after_sinking_tug_in_Denmark/?ref=ec

It must be a long time since I last heard of a tug sinking like that. I guess it was towed backwards, and water flooded in over the stern. (Tugs always have a low stern to avoid snagging the hawser, so something else must have impeded its release.)
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PostPosted: 18-08-2014 22:25    Post subject: Reply with quote

More on the Swansea docks rescue:

Swansea Marina rescue dad feared he would die saving boy, 4

A passerby who saved a four-year-old boy from drowning said he feared they would die in the rescue.
Mark Hopkins, 50, from Port Tennant, jumped fully clothed into the Old Prince of Wales dock, Swansea Marina, when the child plunged 6ft (1.8m) into the freezing water.

He said the terrified boy pulled him under the water three or four times, and the temperature sapped his energy.
Fortunately, an onlooker threw them a life ring and pulled them to safety.
The incident happened at around 17:00 BST on Saturday.

Mr Hopkins, a chef, said he was about to have a meal at a pub on the waterfront when he heard the boy's mother screaming.
"I could see the boy two feet under the water, I dropped my mobile phone and just dived in," said Mr Hopkins.
"I cannot watch a kid drown, you've got to do something."

But when Mr Hopkins jumped in, the water was bitterly cold.
"I have never been so cold in my life," he said. "The top two foot of water was ok but below that it was freezing.
"It was sapping all my strength
.

"The boy was screaming and fighting me, he took me down three or four times, I honestly thought I was going to die."
Mr Hopkins pulled the child onto his chest and swam doggy-paddle to the dock wall.

But there was nothing to hold on to and he had to cling on to bits of brick before an onlooker threw down the life ring.

Paramedics took the boy to hospital suffering from hypothermia.
Mr Hopkins said he would visit the child after he was fully recovered.

"I don't think I'm brave - there's a child in the water and you're not going to let him die," he said.
But Mr Hopkins' daughter Jody added: "He says that he isn't a hero and that it was just instinct.
"But I think he is amazing, he's a real hero."

Steve Matthews, of Swansea Coastguard, said it appeared the child's mother had been feeding her other child, aged one, and lost sight of her son who ended up in the water.

"The advice we have for those around the marina is to make sure that you have got a visual of your children and watch them as best you can around any water source," he said.
"If they're a toddler take precautions, for example putting them in reins."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-south-west-wales-28838033

Kudos to Mr. Hopkins. yeay
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PostPosted: 25-08-2014 07:05    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome news:

Cornish coast watch stations given special call channel
3:00pm Sunday 24th August 2014 in News

As of October it will be much easier for seafarers to obtain information and make contact with the land thanks to a new VHF radio channel that will be run by the National Coastwatch Institution (NCI), including on the Lizard Peninsula. [FP typo corrected!]

The NCI will gain exclusive use of Channel 65 as of October 1, which was offered to them by Ofcom.
The channel will give all users of the sea a way of contacting the NCI stations directly. They will now be able to easily access information such as weather reports as well as the NCI being able to communicate information requests.

There are a total of 50 NCI Stations around the coast of England and Wales, 13 of which are in Cornwall including Bass Point at The Lizard and Nare Point near Manaccan.

Stations will be able to respond to requests from passing, as well as local, sailing craft and fishing vessels for radio checks and actual weather/sea state conditions.

They will also be able also to provide on-request information on a range of local facilities, for example, local moorings, charted anchorages, water taxi contact details and local hazards.

NCI chairman Alan Richards said: “NCI has long aspired to have the use of a dedicated marine VHF channel to facilitate radio communications between stations and seafarers.
“This is a major milestone for us, not least as we celebrate the 20th anniversary of the start of our organisation. It is indeed a significant and welcome step forward for NCI and is an acknowledgement of our professional capability to communicate effectively with all who use our coastal waters and with our Search and Rescue partners at local and national level.”

West Cornwall MP and patron, Andrew George, passed on his congratulations during a recent visit to the St Ives. He said: “I offer my congratulations to the NCI on obtaining the VHF channel. This is a significant development for the NCI. The confirmation of a dedicated VHF channel adds yet another string to the bow to this impressive voluntary organisation.
“It was my privilege to visit the St Ives branch of the NCI and once again witness the vital contribution that the NCI makes to safety around our coasts. Obtaining an exclusive VHF channel is a feather in their cap and a string to their bow.”

The NCI was set up in 1994 and has 50 stations around the coast of England and Wales, which are all manned by 2,000 volunteers.

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/11421516.Cornish_coast_watch_stations_given_special_call_channel/?ref=rss
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PostPosted: 26-08-2014 09:04    Post subject: Reply with quote

Man dies near Padstow diving with friends

A 63-year-old man has died after getting into difficulties while diving with a group of friends in Cornwall.
Rescue teams were called to Trevose Head, near Padstow, at 14:30 BST on Monday.
The man was airlifted to the Royal Cornwall Hospital but was confirmed dead on arrival. He was said to be visiting the area.

A spokesperson from Devon and Cornwall Police said an inquiry was ongoing to establish the nature of the incident.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-28934841

Trevose head, like many headlands, creates strong tidal flows and overfalls, and we're coming up to Springs. But experienced divers would avoid such places at dangerous times. Sadly there are many other ways diving can be dangerous.

Pics of Trevose Head (showing the tide flow), near foot of page here:

http://cornwalltidesreach.weebly.com/nq-padstow2.html
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PostPosted: 26-08-2014 09:31    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sailing dinghy crew use flares to attract rescuers off Helford River
First published 08:56 Tuesday 26 August 2014

Two people in a hired sailing dinghy had to use flares to alert the lifeguards after their rudder broke on Monday afternoon.

Falmouth Coastguard asked the Falmouth inshore lifeboat to help at around 1.50pm after the crew of the Wayfarer dinghy fired a parachute flare off the entrance to the Helford River.
As the Inshore Lifeboat approached the Helford the crew on the dinghy fired a hand held flare to pin point their position.

An RNLI spokesperson said: “It was soon confirmed that the dinghy’s rudder had broken so it was taken in tow back towards Gillan Creek.

“Soon afterwards the inshore lifeboat crew became aware of a windsurfer which appeared to be struggling in the prevailing conditions so the sailing dinghy was secured to a nearby buoy while the lifeboat investigated.
“Soon after reaching the windsurfer another boat arrived to assist so the lifeboat returned to the sailing dinghy and continued to tow it back to Gillan Creek where it was safely dropped off.”

The RNLI said the pair had hired the dinghy locally, and were well equipped.

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/fpfalmouth/11431850.Sailing_dinghy_crew_use_flares_to_attract_rescuers_off_Helford_River/

Parachute flares are fine at night, but can be missed in bright daylight (as it was yesterday, for a while!).
An alternative would be an Orange Smoke flare, which is visible against the sea in bright or dull weather.
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